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Full text of "The South Carolina historical and genealogical magazine"

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GENEAUOGY COUL-ECTIOM 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01740 1297 



GENEALOGli 
975.7 
S088SA 
1914-191E 



THE 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 
MAGAZINE 



PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY THE 

SOUTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



EDI T EO BY 
MABEL LOUISE WEBSER 



VOLUME XV. 




Ph.n^eo for the Society by 

W ACKER. EVANS 4 COGSWELL CO,' 

Cmarueston, S. C. 

1914 



OFFICERS 

OF THE 

South Carolina Historical Society, 

January, 19 14 — January, 19 15. 

President, 
Hon. Joseph W. Barnwell. 

ist Vice-President, 
Hon. Henry A. M. Smith, 

2nd Vice-President, 

Hon. Theodore D. Jervey. 

jd Vice-President. 

Hon. F. H. Weston. 

4th Vice-President, 

Hon. John B. Cleveland. 

Secretary and Treasurer and Librarian, 

Miss Mabel Louise Webber. 

Curators : 

Langdon Cheves, Esq., D. E. Huger Smith, Esq., 

Charles W. Kollock, M. D., 
Prof. Yates Snowden, Capt. Thomas Pinckney, 

Prof. C. J. Colcock, M. Alston Read, Esq., 

A, S. Salley, Jr., Esq., Henry S. Holmes, Esq. 

Board of Managers, 

ALL of the foregoing OFFICERS. 

Publication Committee, 
Henry A. M. Smith, Joseph W. Barnwell, 
A. S. Salley, Jr. 



; 



6 ^ 



THE 
SOUTH CAROLINA 

HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 
MAGAZINE 




PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY THE 

SOUTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



VOLUME XV.. NO. 1. 



JANUARY 1914 



Entered at the Post-ofEce at Charleston, S. C, as 
Second-Class Matter. 



Printed for the Society by 

WALKER, EVANS A COGSWELL CO 

Charueston, S. C. 

1914 



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE. 

Joseph W. Barnwell, Henry A. M. Smith, 

A. S. Salley, Jr. 

EDITOR OF THE MAGAZINE. 
Mabel L. Webber. 



CONTENTS. 

Baronies of South Carolina i 

Wilton's Statue of Pitt i8 

Register of St. Andrews Parish 39 

Order Book of John F. Grimke 51 

Historical Notes 60 



N. B. — These Magazines, with the exception of No. i 
of Vol, I, are $1.25 to any one other than a member of the 
South Carolina Historical Society. Members of the So- 
ciety receive them free. The Membership fee is $4.00 per 
annum (the fiscal year being from Januar)^ to January), 
and members can buy back numbers or duplicates at $1.00 
each. In addition to receiving the Magazines, members are 
allowed a discount of 25 per cent, on all other publications 
of the Society, and have the free use of the Society's library. 
Any member who has not received the last number 
will please notify the Secretary and Treasurer, 

Miss Mabel L. Webber, 
South Carolina Historical Society, 

Charleston, S. C. 



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE. 

Joseph W. Barnwell, Henry A. M. Smith, 

A. S. Salley, Jr. 

EDITOR OF THE MAGAZINE. 
Mabel L. Webber. 



CONTENTS. 

Baronies of South Carolina i 

Wilton's Statue of Pitt i8 

Register of St. Andrews Parish 39 

Order Book of John F. Grimke .- 51 

Historical Notes 60 



N. B. — These Magazines, with the exception of No. i 
of Vol. I, are $1.25 to any one other than a member of the 
South Carolina Historical Society. Members of the So- 
ciety receive them free. The Membership fee is $4.00 per 
annum (the fiscal year being from January to January), 
and members can buy back numbers or duplicates at $1.00 
each. In addition to receiving the Magazines, members are 
allowed a discount of 25 per cent, on all other publications 
of the Society, and have the free use of the Society's library. 
Any member who has not received the last number 
will please notify the Secretary and Treasurer, 

Miss Mabel L. Webber, 
South Carolina Historical Society, 

Charleston, S. C. 




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67932S2 

The South Carolina 

Historical and Genealogical 

Magazine. 

VOL XV. JANUARY, 1914. No. i. 

THE BARONIES OF SOUTH CAROLINA. 
By Henry A. M. Smith. 



XI. 

RAPHOE BARONY. 



On the 16 August, 1698, John Bayley Esq., of BalHna- 
clough, in the County of Tipperary, Ireland, by a patent of 
that date, was by the Lords Proprietors of Carohna created 
a Landgrave.' The entry in the minutes is "Jo^"^!^ Bayley 
"Esq. had another Patent for Landgrave granted him be- 
"ing dated y' 16 of August, 1698, for which he is to pay 
"£100.0.0 in Ireland.'" 

This is the first mention of John Bayley in that connec- 
tion and it does not appear for what service or position the 
dignity of Landgrave was bestowed upon him. The £100. 
was not for the dignity which under the fundamental Con- 
stitutions was not purchasable and does not appear ever 
by the Proprietors to have been sold, but was in considera- 
tion of the reduced rent at which at that date the Proprie- 
tors issued the grants to lands at a quit rent thereon. The 
name is subsequently variously spelt in the old records, viz : 



'Off: Hist: Com: Book N. C, p. 333. 

'Ibid, London MSS. vol. 4. p. 70. His patent as Landgrave in 
Latin is recorded in Bk. Q. Q., 1685-1712, p. 321. 



4 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Bayley, Bayly, Bailey and Baily. The correct spelling seems 
to have been Bayley, as used in his patent, although the 
form Bailey is the more common. 

The original John Bayley, so far as the record discloses, 
does not appear to have come to Carolina to take out the 
lands to which he was entitled under his landgrave's patent. 
On his death his landgraveship descended to his son and 
heir of the same name. This last also does not appear to 
have come to Carolina, but on 9*" November, 1722, he 
executed a power of attorney to one Alexander Trench of 
Charles Town' empowering the latter to take possession of 
and sell and dispose of the lands in Carolina to which the 
former was entitled under the patent issued to his father. 

Trench, if not then living in Charles Town, seems to 
have soon proceeded there and arranged to have surveyed 
out and to dispose of the lands. The method pursued by 
him in so doing seems to have been unique as practiced by 
him and by the second Landgrave, Bellinger. The patent 
as Landgrave entitled the holder to four baronies of 12,000 
acres each, or 48,000 acres in all. The course pursued 
under the instructions of the Proprietors from the settle- 
ment of the colony was that in all such cases an application 
was to be made for a grant and a specific grant made before 
the applicant became entitled to the land, i.e. the party hold- 
ing a patent, or receipt, or certificate, entitling him to a 
grant made application to the council for a grant. There- 
upon a warrant was issued to the Surveyor General to 
survey for the applicant out of land not already granted the 
acreage for which he applied. The Surveyor General hav- 
ing surveyed the land made a plat with his certificate of 
survey annexed and a grant was then issued to the applicant 
by the Governor and the deputies of the Proprietors for 
the land described in the plat and certificate. 

Copies of the plat and certificate were kept in the records 
of the Surveyor General's office. 

Alexander Trench does not seem to have followed this 
course. He would have a parcel of land surveyed 
out for an intending purchaser from him and then 

'M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. D., p. 163. 



THE BARONIES OF SOUTH CAROLINA $ 

annex the plat to a deed of conveyance direct from him- 
self as attorney for John Bayley to the purchaser 
as made for land to which Bayley was entitled under his 
patent. No direct grant from the Lords Proprietors would 
thus appear for that specific parcel of land. 

Trench probably returned copies of all plats surveyed for 
him to the Surveyor General's office so as to keep the 
record and prevent double grants of the same land. As 
most of the old records of such plats prior to 1732 have 
apparently been destroyed— at least they are not to be found 
among the State records in Columbia — it cannot be ascer- 
tained definitely whether Trench did so or not; but as copies 
of a number of the plats made for him in this way are 
scattered throughout some of the old record books, it would 
appear probable that he did. 

The consequence has been that titles originating from 
John Bayley cannot be traced back to a definite grant. They 
commence with a deed of conveyance from Trench, as At- 
torney for Bayley, and not being listed or indexed as granted, 
it is most difficult at times to go back to the first holder. 
The only other case in which to the ascertainment of this 
writer the same course was followed to any extent is that 
of Landgrave Edmund Bellinger with this difference, that 
Landgrave Bellinger seems to have had the lands surveyed 
out and platted for himself and in his own name, whereas 
in the majority of cases Trench would apparently bargain 
off so much land to a third person, have it surveyed and 
then convey the land surveyed to the party. 

Exactly, therefore, when the Raphoe Barony was sur- 
veyed out cannot be ascertained. 

There is no grant for it on record. The plats of the date 
at which it was probably laid out are not now to be found 
in Columbia. The writer has seen a copy of an old plat, ap- 
parently in the handwriting of Joseph Purcell, a surveyor 
of excellent standing in the low country at the end of the 
iS'" and beginning of the 19*" centuries. This plat is 
described as "Copy of a plan of Raphoe Barony on Santee 
"River from a plat on parchment taken June 1803" and is 
endorsed "Plan of Raphoe Barony belonging to John Bay- 
"lie Landgrave." It is a matter of speculation whether the 



6 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

name Raphoe is of Indian origin. The ending "e" or "oe" 
would so indicate, but it may be after some Irish or other 
locahty. 

The plat annexed to this article is made from the old copy 
plat above referred to. 

The record does not disclose any transfer of this Barony 
from John Bayley. Trench died about 1731 or 1732, or in 
that neighbourhood. 

After Trench's death the Barony seems to have been 
abandoned. At least no transfer or disposition of it can 
be found on the record by John Bayley or any one claiming 
under him. 

Previous to the laying out of the Barony the land to the 
West had been granted. On 15 September, 1705' there had 
been issued to John Strode (or Stroud) three grants for 
400 acres each, all adjacent and situate on the South side 
of the Santee river, forming a solid body of land of 1,200 
acres. On the easternmost of these grants was the large 
spring, then and ever since known as "Eutaw Springs." 
On the old plat it is spelt "Hutaw." Strode was the son of 
a John Strode of Barbadoes, who had taken an interested 
part in the settlement of the Province. As early as 1695 a 
grant for 500 acres' had been made to John Strode on a 
swamp or stream flowing into the head of Appee Bee or 
Fosters creek. To that he had added by grant and purchase 
until he had acquired an estate of about 1,600 acres. Strode 
seems to have died in the province, leaving a widow, Susan- 
nah, who later, certainly during or prior to 1712, married 
the Honorable James Kinloch, son of Sir Francis Kinloch 
Bart : of Gilmerton in East Lothian, Scotland. Through pro- 
ceedings for the settlement of Strode' s estate the lands near 
Fosters' creek as well as those on Santee river passed to 
James Kinloch, who on 26 Deer, 1749,° conveyed 200 acres, 
the Southern half of the Easternmost grant of 400 acres, 
to Margaret O'Neal. Upon the part so conveyed was the 
Eutaw Spring. The tract conveyed is described as bound- 
ing Southeast and Northeast on lands laid out to "Land- 

*Off: Secy. State, Grant Bk. 35, p. 480. 

^bid, p. 163. 

"M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. G. G., p. 27. 



THE BARONIES OF SOUTH CAROLINA 7 

grave Trench." The remaining i.ooo acres of the Strode 
grants, James Kinloch, on 5 February, 1750, conveyed to 
his son, Francis Kinloch, who on 2 December, 1756, con- 
veyed the remaining 200 acres of the Easternmost Strode 
grant (the part fronting on the river) to George Austin.' 

In the deed it is recited that James Kinloch had become 
entitled to the 1,200 acres, which was bounded East and 
South by "Trench's Barony called Raphoe or vacant land," 
and this is the only other mention of the name "Raphoe" on 
the record that the writer has fpund. The 200 acres con- 
veyed is described as bounding Northeast "on Trench's 
"Barony or vacant land." 

On 4 May, 1757,' Francis Kinloch conveyed the remain- 
ing 800 acres to Thomas Lynch and on 19 April, 1769, 
Thomas Lynch and Isaac Motte J'' conveyed the 800 acres 
to Peter Sinkler and James Sinkler. The name of "Belvi- 
dere'' was given to this tract of 800 acres at a very early 
date, whether during the ownership of the Kinlochs, Lynch, 
or the Sinklers, the record does not disclose, but this name 
it has ever since retained, and the tract has also since re- 
mained, as it still does, in the Sinkler family. 

During this period the Barony seems to have lain as it 
w^ere abandoned. In the last deeds of Francis Kinloch it is 
described as "or vacant land" and new grants were issued 
for parts of it. As early as 1747 Margaret O'Neal had ob- 
tained a grant for 100 acres (afterwards called the Plum 
Patch) within the Barony lines. Margaret O'Neal, who 
was the w-idow of Charles O'Neal, afterwards (in 1753), 
married James McKelvey," and James McKelvey took out 
a number of grants, many of which w'ere for land within 
the Barony lines. According to certain affidavits on the 
record" both James McKelvey and Margaret O'Neal (who 
was also born McKelvey) were from a place called Brackey 
in the Parish of Fermon Magurk in the Barony of Omagh. 
County Tyrone, Ireland. One of the plantations owned by 
McKelvey was called Brackey. A number of grants within 

'Ibid, Bk. B. B., 501. 
*Ibid, Bk. W. 5, p. 83. 
"Ibid, Bk. I. No. 7, p. 386. 
"Ibid, C. No. 6, p. 381. 



8 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

the Barony lines were taken out by others, too numerous for 
recapitulation, and by 1775 the entire area seems to have 
been regranted. Francis Kinloch, on 22 Novr., 1760, re- 
ceived a grant within the Barony for 1,000 acres, at a place 
known as Dawshee or Dorchee, immediately adjacent to the 
East to the Strode grants, which he subsequently transferred 
to Tacitus Gaillard." 

The name Raphoe seems to have disappeared, and as 
many of the new grants included land both within and with- 
out the Barony the lines of the Barony as distinctive recog- 
nizable lines were disregarded. Exactly what plantations 
afterwards occupied the area of the Barony it is impossible 
for the writer to say without more maps than he has found 
upon the record. Beginning at the line between the Barony 
and the Eutaw Springs tract and going East, the first plan- 
tation on the river was Brackey, on a part of the Francis 
Kinloch 1,000 acre grant. It belonged for a long time to 
the McKelvey's, from whom no doubt it received the name. 
Then followed Dawshee or Dorchee, which seems to have 
been subdivided into three, viz : Black Jack, Old Dawshee, 
and New or Little Dawshee. Then came Walnut Grove, a 
plantation at one time owned by Gabriel Marion and by 
him devised to his son, Benjamin Marion," and which was 
afterwards acquired by Capt. Peter Gaillard of the "Rocks" 
who transferred it to his son, James Gaillard. Then fol- 
lowed "Pond Bluff," the plantation owned by General' 
Francis Marion of the Revolution. To what extent (if at 
all) the next plantation, "Black Branch," w^as within the 
lines the writer cannot indicate. So as to the plantations 
lying away from the river, the following seem to have been 
within the Barony lines, viz : Belmont, Blue Hole, Lime- 
spring, New Mercia, Brush Pond, and Ash Hill. Possibly 
a portion of "The Rocks," the plantation of Capt. Peter 
Gaillard of the Revolution was also in part within the 
Barony, and so also as to "Walworth" plantation. The 
change of ownership and change of name of much of this 
property seems to have been quite constant, altho up to i860 

"Ibid, D. No. 3, p. 728. 

"Prob: Ct. Charleston, Will dated 29 Febry., 1776. 



THE BARONIES OF SOUTH CAROLINA 9 

the land was owned by practically the descendants of the 
same group of families. 

The road to the "Congarees" on the old map called the 
"Charichy" (Cherokee) path ran directly across the Barony 
to the ferry known as Nelson's ferry, over which the trade 
to the interior, to the Northwest, passed. It was during the 
war of the Revolution the highway for the passage of the 
armed forces of both sides, and it was at the Eutaw Springs 
(on the Strode grant), near this road, that was fought, in 
1 78 1, the battle of Eutaw Springs, which although tactically 
a repulse to General Greene and the American Army, yet 
practically ended all British occupation of South Carolina 
outside of the City of Charleston and its environs. The 
land within the Barony apparently was excellent and with 
the cultivation of cotton the section attained to a high de- 
gree of material prosperity. As was the case with the rest 
of the low country of South Carolina the consequence of 
the war of 1861-1865 was to destroy all this. The accumu- 
lations of years of labour were swept away. The whole 
economic system on which the industry of the country was 
based was changed and the result has been that the same 
complete change in the ownership and occupation oi the 
land has taken place. 



XII. 



THE TOMOTLEY BARONY. 

Tomotly, Tomotlee, Timotly, Timotlee, as it is variably 
spelt, was the name apparently of Indian origin of a locality 
in Granville (now Beaufort) County. It was in the lands 
occupied by the Yemassee Indians. After the expulsion of 
those Indians, consequent upon the Yemassee war of 171 5, 
those lands known as the Yemassee lands became open to 
settlement. 

Edmund Bellinger appears in the Province as early as 
1692. He is called "Captain" Edmund Bellinger, possibly 
was a ship captain, but at any rate stood well with the Lords 
Proprietors, was in 1697 the deputy of Lord Craven, in 1698 



10 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

was appointed Surveyor General and was a member of the 
Grand Council. 

In 1698 he assisted the Proprietors in drawing up the 
fifth (and last) set of Fundamental Constitutions proposed 
for the government of the Province.' 

By a patent dated 7 May, 1698, he was created a Land- 
grave. The memorandum on minute is "Capt. Edmund 
"Bellinger had a patent for Landgrave Granted him, being 
"dated y' 7*" of May, 1698, for which he is to pay £100. in 
"Carolina."' 

This £100. was not as has been erroneously stated in 
payment for this dignity of Landgrave. That dignity was 
by the Fundamental Constitutions not purchasable, and so 
far as this writer knows there is no instance in which it was 
by the Lords Proprietors attempted to be sold. 

It was paid "as a consideration for reducing the rent of 
"their Lands to ten shillings for one thousand acres.'" 

Under this patent a barony containing 13,000 acres was 
laid out in the Yemassee lands and included the savannah or 
swamp known by the name of Tomotley. When the barony 
was run out the record does not disclose. It would appear 
that Edmund Bellinger (both the first and the second Land- 
grave of that name ) followed the plan that has been de- 
scribed in the account of the Raphoe barony as pursued by 
Alexander Trench, of having the land run out directly under 
the patent, without applying for any further specific grant 
therefor. 

The first Landgrave died, leaving a will dated 10 October, 
1705, whereby he devised all the lands under his patent to 
his son Thomas, upon whose death the lands descended to 
his brother, the second Landgrave, Edmund Bellinger.* The 
latter in his memorial dated 22 May, 1733/ states the whole 
13,000 acres as then in a body and as having descended to 
him from his brother, Thomas. It is thus possible that the 
13,000 acres may have been run out by the first Landgrave. 
The record does not show when the first Landgrave died. 

'Collec". Hist: Soc: S. C, vol. 1, p. 145. 

'Ofif: Hist: Com". S. C, London MSS., vol. 4, p. 70. 

'Ibid, p. 45. 

'Off: Hist Comni: Memo Bk. 3, p. 137. 

"Ibid. 



THE BARONIES OF SOUTH CAROLINA H 

His will is stated to have been dated in 1705. It is not 
likely that the Barony was run out until after the Yemassee 
war, and thus unless the first Landgrave lived until that 
date the Barony was run out under his patent but by either 
his son, Thomas, or his son, Edmund, most likely the last. 
(M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. B. B., p. 71.) 

The second Landgrave died in 1739, leaving a will stated 
in the deeds to have been dated 21 Febry, 1739, but which is 
not now to be found on the record. He left a widow, 
Elizabeth, the daughter of Shem Butler, and according to 
a memorial or list filed by her 17 July, 1747,* the barony or 
13,000 acres had been disposed of by that time, as follows : 

500 acres to Edmund Bellinger. 
1,000 acres to Edmund Bellinger, J'. 
1,000 acres to George Bellinger. 

500 acres to Hon. Charles Pinckney. 

500 acres to William Elliott. 
2,000 acres to Henry Hyrne. 
1,000 acres to Burnaby Bull. 
1,000 acres to William Bellinger. 
1,000 acres to M". Eliz. Bellinger, his widow. 
1,000 acres to Elizabeth Bellinger, his daughter. 
1,000 acres to William Bellinger, J''. 
1,000 acres to daughter, Mary Bellinger. 

50 acres to Church Commissioners for the purpose of 
a Church. 

887 acres to Thomas Butler. 



12,437 



This seems however to be in conflict with other deeds on 
the record. 

On 25 July, 1744/ Elizabeth Bellinger, Widow and Ex- 
ecutrix of Landgrave Bellinger, by authority conferred in 
his Will conveyed to James Deveaux 906 acres on "Tomotly 
Savannah." This 906 acres, James Deveaux. on 25 January, 
1755,' conveyed to Ralph Izard, the grandson of Walter 

-Ibid, Memo Bk. 7, p. 481. 

'M. C. O. Charleston, Book A. A., p. 174. 

nbid, Bk. F. F., p. 366. 



12 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Izard, the son of Ralph Izard, the immigrant.' Ralph Izard 
died in February, 1761, leaving the Tomotley plantation to 
his son, Walter, who at his death in 1788 left it to his 
brother, Ralph."* On the death of this last Ralph Izard, 
intestate, and the division of his estate, the Tomotley plan- 
tation was allotted in 1813 to his daughter. Patience W. B. 
Izard, afterwards M". Eustis," who died in i860 still pos- 
sessed of it. So that the Tomotley plantation as part of the 
old barony had been in the Izard family from 1755 to i860, 
and in the two families of Bellinger and Izard (save for 
the 10 years it was held by James Deveaux) from the time 
it was first laid out until M", Eustis' death. 

The writer has never found any map of the complete 
barony of 13,000 acres, nor any collection of maps of adjoin- 
ing places sufficient to reconstitute the old lines of the 
barony. The Tomotley plantation was certainly part of it 
and Sheldon Church appears also to be on the 50 acres part 
of the barony given or conveyed for the purpose. The 
house on the Tomotley plantation was destroyed in 1865 by 
Sherman's invading army. There still remains the old grove 
of live oaks, one of the finest in the low country of South 
Carolina. 



XIII. 



MALLING BARONY. 

This so-called barony was really not a barony under the 
definition of what constituted a barony in South Carolina 
as explained in the first of these articles on the Baronies of 
South Carolina.' It did not contain 12,000 acres nor was it 
granted to a Proprietor, a Landgrave, or a Cassique. In 
the case of Boon's Barony, described in a previous number 
of this Magazine,' the grant altho' less than 12,000 acres 
was to a Cassique. 

"S. C. Hist: & Gen: Mag: vol. 2, p. 233. 
"Ibid, p. 234. 

"S. C. Hist. & Gen. Mag., vol. 2. p. 237. 
'Hist: & Geneal: Mag: of S. C., vol. XI, p. 75. 
'Ibid, vol. 13, p. 71. 



THE BARONIES OF SOUTH CAROLINA 13 

In the present case it was called a barony simply because 
it was owned by one who seemed to be regarded as a person 
of such distinction that his holding was styled erroneously 
a barony. 

On September 15, 1705' there was granted to Jean or 
John Boisseau a tract of 2,700 acres lying to the Northeast 
of the grant of 1,800 acres to John Stevens or the settlers 
of Dorchester/ John Boisseau dying thereafter was sur- 
vived by his widow, Mary Boisseau, who, about April, 171 1, 
married James Gignilliat "Clarke."' What relation this 
James Gignilliat bore (if any) to Jean Frangois Gignilliat, 
the first Swiss to settle in the Province, the writer has never 
been able to ascertain. From his profession "Clarke" he 
likely was the minister to the French Huguenot settlement 
in Goose Creek, of which John Boisseau was one and whose 
grants and settlements lay near this Boisseau grant. 

Boisseau's lands seem to have passed by will to his widow, 
for after her marriage to Gignilliat her husband and herself 
proceeded to dispose of and convey the lands. From this 
tract of 2,700 acres a subdivision of 831 acres was conveyed 
by James and Mary Gignilliat to Jonathan Fitch and on 25 
March, 1716, this tract of 831 acres was by Jonathan Fitch 
and Ann his wife conveyed to Elizabeth Barrington." 

Who Elizabeth Barrington was or what her connection 
with S". Hovenden Walker does not appear on the record, 
but on the 4 April, 1716, she executed a declaration stating 
that this tract of 831 acres (together with another tract of 
210 acres formerly a separate grant to John Boisseau also 
conveyed to her by Fitch and wife ) , had been purchased with 
the money of S'. Hovenden Walker and that her name was 
only used in trust for S'. Hovenden Walker to whom all 
the land so purchased belonged.' 

S'. Hovenden Walker had had a distinguished career in 
the English Navy; according to the Dictionary of National 

'Off: Secy of State Grants, vol. 38, p. 507. 
'S. C. Hist: & Geneal: Mag: vol. 6, p. 70. 
'Off. Hist. Com"., Bk. 1701-1714, p. 161. 
"Off. Hist. Com". Bk. 1714-1717, p. 199. 
'Ibid. 



14 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Biography he was born about 1656, the son of Col. William 
Walker, of Tankardstown, Queen's County, Ireland, and 
having entered the navy was captain in 1691, and held 
successive commands in active service. He was at the bat- 
tle of Barfleur and in 1696, as Captain of the Finesight of 
50 guns he beat off two French ships of 60 and 70 guns. 
In 1698 he was flag captain in the Mediterranean expedi- 
tion, with local rank as Admiral, and in March, 1710/11 
he was made Rear-Admiral of the White, Knighted, and 
placed in command of the Naval expedition against Que- 
bec. In ly 11-12 he was commander-in-chief at Jamaica. 
His biography adds that "about 171 5 in disgust left the 
"country and settled in South Carolina." 

The record above cited shows when and where he set- 
tled. The tract of 831 acres on which he seems to have 
lived and which was known as his "barony" is about three 
miles from the present town of Summerville, between that 
town and the station on the Southern Railway known as 
"Ladsons." 

According to the dates he must have settled in the Prov- 
ince just about the close of the Yemassee war of 171 5, and 
seems to have at once "stood upon his rights and privileges" 
as he considered himself entitled to them. 

The following notice or proclamation and letter are 
spread on the records of the time. The explanation would 
appear to be that either S'. Hovenden or some employee 
of his had been called on for some military service under 
the law of the day in the Province, and that a horse of his 
had been seized, either to enforce the service or in pay- 
ment of some fine imposed for failure to perform it. 

"By The hon"'" : Robert Johnson Esq'. Govern\ Capt Gen- 
erall admirall & Comand' In Chief In y** Province of 
South Carolina. 

Whereas S'. Hovenden Walker of Mailing Plantation In 
South Carolina Kn*. having Served Two Hole Warrs at 
Sea in the Reigns of King William & Queen Mary and 
Queen Anne and in That Service Arriving to the honour of 



THE BARONIES OF SOUTH CAROLINA 15 

being Rear admirall of the White Squadron of the Royall 
Navy and at Two Severall Times Comanding in Chief e In 
America with the Union Flagg at Maintopmast head as 
well as being a Brother of Trinity house of Deptford 
Stroud had thereby the Right and Privilege in Great 
Britain of being Exempt from providing or bearing Ar- 
mour or to be Taxed or Contribute unto the Charge Thereof 
and from doing and Contributing to any Manner of Land 
Service Whatever then as a mariner and Seaman in Sea 
Service as also from being Sumoned or Put in assizes Jurys 
Inquests attaints or other Recognizances whatever. 

Therefore that the Said S'. Hovenden Walker may have 
No Just reason to Complain that upon his Settling here in 
S". Carolina any of those his bove Said Long Enjoyed 
rights and Priviledges are in any Wise Invaded or Taken 
from him Notice is hereby Given to all Judges, Magis- 
trates officers Civill and military Generall & Field officers 
and all others whom it may Concerne that the said S'. 
Hovenden Walker nither himself his overseer or other 
white Servants in his Wages or bought for Term of Years 
Shall be Summoned or obliged to appear at any Muster or 
alarm whatsoever and he and they are Hereby Excepted 
from the Same. 

Given und' : my hand and Seal at Armes this 2t,^ day of 
June Anno Dom : 1718 

Rob\ Johnson'" 

"Hon". S". 

As to Those Particular Priviledges You have Desired of 
me to Grant you Both in relation to your Quality and as a 
Member of Trinity-house I have Laid the Same before The 
Councill and They have readily Consented to the Same and 
have ordered the Same to be Engrossed and Will Take the 
first oppertunity to Transmitt it to You. 

If you Please to Send to Nathaniel Riscoe and De'uand 
your Horse of him Probably he will Consider of the Same 

'Off. Hist. Com"., Bk. 1714-1717, p. 202. 



16 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

and give you no further Trouble otherwise You may Put 
my Warr'. in Force and I Shall do you Justice who am 

Hon'. S^ 

Your humble Servant 

Rob'. Johnson 
From my Plantation 
June the 25'" 1718 

To S'. Hovenden Walker 
at his Plantation. These.'" 

S\ Hovenden Walker took an active part in the over- 
throw of the Proprietory government in 1719. He was 
present and participated in the armed demonstration against 
the government and was made President of the Revolu- 
tionary Council. He soon ceased to act with the Council, 
for what reason the record does not disclose, and retired to 
his plantation and seems to have soon after left the Prov- 
ince. On 12 April, 1720, he made a power of attorney to 
Robert Howes, D'. James Cavanagh and Henry Houser, 
authorizing them to sell all his hands and personal 
property in South Carolina, and presumably that was 
about the date of his departure; altho there is on record 
the evidence of the transfer to him on 28*" June, 1720, 
from Jonathan and Anne Fitch of a tract of 519 acres 
(another part of the Boisseau 2,700 acre grant). 

Nothing seems to have been done with the so called 
"Barony" tract of 831 acres, at least no transfer from S'. 
Hovenden appears on the record; and on 19 November, 
1772, new grants were issued covering the tract as vacant 
land. One grant was to Charles Cantey for 400'" acres and 
the other to Richard Saltus for 400 acres." 

The grants do not recite that they are for land formerly 
occupied by S'. Hovenden Walker, but a comparison of 
the boundaries and acreage shows that they could not have 
covered any other land save that. 

The part granted to Richard Saltus was by him devised 
to his daughter, Elizabeth," afterw^ard s Elizabeth Prevaux 

"Ibid. 

"Off. Sec: of State, Royal Grants, vol. 27, p. 234. 

"Ibid, p. 262. 

'^Prob. Ct. Charleston, Will Bk. 1771-1774, p. 358. 



THE BARONIES OF SOUTH CAROLINA 17 

and was in 1820 conveyed by Christopher G. Hasell 
(through what connection with EHzabeth Prevaux the deed 
does not show) to D'. CorneHus Dupont/' by whose execu- 
tors it was in 1844 conveyed to the late Dr. WilHam Moul- 
trie Brailsford and formed part of his plantation near 
Summerville." 

The Charles Cantey to whom the other 400 acres was 
granted was apparently Charles Cantey of St. Stephens 
or "Mattasee.'"' At least this tract was, by three of his 
grand-daughters, M". Harriett Lequeux, Martha DuBose 
and Sarah loor (all daughters of Harriet Cantey, who 
married Richard Walter') on 28 May, 181 7, transferred 
to Lewis Poppenheim." 

There is nothing to show what reclamation and cultiva- 
tion was done by S^ Hovenden Walker. Nothing to point 
out where his house and settlement stood. There is at one 
point the evidence of a former settlement — a pile of crum- 
bling bricks and the new growth that takes possession of 
abandoned sites — but the space of time between its aban- 
/donment in 1720 and its examination by the present writer, 
say about 1890, is such as to preclude even a fair guess as 
its original settlement. 

The map attached is from the maps attached to the 
grants to Saltus and Cantey, compared with maps of ad- 
joining tracts and verified by the personal observation of 
the writer. 

"M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. G. 9, p. 136. 

"Ibid. Bk. M. No. 11. p. 207. 

''S. C. Hist. & Gen: Mag: vol. XI, p. 221. 

"Ibid, p. 236. 

"M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. V. 8, pp. 258, 260. 



WILTON'S STATUE OF PITT. 

By D. E. Huger Smith. 

The Revolution of 1689, which dethroned King 
James, was the final establishment in England and 
America of the principle of constitutional freedom. To 
establish this principle there had been an almost con- 
stant struggle from the date of Magna Charta. Thence- 
forward the struggle was and is to maintain it! 

The natural development of the Great Charter of 
1215 was the Bill of Rights of 1689. But the first was 
a regal grant of liberties extorted from the crown by 
the tenants-in-chief, while the last was a declaration of 
their rights by the subjects, even while transferring 
the crown from one head to another. 

The political struggles in England with resulting wars 
were thenceforth participated in by those "true sons of 
England," the Americans, who soon became no longer 
content only to accept results. Thus in December, 
1712, the Commons House of Assembly in South Caro- 
lina made their declaration in no uncertain terms. 
This act makes of force in Carolina sundry statutes of 
the Kingdom of England — "and also all such statutes 
in the Kingdom of England as declare the rights and 
liberties of the subjects and enact the better securing 
of the same. — " And the great political whirlpool of 
London continued for three-quarters of a century to 
be accompanied by eddies in South Carolina. 

So we read of efforts in 1727-1731 on the part of the 
Commons of South Carolina to pass important and 
unwise legislation by making it a part of tax-bills and 
thus to force the hands of the Upper House or Council. 
Six assemblies in those years were dissolved by Presi- 
dent Middleton, and each time he found the new House 
of Commons resolute in repeating the same demands. 
And in 1735 they adopted resolutions declaring it an 
inherent right of every Englishman (under which head 
they specifically included his Majesty's subjects in this 
Province) not to be charged with any taxes not "granted 



WILTON S STATUE OF PITT 19 

by his Representative in Parliament," and they closed 
with the assertion that no additions could be made to 
any Tax-Bill by any other Estate or Power whatsoever. 
This last resolution was aimed at the Upper House, 
which asserted the right to amend these Bills. It 
would almost seem that Mr. Asquith in the earlier 
part of the struggle with the House of Lords had modelled 
his course upon that of the South CaroHna Commons in 
these years. 

The Revolution of 1689 placed upon the British throne 
a continental ruler, and, with the exception of the 
twelve years of Queen Anne, from that time to the 
accession of Victoria, the sovereign of England was a 
Continental potentate. This brought England into all 
the complications of Europe, and her American colonies 
lay between an aggressive French power on the north 
and an assertive Spanish pressure on the south. It 
has been often said that it was this pressure of a common 
danger that linked the somewhat turbulent colonies 
with the still more turbulent Kingdoms of Great Britain 
and Ireland. 

But the Peace of Paris in 176v3 entirely changed the 
situation. England had now time to remember that 
she could raise a revenue in America, while the Colonies 
could more safely assert the principles of the South 
Carolina resolutions of 1735 of which it is enough to 
repeat here the first and fifth: "Resolved, That it is 
the Opinion of this House that it is the inherent right 
and privilege of every Englishman not to be charged 
with any taxes or aids of money but what are given 
and granted by his Representative in Parliament." 

"Resolved, that his Majesty's subjects of this Pro- 
vince are entitled to all the liberties and privileges of 
Englishmen." 

Thus the American colonies, which up to 1763 had 
shared with the mother country the perils of war, were 
forced to become participants in the strife of political 
parties, and it was an additional evil that the question 



20 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

of their own political status was made the subject of 
violent debate. It is then not remarkable that the 
same lines of political cleavage extended to America, 
and the associations of "sons of Liberty" rapidly spread 
there. 

Just at this time there floated to the crest of the 
political wave a man and a number, both destined to 
dominate the popular imagination and to concentrate 
the popular passion. 

John Wilkes in No. 45 of the North Briton attacked the 
King's Speech! Wilkes was promptly sent to the Tower, 
whence he was liberated by Chief Justice Pratt (after- 
wards Lord Camden) on 6 May, 1763. But in November 
of the same year his article was voted by Parliament a 
libel and he was expelled in January, 1764. Again elected 
in 1768 he was again expelled in 1769. Again re-elected 
he was again expelled and declared incapacitated to sit 
in Parliament. Again re-elected prima facie, his oppo- 
nent (Col. Luttrell) was seated in face of the large 
majority against him. In June, 1769, Wilkes was con- 
victed and sentenced to imprisonment, whereupon he 
was elected while in prison an Alderman of London. 
The fame of No. 45 grew with that of its author, and 
both name and number were welcomed in America as 
battle-cries. 

For throughout this period the political battle had 
been waged fiercely in America; the Stamp Act had been 
passed in 1765, and on the invitation of Massachusetts 
the first American Congress had met in New York on 
October 7th, 1765. Tumults in the various chief cities 
had prevented the sale of the Stamps and actual insur- 
rections were expected to follow attempts to enforce 
the penalties of the Act. Then in the British Parlia- 
ment Pitt had asked and answered his famous question; 
"When in this house we give and grant, we give and grant 
what is our own, but can we ^ve and grant the pro- 
perty of the commons of America? It is an absurdity 
in terms." And on 19 March, 1766, the Stamp Act was 
repealed. 



Wilton's statue of pitt 21 

The resolution of the House of Commons of South 
Carolina, passed May 8, 1766, to erect a statue to Pitt 
met many adverse comments. The most interesting of 
these was printed in the South Carolina Gazette of 
1 Dec, 1766. This was dated London, 9 August, 1766, 
and was signed "A Friend of America [alias a d — n'd. 
Jacobitical Rascal]." 

It was made the vehicle of bitter abuse of Chatham, 
but is chiefly amusing for the remarks on the object 
and value of statues. It states that "we have in 
public but three in England, that of Charles I, George I 
and II." The writer adds: "The greatest honours 
bestowed on philosophers, heroes, generals, orators in 
Europe, is to place their bust in a church or town hall." 

Below this is printed an extract of a letter of the 
Committee of Correspondence to Charles Garth (dated 
the 20th of the previous month), as a proper answer, 
showing that "the sentiments of Americans with regard 
to the Earl of Chatham are not altered." 

The following extracts are from the Journal of the 
Commons House of Assembly of the Province of South 
Carolina. 

From Journal of Thursday May 8th, 1766. — "On 
motion of Mr. Lowndes 
Resolved, Nemine contradicente that this House will 
make provision for defraying the expense of procuring 
from England a Statue of the Right Honorable William 
Pitt, Esquire, to be Erected in this Province, as a me- 
morial, and Testimony of the great veneration and 
Respect, they have for his person, and the obligations 
they lye under in common with the rest of His Majesty's 
American Subjects, as well for his services in General 
to his King and Country, as for his noble. Disinterested 
and Generous assistance afforded them towards obtain- 
ing the Repeal of the Stamp Act; and it is referred to 
the Committee of Correspondence as soon as may be, 
to write to the Agent, to procure the same to be done in 
the most finished and elegant manner." 



22 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

This "Committee to Correspond with the Agent of 
this Province in Great Britain" had been appointed by 
the Commons House, Thursday, October 31st, 1765, 
and consisted of Messrs. Mazyck, Pinckney, Taurens, 
Arthur Middleton, Scott, Doyley, Parsons, Guerard, 
Brewton, Dart, and Roper. 

From the Journal of June 23rd, 1766: — 

"Resolved that the sum of £7000 be inserted in the 
Schedule for a marble Statue of the Right Honorable 
William Pitt, Esquire, to be Erected in this province." 

From Journal of June 30, 1766: — 

"Ordered, that the Public Treasurer do procure good 
Bills of Exchange to the amount of One thousand 
pounds Sterling, and remit the same to the agent in 
Great Britain towards the payment for the Statue of 
the Right Honorable William Pitt Esquire ; and also to 
provide good Bills of Exchange to the amount of the 
sums granted in the Estimate for Charles Garth Esquire, 
Agent for this province in Great Britain, and remit the 
same to him." 

From Journal of 19 November 1766:— 

"A motion was made and the question being put, 
that the Statue of the Right Honorable Wilham Pitt 
Esquire, when finished, be erected near the State House, 
at the Center of Broad Street and Old Church Street. 
It was Resolved in the Affirmative. 

Ordered, That the Committee of Correspondence do 
write to the Agent, to get the Statue of the Right 
Honorable William Pitt Esquire, made to be erected 
in an open Area." 

From Journal of 5 June 1770: — 

"A Letter from Charles Garth Esquire Agent for 
this province, in Great Britain, to the Committee of 
Correspondence was before the House and Read, ac- 
quainting the said Committee, that the Statue of the 
Right Honorable William Pitt Esquire now Earl of 



Wilton's statue of pitt 23 

Chatham was shipt for this province in the ship Caro- 
hna Packet, Captn. White. 

And the House being informed that the said Ship 
was arrived at this port, and the Statue being landed 
and lodged in the arsenal 

Ordered, that His Honor the Lieutenant Governor, 
be desired that he wnll be pleased to give directions that 
the said vStatue of the Earl of Chatham, be immediately 
erected near the State House, in the Center of Broad 
Street and Old Church Street, and to front the East. 

Ordered, that the Public Treasurer do advance a 
sum sufhcient to defray the Expense of erecting the 
said Statue, and for railing in the same. 

Resolved, that this House will make provision to 
reimburse the Public Treasurer the said sum." 

From Journal of 23 July 1770: — 

"On Motion, 

Ordered, that the Public Treasurer do advance, a 
Mr. William Adron, the Sum of One Hundred and 
Seventy five Pounds Currency; as a Compensation for 
his services in Erecting the Statue of the Right Honorable 
Wilham Pitt Esquire, now the Earl of Chatham. 

Resolved, that this House will make provision to 
reimburse the Public Treasurer, the said Sum." 

(We owe these extracts to the kindness of Mr. A. S. 
Salley, Jr., Secretary of the Historical Commission.) 

Charles Garth, the agent of the Province of South 
Carolina, was a member of Parliament. His report to 
the Commons House is doubtless in the State House in 
Columbia but has not been found. He contracted with 
Joseph Wilton for the Statue. The notice in the South 
Carolina Gazette of 6 July, 1769, of the resolution in 
the Commons House of the preceding day says : — 

"We are informed that the House Yesterday unani- 
mously resolved to disagree to the Petition proposed 
by the Agents; and have ordered that Mr. PITT'S 
Statue, cutting by Mr. Wilton of London, be sent out 
as soon as finished." 



24 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Joseph Wilton (1722-1803) was a sculptor and Royal 
Academician, of which association he was one of the 
foundation members. He made busts and statues of 
many eminent persons, as well as sundry monuments 
in Westminster Abbey, among which was one of General 
Wolfe. 

The South Carolina Gazette 17 May, 1770, supplement, 
tells of the arrival of the statue: — 

"Thursday arrived here in the Ship Carolina- Packet, 
Captain William White, from London in ?>d> days, the 
Marble Statue of that celebrated English Patriot the 
Right Hon. WILLIAM PITT, Esq. now Lord Chatham, 
for which the Assembly of this Province voted £1000 
Sterling, in the year 1766. It is a colossal Statue, done 
by Mr. Wilton, highly finished and reckoned as complete 
a Piece of Sculpture as ever was done in England. 
When ready to be landed, we are told, the Inhabitants 
of this Town are determined to draw it themselves to 
the place where it is to be erected, in the Square between 
the State-House, Guard-House, St. Michael's Church, 
and the Public Market — the present Lord Chatham 
being equally respected by them with the former Great 
Commoner. 

At the same time that the above Statue was shipped 
in Capt. White, two others were shipped for New York; 
one of his present MAJESTY, cast in Brass; the other 
of Mr. PITT, highly finished in Marble, but considera- 
bly under the Size of ours." 

The South Carolina Gazette of 24 May, 1770, tells of the 
expected landing of the Statue : — 
"The Statue of the Right Hon. WILLIAM PITT, 
Esquire, is to be landed To-morrow morning 8 o'Clock, 
on Mr. Charles Elliott's Wharf, where it will be received 
by the Inhabitants, and from thence immediately 
drawn by themselves to the Arsenal, near the place 
where it is intended to be erected." 



Wilton's statue of pitt 25 

What happened at the landing is told in the Gazette of 
31 May:— 
"Last Tuesday Morning, about Nine o'Clock, the 
elegant Marble Statue of that true Friend and undaunted 
Assertor of the Liberties of Britain and America, the 
Right Honorable WILLIAM PITT (done by Mr. 
Wilton of London) was landed upon Charles Elliott, 
Esq; his wharf, amidst a vast Concourse of the Inhabi- 
tants, many of them of the first Rank and Consequence, 
who received it with three hearty Cheers, and preceded 
by Music, after a Flag had been fixed upon the Case, 
drew it by Hand, in fifteen Minutes to a Shade, prepared 
for its Reception at the Armoury, where it is to remain 
till the Foundation and Pedestal are raised whereon it 
is to be erected. — Nothing ever was conducted with 
greater Order, than this Procession; and (except some 
of the Lookers-on, who have been remarkable for dis- 
tinguishing themselves upon too many occasions) every 
one seemed highly pleased v/ith the Respect that was 
shown to the great Patriot, by such a P^eception of 
his Statue.— All the vessels in the Harbour, except 
three (one belonging to Leith, another to Dundee &c) 
displayed their Colours upon this Occasion; and St. 
Michael's Bells would have been rang, but were stopped 
out of Regard to Isaac Mazyck, Esq, a very worthy 
Member of this Community, who lives near that Church, 
and lay extremely ill.— When the Statue was lodged, 
the Inhabitants made a handsome Present to the Sea- 
men belonging to the Ship; and their Thanks are due 
to the Owners, who have refused to receive any Freight 
for the Statue and Appurtenances, consisting of no less 
than 57 heavy Packages." 

The account of the raising of the Statue is from the 
Gazette of 5 July, 1770: — 
"Previous Notice having been given, that the Statue 
of the Right Hon. WILLIAM PITT, would be got 
ready to be raised tl2i3 Afternoon; Early this Morning, 
all the Vessels in the Harbour hoisted their Colours, and 
a Flag, with the Words PITT AND LIBERTY, and a 



26 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

fine branch of Laurel above it, was displayed on the 
Scaffolding, upon a Staff of 45 Feet high: And this 
Afternoon, in the Presence of almost the whole of the 
Inhabitants, the Statue was raised, and fixed in its 
Place, without the least Accident by the Numbers 26 
and 92, Members of the Club No. 45, who had assembled 
themselves upon this Occasion. As soon as it was fixed, 
26 members of our Assembly ascended the Scaffold; 
when the Hon. Peter Manigault, their Speaker, was 
pleased to condescend to the Request of the People by 
proclaiming the Inscription on the Pedestal, which 
were in these Words: — " 

(Here is inserted a corrected copy of the Inscription 
from Gazette of 10 July.) 

IN GRATEFUL MEMORY 

OF HIS SERVICES TO HIS COUNTRY IN GENERAL 

AND TO AMERICA IN PARTICULAR 

THE COMMONS HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY 

OF SOUTH CAROLINA 

UNANIMOUSLY VOTED 

THIS STATUE 

OF 

THE HON. WILLIAM PITT, ESQ. 

WHO 

GLORIOUSLY EXERTED HIMSELF 

BY DEFENDING THE FREEDOM OF AMERICANS 

THE TRUE SONS OF ENGLAND 

BY PROMOTING A REPEAL 

OF THE STAMP-ACT 

IN THE YEAR 1766 

TIME 

WILL SOONER DESTROY 

THIS MARK OF THEIR ESTEEM 

THAN 

ERASE FROM THEIR MINDS 

THEIR JUST SENSE 
OF HIS PATRIOTIC VIRTUE. 

"As soon as this was done. Lord Chatham's health 
was drank, 26 cannon were discharged by the Artillery 
Company, three Huzzas succeeded, and St. Michael's 
Bells rang. — Joy sat on every countenance. — This Even- 



Wilton's statue of pitt 27 

ing the Club No. 45, consisting of a great Body of the 
principal Inhabitants, are to meet at Messrs. Dillon 
& Gray's Tavern, when an elegant Entertainment is 
provided for them, when the following 45 Toasts will 
be drank, viz 

1 The King. 

2 The Queen, and Royal Family. 

3 The Lieut. Governor and the Province. 

4 The Sons of Liberty throughout America. 

5 The glorious Ninety-Two. 

6 The unanimous Twenty-Six. 

7 Our present Representatives. 

8 The Men who will part with Life before Liberty. 

9 Lord Chatham. 

10 Lord Camden. 

11 Lord Rockingham. 

12 Honour and Influence to the Friends of Britain 
and America. 

13 The Duke of Manchester. 

14 Lord Granby. 

15 Sir Wilham Meredith. 

16 All honest, resolute, and disinterested Patriots. 

17 Mr. Burke. 

18 Serjeant Glynn. 

19 Governor Pownall. 

20 The virtuous Minority of both Houses of Parlia- 
ment. 

21 Mr. Beckford, Lord Mayor of London. 

22 The Sheriffs, Townsend and Sawbridge. 

23 Alderman Wilkes. 

24 The Supporters of the Bill of Rights. 

25 James Otis, Esq. 

26 Daniel Dulany, Esq. 

27 The Pennsylvania Farmer. 

28 Success to all Patriotic Measures. 

29 Christopher Gadsden, Esq. 

30 Thomas Lynch, Esq. 

31 John Rutledge, Esq. 



28 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

32 Firmness and Perseverance in our Resolutions, 
not to flinch a single Inch. 

33 Hon. Jonathan Bryan. 

34 Hon. Henry Middleton. 

35 Hon. Peter Manigault. 

36 The Patriotic Merchants of America. 

37 Hon. Judge Lowndes, who made the Motion for 
the Statue. 

3S Charles Pinckney, Esq. 

39 Miles Brewton, Esq. 

40 Mr. Neufville, Chairman, and the General Com- 
mittee of this Province. 

41 Success to American Manufactures. 

42 Property to the Lovers of Liberty only. 

43 Our Land free, our Men honest, and Women 
fruitful. 

44 Judas's Fate to the Enemies of America. 

45 May Wilkes always prove a Scourge to Tyrants 
and Traitors, and be the Glory of Old England. 

In the South Carolina and American General Gazette, 
of 11th July 1770, the Statue is described as follows: 

It "is of fine white marble, the Habit Roman, the 
right hand holds a Roll of Parchment, partly open, on 
which we read "ARTICULI MAGNAE CARTAE 
LIBERTATUM, the left hand is extended, the figure 
being in the attitude of one delivering an Oration." 

It is interesting to see from these toasts how later 
events and the existing struggles had crowded out the 
memory of the Stamp Act. Even Chatham, the Hero 
of the day, was partially obscured by a more picturesque 
protagonist. John Wilkes and No. 45 dominated the 
situation. The flag-staff was 45 feet high; the toasts 
numbered 45, and the Club was No. 45. But two other 
mystic numbers appear in the account, both of which 
were purely American. These were No. 26 and No. 92. 

The "Unanimous twenty-six" became a prevailing 
toast on 19 Nov., 1768, in consequence of the following: — 



WILTON S STATUE OF PITT 29 

On Tuesday 15 Nov., 1768, the General Assembly 
of South Carolina met — on Wednesday they unanimously 
chose Peter Manigault to be their Speaker — on Thursday 
the Governor, Lord Charles Greville Montague, de- 
livered a speech to both Houses — on Friday his Majesty's 
Hon. Council presented their address — on Saturday 
the Commons House presented theirs — and at nine 
o'clock that night the General Assembly was dissolved. 
The House before adjourning ordered the pubHcation 
of his Excellency's speech, the Address of the House, 
and his Excellency's reply, the letter of 11 Feb., 1768, of 
the Hon. Thomas Gushing, Speaker of the late House 
of Representatives of Massachusetts Bay, the letter of 
9 May, 1768, of Hon. Peyton Randolph, Speaker of 
the House of Burgesses in Virginia, with the resolutions 
and action of this House thereupon. 

The sharp difference of opinion between Governor 
Lord Charles Montagu and the House about these 
letters may well account for the dissolution. The 
Governor warned the House to pay no attention to the 
factious letter of Massachusetts under a threat of disa- 
greeable consequences, while the House considered the 
letters "replete with duty and loyalty to his Majesty, 
respect for the Parliament of Great Britain, sincere 
affection for the mother country, and tender care for 
the preservation of the rights of his Majesty's subjects." 

The historian has remarked that a dread of un- 
pleasant consequences may have permitted the unani- 
mity of the twenty-six by keeping away certain of the 
19 other members of the House — entitled to seats. 

The Unanimous Twenty-Six were: — 

1 Christopher Gadsden. 

2 Henry Laurens. 

3 Charles Pinckney. 

4 Benjamin Dart. 

5 Thomas Savage. 

6 John Lloyd. 

7 Thomas Evance. 



30 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

8 John Rutledge. 

9 John Poaug. 

10 Peter Manigault. 

11 John Huger. 

12 Robert Quash Jr. 

13 WiUiam Moultrie. 

14 Edward Harleston. 

15 John Harleston. 

16 Wilham Scott. 

17 Benjamin Elliott. 

18 Charles ElHott. 

19 James Parsons. 

20 James Reid. 

21 James Skirving Jr. 

22 Benjamin Waring. 

23 Tacitus Gaillard. 

24 Thomas Lynch. 

25 Elias Horry. 

26 Archibald Stanyarne. 

The "Glorious Ninety-Two" were the "non-rescind- 
ers" who in June, 1768, refused to rescind the proceedings 
of the previous assembly of Massachusetts. The names 
of the various individuals in England and America 
who were toasted may easily be recognized; but toasts 
42 and 43 deserve more than a smile, and it may be 
asked how many remembered in the near future "not 
to flinch a single inch." 

No. 45 in those days played a great part in history. 
At the Middlesex election we are told that it was freely 
chalked upon the doors and elsewhere — nay, even on 
shoe-soles of the Austrian Ambassador, who was pulled 
out of his carriage for the purpose. Here, by order 
of 45 President, 26 Secretary called Club 45 to meet 
at 45 minutes after six to celebrate the release of Wilkes 
from prison. On the same occasion there met at the 
house of Captain Benjamin Stone on James Island 45 
persons who with a salute of 45 cannon sat at a table 
illuminated by 45 candles and partook of 45 dishes, 
a piece de resistance being a turtle weighing 45 pounds. 



WILTON S STATUE OF PITT 31 

Then drinking 45 toasts they broke up with hilarious 
solemnity at 11.45 P. M. 

On the same night the city was illuminated — some 
houses with 45 lights, others with 26 

In a young country men who make a mark in impas- 
sioned moments of history leave too a mark upon 
geography. That the names Pitt in various combina- 
tions and Chatham are found oft repeated on maps of 
the United States should not seem strange. 

From 1770 to 1780 the statue of the great Pitt stood 
on Broad Street appealing in his attitude to all and 
sundry to preserve and remember "Magna Carta 
Libertatum, "while the man himself continued passion- 
ately to oppose the unwise measures which were to 
lead to "the dismemberment of this ancient and most 
noble monarchy." 

The tragic stroke of apoplexy as he rose to speak in 
the House of Lords ended his great life on 11th May 1778. 

On 16th April two years later the right arm of the 
statue, holding the Great Charter, was carried away 
by a British cannon-ball fired from James Island. But 
the mutilated statue remained on its pedestal when 
the victorious British marched into the fallen city. 
Unmolested it still remained when on 14 December, 
1782, the American troops under Wayne halted under 
its shadow, while General Greene, Governor Mathews 
and Council moved past it, "greeted with smiles and 
tears." 

Then ensued a period when the statue, which had 
been erected with popular pride, came to be considered 
a nuisance, and its removal was matter for discussion. 
Thus we find in the City Gazette of Monday 8 August, 
1791, the following: — 

"No less than four chairs have in the course of a few 
months been dashed to pieces against Pitt's statue 
at the intersection of Meeting and Broad Streets. It 
is earnestly wished by many that this was wholly re- 
moved. It is at all times useless, and has often proved 
mischievous. Nor does there seem to be any obliga- 



32 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

tion on the citizens of the United States to preserve, 
at the risk of the inhabitants, a statue in honor of a 
man who expired in a fit of raving against American 
Independence, not unlike the frantic ebulHtions which 
flow from Edmund the rhapsodist, (Burke) whenever 
the French revolution comes across his distempered 
brain." 

Whether as a protest against this somewhat violent 
editorial, or as showing a bona fide desire to possess 
this valuable piece of sculpture, the same paper the next 
day printed the following advertisement: — 

"Wanted to Purchase 
PITT'S STATUE 
Two Hundred Guineas Will be immediately paid on 
delivery of the Titles, and removal from the place it 
now stands without any expense to the public. 
For further particulars apply to the printers." 

The lyCgislature in permitting the removal of the 
statue apparently did not agree with the truculent 
editor that the memory of Pitt should also be obliterated. 
In the City Gazette of 20 Dec, 1791, the wording of 
the resolution is given as adopted on 12 Dec: — 

"On motion resolved, that the city council of Charles- 
ton be authorized to remove Pitt's Statue from its 
present situation at the intersection of Broad and Meet- 
ing Streets to some other more safe and convenient 
place." 

Why this removal was not made until 1794 does not 
appear. Why Council did not fulfil the condition of 
re-erecting it in a more convenient place must be at- 
tributed, one would think, to the growth of a popular 
feeling in favor of the French Revolution. For no 
where in America did the populace side more violently 
than in Charleston with Citizen Genet, who had landed 
there in 1793, and whose name in the political toasts of 



WILTON S STATUE OF PITT 33 

the day had replaced and rivalled that of John Wilkes 
a quarter of a century before. As a sample read a 
toast offered in Philadelphia 6 February, 1794: — 

"The persecuted Citizen Genet; may his country 
reward his honest zeal, and the shafts of calumny 
levelled against him recoil upon the archers." 

The Statue was taken down 14 March, 1794. From 
City Gazette of 15 March, 1794:— 

"The marble Statue of the late William Pitt, earl 
of Chatham, which has been standing for a number of 
years at the intersection of Broad and Meeting Streets, 
was taken down, on Thursday last, in pursuance of a 
resolution of the general assembly of this state, grant- 
ing permission and authority to the city council for 
that purpose. It was afterwards lodged in the Arsenal, 
but unfortunately in the removal from its base, it fell, 
and the head was severed from the body. The iron 
railing round this effigy was previously taken away, 
and the foundation with every other part of the monu- 
ment will likewise be displaced." 

Charles Fraser, the noted painter, in his "Remi- 
niscences of Charleston," tells us that he "was present 
with other boys in the crowd, and saw it when it fell 
to the ground, through the mismanagement of those 
employed to remove it." He tells us that on the next 
day "a truculent article noticed this incident in one of 
our papers, as a happy prognostic of the success of 
the guillotine — to use their own words 'as ominous to the 
aristocrats;' the term then generally applied to all 
Americans who were opposed to French Jacobinism." 

By "The Proceedings of the 66th Anniversary of the 
Orphan House &c" (published in 1855) a light is thrown 
on the later history of the Statue. 



34 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

"Extract from the minutes of the Commissioners of 
the Orphan House, 17 March 1808:— 

— At a meeting of the Commissioners of the Orphan 
House, the following communication was received from 
the Honorable the City Council of Charleston: 

City Council. March 10th 1808. 

The Committee to whom was referred the applica- 
tion of the Trustees of the South Carolina College beg 
leave to report. 

That, on enquiry, they find Pitt's Statue to have been 
imported by a vote of the Commons House of Assembly 
of this State; that it shall be erected in Charleston. 
Although it is not mentioned as the property of the 
City in the Act of Incorporation, the City Council 
took upon them to have it pulled down as a nuisance 
in the year 1794, and used the iron railing that had 
surrounded it No opposition having been made to 
this arrangement for such a length of time by the 
Legislature, it is presumed that Pitt's Statue is con- 
sidered the property of the City even by them, although 
no better title can be shown for it than their courtesy 
or neglect. As a wish has been expressed by the Com- 
missioners of the Orphan House that they may be per- 
mitted to erect it in their enclosure, your Committee 
recommend that they have the preference provided 
that they should erect and repair it within six months; 
and if not, that it should be given up to the Trustees 
of the South Carolina College. 

The said report being considered, was agreed to. 
(Extract from the minutes.) 
(signed) 

G. M. Bonnetheau. 
Clerk of Council. 

The Commissioners of the Orphan House having 
taken the said communication into consideration, agreed 
to the same." 



C79 



Wilton's statue of pitt 35 

The statue, which had been lying in the enclosure of 
the Orphan House, where it had been thrown against 
the West wall, was thereupon removed from the dirt 
that had nearly covered it, and in May, 1808, was erected 
on a pedestal in the Orphan House yard fronting the 
building. There the effigy of the Great Commoner 
stood for nearly three quarters of a century, surrounded 
daily by groups of happy children, impressively re- 
minding them of the Great Charter of our Liberties, 
the symbol of which had been shattered when the arm 
that held it was carried away by the British cannon- 
ball. 

Then, at a meeting of the South Carolina Historical 
Society in June 1880 "Mr. Joseph W. Barnwell intro- 
duced the following resolution, which after an interest- 
ing historical discussion was adopted: — 

Resolved, That a Committee be appointed to inquire 
into the feasibility of removing the Statue of William 
Pitt, afterwards Lord Chatham, from the grounds of 
the Orphan House to a more public place in the City 
of Charleston. 

And on 9 February 1881, 

"Mr. Barnwell, Chairman of Committee on the pro- 
posed removal of the Pitt Statue reported that a con- 
ference had been held with Mayor Courtenay and that 
the Statue of Pitt would be removed from the Orphan 
House grounds to the City Square at an early day." 

In the Year Book of the City of Charleston for 1881, 
there is this brief notice of the removal: — 

"In May last the Statue of WilHam Pitt, first Earl 
of Chatham, was removed from the Orphan House 
grounds and re-erected here (Washington Square), and 
attracts much attention from visitors." 

The News and Courier ol 21 May, 1881, gives an ac- 
count of this removal with a short sketch of the history 



36 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

of the statue. In this we are told that the City Council 
sold to Judge Grimke the stones that composed the 
pedestal, by whom the slab with the inscription was 
placed in the wall of his garden, where it remained 
until the Statue was re-erected in the Orphan House 
grounds. 

In Washington Square Pitt stands today, but he 
looks no longer to the Eastward, as if addressing the 
people of England. He faces the West and in his 
attitude of persuasive appeal seem to pour out his 
eloquent words to the mighty population of these 
United States. His outstretched left arm is gone at 
the shoulder, as is the right! His severed head stands 
rudely replaced upon its neck! But his earnest face 
and figure still remain to remind us that the fundamental 
principle of liberty may be battered by enemies, may be 
defaced by false friends, and yet remain forever worthy 
of patient sacrifice and perpetual effort. 



The following extract from the News and Courier of 
17 December, 1898, makes an interesting comparison 
between the New York statue and that of South Caro- 
lina and is in other ways of interest. 

"In the course of a lecture recently delivered before 
the students of Columbia University, New York, by 
Prof. Dicey, of Oxford University, a suggestion was 
made to restore the headless statue of William Pitt 
in New York by comparing it with its replica in Charles- 
ton, S. C. Prof. Dicey thinks that the restoration 
would be "a graceful act on the part of the American 
people, and would tend to cement the bond of union 
between Great Britain and the United States of 
America." This may or may not be so, but the point 
that will interest Charleston folk most is whether the 
statue standing in the centre of Washington Square is 
or is not a replica of the one which now lies in the base- 
ment of the New York Historical Society building. 
Opinions are divided in Charleston on this subject. 



Vx^ILTON's statue of PITT 37 

The cuts of the two statues which appear in the New 
York Herald of December 11 would seem to prove 
them to have only such resemblance as might come 
from their representing the same subject and being 
the work of the same hand. The statue in New York 
is of marble, of heroic size, the figure draped and lean- 
ing against a part of a tree trunk. The head and arms 
are both missing, the former having been removed, 
it is supposed, by the Hessians, during the British 
occupation of New York city, and having decorated 
the Blue Bell Tavern, Kingsbridge, for several years 
before it finally disappeared. 

The Charleston statue is also of marble of heroic 
size, draped with the toga, which was an inevitable 
feature of historic statues in those days, and must 
once have been supported by a portion of a tree trunk. 
It has been treated with rather more reverence than 
has been accorded to Mr. William Pitt in New York, 
for it stands, after many vicissitudes, in the centre of 
Washington Square, not upon the original pedestal, it 
is true, but upon one which contains one of the stones 
of the original pedestal." 



The same article reprints from the South Carolina 
Gazette of Friday, 14th March, 1794, the following: 

"Yesterday the marble statue of the late Earl of Chatham, 
which has been standing for a number of years in Broad 
and Meeting Streets, was pulled down. The iron 
railing around it had been displaced a few days since. 
It is somewhat ominous to the aristocrats that, in 
removing this effigy, the head was literally severed 
from the body, though without any assistance from 
the guillotine. A correspondent observes that the 
executioners showed no kind of contrition on this 
melancholy occasion; not even a basket was provided 
to receive the head; not a single person was observed 
to dip a handkerchief in the blood, nor will it be at all 



3S so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

surprising if the body should remain without interment 
till the sound of the last trump. 'Sic transit gloria 
mundi." 

NOTE — In the Magazine of American History, vol. VII, 67 
and vol. VIII, 214-220, may be found accounts of the Pitt 
Statues in New York and Charleston, and a reprint from the 
Southern Literary Journal, vol. I, No. 5, Jan., 1836. 



REGISTER OF 

ST. ANDREW'S PARISH, BERKELEY COUNTY, 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 



1719-1774. 



Copied and Edited by Mabel L. Webber. 

(Continued from the October Number) 
BURIALS. 

Cap*. Frances Lander Buried p' the Rev''. M"" Sergin of S*. 

George Aug'' 28"" 1761. 
Jane y" Daught'. of Luci Boner Buried from M" Lloyd at S'. 

George, Sept\ y' 15": 1761 intr^ without a minister 
Mary y' wife of William Boneau Buried Nov"', y' 25'" 

1 761. intr'^. without a minister. 
y' Wife of Edward Say Schoolmaster at M'. Tho'. 

Elliotts Buried Dec''^ y" : 25'": 1761. inter*, without a 

minister. 
Elizabeth y' wife of Joseph Williams Buried Decb'. y' 25'" 

1 76 1 — inter", without a Minister. 
Susanah Daugh' of John Miles & Anne his wife Buried 

Deb', y' 31". 1761 
Mr. Thomas Ladson Buried p'. y' Rev". M'. Sargin of S'. 

Georges Janry y' 7'" 1762. 
Mary y' wife of John Samways Buried Jan''', y' 15*" 1762. 
Thomas Son of Doct'. Thomas Henry Johnson & his 

wife Buried Feb''': y\ 2". 1762. inter", without a 

minister 
Mary Daught' of William Chapman & Elener his wife 

Buried Feb"': y' : 11*": 1762. int'". without a minister. 
Christian the wife of George Tray Buried Feb'^ y' 27*" 

1762 intr". without a minister. 
Martha wife of William Lyford Buried Sept': y' 8" 1762. 

int'". without a minister. 
Elizabeth Daught': of Edward Miles & Elizabeth his Wife 

Buried Sept' y' 12*' 1762. inter", with', a minister 



40 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Sarah, the wife of Joseph Elliott Buried sept': 30*" 1762 

intr'*. without a minister. 
Elizabeth the wife of Doct'. Cholmondely Bering Buried 

Octo"": y' 23 1762 by the Rev^ M'. Martyn. 
George Son of Jacob Hinckle & Hannah his wife Buried 

Octo'"' 31'', 1762 inter^ without a minister. 
David Morgan a poor boy Lived with James Mathewes 

Buried Nov"'. 6"*. 1762, intr*^. without a minister. 

BIRTHS. 

Edith Daught'. of Joseph Elliott & Sarah his wife born 

Janu'^y'' 6'" 1759. 
Sarah Daught"' of Ibid born Dec"'. 11*" 1760 
Gilbert Son of Ibid born July 2']^'°' 1762 

James Son of Joseph Elliott & Catherine his wife born 

Feb'^' 12*" 1764. 
Daniel Son of Thomas Heyward and Anne his wife bom 

Decemb''. 4"' 1761 
Susanah Daugh' of Jonathan Rivers & Frances his wife 

born July 19*" 1761. 
Benjamin Son of Benjamin Elliott & Amarintia his wife 

born Dec"', y' 13'" 1763. 
George Son of Benjamin Stone & Ruth his wife born April 

7. 1763- 
Hannah Daugh' of Jacob Hinckle and Hannah his wife 

born Janu'" 20*" 1763 
Elizabeth Daughter of John Godfrey & Eliz"'". his wife 

born April 20*" 1763. 
Benjamin Son of William Mell & Anne his wife born Sept'. 

/ 19*". 1763. 
William Miles Son of Thomas Hayward & Anne his wife 

born Sept', y' I2*\ 1763 
William Thomas Harriet Son of Bennet Oldham & Harriet 

his wife born Janu'^ y' 5" 1764. 
Mathew Son of Mathew Small wood & Judith his wife born 

Dec"', y^ 10*" 1763 
r Fanney-Fitch Daught'. of Adam M'Donald and Izabellah 
J his wife born Decb'. 22**. 1763 this the oldest 
1^ Anne-Bellah Daugh'. of Ibid born Do. 22* 1763 



REGISTER OF ST. ANDREWS PARISH 41 

Henry Son of Jonathan Heape & Maryane his wife born 

March y' lo" 1764. 
Hugh y' Son of Richard King & Jean his wife born May 

y' 10'" 1764 
William Son of Thomas Fuller & Lydia his wife born 

August 17'" 1763 
Sarah Daught'. of William Fuller & Sarah his wife born 

Novemb", y' 19'" 1763. 
Son of Benjamin Elliott and Amarintha his Wife 

born Sept'. 20*^ 1764. 
William Son of Edward Miles and Elizabeth his wife 

Born 1762 

Edward Son of Ibid born 1764 

James Son of Patrick Hughs & Rebeccah his Wife born 

Novb^ y*^ 26''' 1763. 

CHRISTININGS THE REV^ CHA'. MARTYN. 

Susanah Daught\ of Jonathan Rivers & Frances his wife 

bapt"* 1762 

Benjamin Son of Benjamin Elliott and Amarincha his wife 

Bapt'"' April 4*'. 1763. 
Benjamin Son of Benjamin Stone & Ruth his wife Bapt^* 

June 19*' 1763. 
Hannah Daught*^ of Jacob Hinckle & Hannah his wife 

Bapt''. June y* 10*" 1763. 
Elizabeth Daughter of John Godfrey & Eliz"'" his wife 

Bap'^^ July / 24" 1763. 
Benjamin Son of William Mell & Anne his wife Recev**. 

into the Congregation being privately Bapt'"* Octo''^ 23*. 

1763 
William-Miles Son of Thomas Hayward and Anne his 

wife Deces*. Bapt^" priv*. Bap*"". Octo"'. y'' 9*" 1763. 
William Thomas Harriet Son of Bennet Oldham & Harriet 

his wife Bapt^'. Janu'^ y' 8*' 1764. 
Mathew Son of Mathew Smallwood & Judith his wife 

Bapt^^ Janury y" 8*' 1764. 
Charles Son of Robert Rivers & Rebecah. his wife Bapt'^ 

April y"' 2'' : 1 764 



42 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Dorothy Golightly & 1 -r. , , ,^ 

Mary Golightly / daughters of Mrs Mary Hyrne 

Widow Bapt'^ March y' 29*" 1 764 : p' Diping 
Sarah Daught'. of Henry Hyrne Decs^ & Mary his wife 

bapt''. March 29*' 1764. 
Henery Son of Johnath". Heape & Maryane his wife Bapt'" 

June y" 10'" 1764. 
Hugh Son of Richard King & Jane his wife Bapt'*. May y' 

20'" 1764. 
Sarah Daught' of William Fuller & Sarah his Wife Bapt'". 

May 1764 

BURIALS P"" rev". m\ MARTYN. 

Doct'. Thomas Henry Johnson Buried Nov''^ y' 23". 1762. 

inter", without a minister 
Martha Booth widow of S*. Pauls Parish Buried Decb'. 

20"" 1762 Buried by y' Bapt''. Preacher M'. Wheler. 
Thomas Son of John Man & (Ann his wife) Deces". 

Buried Dec', y' 27*" 1762. 
William Grace Buried Janur'' 13*" 1763 
Sarah Daught'. of Elizabeth Godfrey widow to Thomas 

Godfrey Buried March 12"" 1763. 
Edward Brown a poor man Lived with Maj'. Tho'. Fuller. 

Buried Sept\ y*' i". 1763. 
Anne the wife of Thomas Hayward Buried Sept"" y' 26*" 

1763 
John Hudson a young man Clark to Mr. Stone March*. 

Buried Octo^ i^'. 1763 
Benjamin Son of Benjamin Elliott & Amarincha his wife 

Buried Oct*•^ y" 9'" 1763. 
Mary Daught'' of Isaac Ladson & Rachel his wife Buried 

Octob\ y* 20*" 1763 inter" without a Minister. 
Robert Son of Robert Rivers Buried Nov'"' the i" 1763 
William Cattle Fuller Son of Whitmarsh Fuller & Judith 

his Wife Buried Decb' 7*" 1763. 
John Ladson Buried Decb'. 14"* 1763 inter", without a 

Minister 
Harriet the Wife of Bennet Oldham Buried Janu'''. y' 8'" 

1764 



REGISTER OF ST. ANDREWS PARISH 43 

William Thomas Harriet son of Bennet Oldham Buried 
Janury y" ii*" 1764 inter^ without a Minister. 

Col. Henry Hyrne Buried at St Bartholamews : Ashypoo 
Janu""''. y' 29'" 1764 

Hendrick Seles Servant to Doct'. Delahowe Buried July 
15" 1764. 

MARRIAGES BY THE REv" m'. MARTYN 

Adam McDonald & Izabellah Fitch married p' y' Rev^ M'. 

Skane of Prince Fredrick Parish Oct'"' 15"" 1762. 
John Ash & Grace Codner Sp"' Married Dec\ y' 22" 1763 

p' M'. Martyn. 
Henry-William Drayton [sic] & Dorothy Golightly Sp' 

Married March y' 29*" 1764 
Thomas Scriven & Catherine Nicholson Marr**. March 22*. 

1764 
Benjamin Perry & Frances Elliott Sp'. Married July y* 8*" 

1764 
Joseph Anger & Anne Miles Sp'. Married July y* 26*" 1764 
Cap*. Thomas Fole* & Catherine Melachamp Sp' Married 

Nov^'ry" i" 1764 

Thomas Verdal & fif ranees Rivers wd°. married 1764. 

Richard Jones & Mary Nutcher Sp'. married May y* 23". 

1765- 
Stephen Evins & Rebeccah Chapman Sp'., married p' y* 

Rev". M'. Willton in Cha Town June y' 24'" 1765. 
Alex' Mackintosh & Eliz""' Smith Sp'. Marr^ Nov"" 

1765- 
Charles Bowler & Elizabeth Jones Sp'. Married Nov"', y' 

21" 1765 
John Taylor & Sarah Rusel Sp'. married at James's Island 

May y' 29*" 1766. 
ColF: Thomas Fuller & Elizabeth Miles widow Married 

Sept'. 7*" 1766 
Thomas Skotowe Esq'. & Lucia Bellinger Sp'. married 

Dec". 23'. 1766. 

*Thomas Foley Esq., commander of his Majesty's ship the 
Escorte. S. C. Gas. Nov. 5, 1764. 



44 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Frances Rose & Elizabeth Ann Lining Sp\ Married p'. the 
Rev^ M^ Cooper July 2^. 1767 

William Cattell (Son of William Cattell Jim'.) was mar- 
ried to Sabina Lynch Spinster on the 8'\ day of March. 
1767 by the Rev''. M'. Joseph Dacre Wilton Assistant 
Rector of S*. Philips Charlestown. 

BURIALS P"" y' rev'*. M^ MARTYN 

Anne Daught"' of Richard King Buried July 23". 1764 int"*. 
without a minister. 

Elizabeth-Rebecca Daugh*'. of Edward Legg & (Elizabeth 
his wife) Buried Sept', y"" 2^ 1764 

Son of Benjamin Elliott and Amarincha his wife 

Buried Octo''^ 18"" 1764 

William Murdaugh : an Aprentice Lived with M'. Kirk- 
wood Buried Oct'. 23". 1764. intr^ without a minister 

Jane Daughter of Richard King Buried Nov*' y* 25" 1764. 
inter'*, without a Minister. 

Deborah the Daught' of Richard King Buried Dec"', y* 
7"" 1764 intr^ without a Minister 

Thomas White Buried a poor man who lived at Capt. Mack- 
intosh plantation Jan'^. y" 4'" 1765 intr'*. without a minis- 
ter. 

Edward Miles Buried Febe'". 28*' 1765. 

A Poor Man, a mender of broken China who died at Doct'. 
Dearing's. Buried Sept'. 9"^ 1765 

John Smith Buried Sep*'. 30*" 1765 

Edward Son of Elizabeth Miles (widow to Edw^ Miles 
Dec'.) Buried Octobe' 6" 1765. 

Lydia the wife of Thomas Fuller Buried Octo"' : y^ 15*" 

1765 
Coir : Richard Bedon Buried by the Anabaptist Teacher 

M'. Stephens Decem"'. y^ 26*". 1765 
William Fuller Buried p' y^ Rev'. M'. Wilton Janu'^ y^ 

19*': 1766 
Arthur Cattell Buried March: 18: 1766 inter', without a 

Minister 
Elizabeth Hutchins widow Buried March y' 21". 1766 

inter', without a Minister 



REGISTER OF ST. ANDREWS PARISH 45 

BIRTHS 

Harriet Daught'. of Henry Hyrne & Mary his wife born 

Octo''^ y" 9" 1760. 
Sarah Daught'. of Ibid born February I6*^ 1763. 
Benjamin Son of Ibid born April y". 2^ 1764 
Ann Barnet Elhott daughter of WilHam & Sabina his Wife 

born April 8'" 1760 
William Son of Ibid born December 26'" 1764 
Lydia Fuller daughter of Thomas & Catherine Fuller his 

Wife born March 3''. 1774. 
Benjamin Son of Tho' & Catherine Fuller his wife born 

Feb^ i3'\ 1774 
Christopher Son of Tho\ & Catherine Fuller born Novem- 
ber 26, 1777 
Washington the Son of Tho^ & Catherine Fuller born 

Octob'. 13. 1 78 1. 
Benjamin Son of John Godfrey & Elizabeth his wife 

born August y" 12'" 1764 
Anne y" Daught^ of Thomas Scott & Anne his wife born 

Decb'. y' 2^ 1764 
William Son of James Harley & Anne his wife born Feb'''. 

f- 15;" 1765. 
Benjamin Cattell Fuller, Son of Whitmarsh Fuller & 

Judith his wife Born March y' 2" 1765. 
Sarah Daught'. of Joseph Anger & Anne his wife born — 

y'' 1765- 

William Son of William Drayton Esq'. & Mary his wife 

born y\ 6'" July 1760. 
Elizabeth Daught*" of William Drayton & Mary his wife 

born August y' 16'" 1761. 
Jacob Son of Ibid born 20 Nov"'. 1762. 
Hannah Daugh'. of Ibid born y'. 18*" March 1764. 
Richard Son of Mathew Smallwood and Judith his wife 

born Feberwery y'' 15"" 1766. 
Foley Daught' of Jacob Hinckle & Hannah his wife born 

April y' i'' 1766 
Charles Son of Johnathan Heape & Maryane his wife born 

April y^ i". 1766. 



46 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

James Son of Frances Rose & Sarah his wife born Oct\ 

1765 ^ 

Mary Daught'. of George Tray & Elizabeth his wife born 

April 4*" 1765. 
Susanah Daught'. of Benjamin Stone & Ruth his Wife 

Born Nov"', y' 9*" 1765 
Charles Son of Charles Bowler & Eliz'"^ his Wife born 

August 3*^. 1766. 

CHRISTININGS F. THE REV^ M^ MARTYN 

William Son of Edward Miles and Elizabeth his wife 

Bapti'^ January 27*". 1765. 
Edward Son of Ibid Bapt^'. Jan^^ 27'", 1765 
James Son of Patrick Hughs & Rebecca his Wife Bapt''^ 

Feb'^ 17*' 1765 
Benjamin Son of John Godfrey and Elizabeth his Wife 
Bapt^'. Sepf. y^ 20*" 1764 [?] 
Anne y'' Daught'. of Thomas Scott & Anne his wife Bapt^*, 

April 28'" 1765. 
Mary Hyrne wid". An Adult Bapt''. May 7'' 1765. 
Catherine the wife of Joseph Elliott Bapt'^ May y' 23*. 

1765. 
William Son of James Harley & Anne his wife Bapt'*. July 

/ r 1765. 

Benjamin Cattell Fuller Son of Whitmarsh Fuller & Judith 

his wife bapt'^ June 1765. 
Sarah Daught'. of Joseph Anger & Anne his wife Bapt'^ 

y' 1765- 

William the Son of William Drayton & Mary his wife 

Bapt^'. by y^ Rev". M^ Smith of St. Philips & Died f 

9*' May 1764. 
Elizabeth Daugh'\ of Ibid Bapt'''. p' y' Rev'. M^ Smith 

D". [No date] 
Jacob Son of Ibid Bapt^' by y"' Rev'. M^ Wilton of S*. 

Philips. 
Hannah Daugh^ of Ibid Bapt^'. p\ y\ Rev'. M\ Smith of 

S'. Philips Charles Town. 
Richard, Son of Mathew Smallwood & Judith his wife 

Bapt^'. April y" 20*' 1766. 



REGISTER OF ST. ANDREWS PARISH 47 

Foley the Daught'. of Jacob Hinckle & Hannah his wife 

Bapr. April y"' 20*" 1766 
Charles Son of Johnathan Heape & Maryane his Wife 

Bapt'". June y° 15" 1766. 
Mary Daught'. of George Tray & his wife Bapt'^ 

June y^ 8'" 1766. 

BURIALS 

John Leafe a young man Died at Doct'. Deerings Buried. 

intr". without a Minister April 1766. 
James Son of Frances Rose & Sarah his wife Buried July 

y' 6'" 1766 p"" M"" Alason the Desenting Minister of Jam°. 

Island 
Rebeccah the wife of Patrick Hughs Buried August 15*" 

1766 intr". without a minister 
Henry Son in law to Peter Caro Buried Octo"'. 4'" 

1766 intr^ without minister 
Elizabeth Daught'. of Adam Sowers & his wife 

Buried Octo"'. 6'" 1766 inter'', without a Minister 
John Bloodgood Buried Octo""" 11'" 1766. int'*. without a 

Minister 
Mary Holman widow Buried Octo*". y' 15'" 1766 intr*. 

without a Minister. 
Charles Son of Charles Bowler & Eliz''*^ his Wife Buried 

Oct"', y' 26"" 1766 intr". without a minister. 
Policy Daugh'\ of Jacob Hinckle & Hanah his wife Buried 

Octo"". y' 27: 1766. intr'^. without a minister. 
William Elliott Sn\ Buried p^ Rev". M\ Martyn Dec''\ y' 

i". 1766. 
M" Martha Bedon widow Buried p'. the Rev'. M'. Harri- 
son of Goos Creek Janu''' y' 4*". 1767 
Sarah the wife of Frances Rose Buried January y' 31". 

1767. 
Margret Ladson widow Burried March y' 4'" 1767 p'. the 

Rev". M'. Sergant. 
Johnathan Heape Buried March 13"'. mf\ without a Min- 
ister 1767. 
John Liston Schoolmaster to Cap*. Isaac Ladson Buried 

April 2^\ 1767. intr*. without a Minister 



48 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

M". Listen widow of John Liston Buried April 29'" 1767. 
intr". with"', a Minister. 

BIRTHS 

Susanah Daught'. of John Godfrey & Patience his wife 

born June 10'" 1766. 
Elizabeth Louisa Daught'. of Richard Park Stobo and 

Mary his wife born y^ 22". Decemb^ 1758. 
Ann Daught\ of Ibid : born August 6'" 1760. 
Jean Daught^ of Ibid: born June 4" 1764 
John Rutledge Son of Richard Park Stobo, & Mary his 

wife born August 6"\ 1768 
Mary Daught'. of Ibid: born Feber'': 11*" 1770. 
Martha the Daught'. of Thomas Scott & Anne his wife 

Born Octo'^ y' 5'" 1766. 
Thomas y' Son of Edward Legge and Elizabeth his Wife 

born January i^'. 1764. 
Christopher Smith y' Son Edw**. Legge and Elizabeth his 

Wife Born Octo^ 11*' 1766. 
Mary the Daught\ of Thomas Fuller & Elizabeth his wife 

born Octo"': 25*" 1767 
Francis Son of Charles Bowler and Elizabeth his wife bom 

7'" Nov'^ 1767. 

Joseph Son of Whitmarsh Fuller & Judith his wife born 

July f 19*" 1768. 
Andrew Son of Jasper Hardlock & Mary his wife bom 

Janu"''' 1769. 

George the Son of George Tray & Elizabeth his wife bom 

April y' 3^ 1769 
Susanah y" Daught\ of Samuel Jones & Sidney his wife 

born Octo"" y\ 11*' 1768 
Mary-Elizabeth Daught"" of John Holman & Pricilla his 

wife bom 1769. 
Zackeus Son of Whitmarsh Fuller and Judith his wife 

born Sept"""^ y'' 17*" 1769 
Martha-Elliott Daugh*'. of Alexander Walker and Anne 

his wife bom Janu''^ y* 14'": 1770 
Jane Daught'. of Thomas Scott & Anne his wife bom 

April 14*" 1768. 



REGISTER OF ST. ANDREWS PARISH 49 

Sarah Pricilla Daugh"'. to Do born April 2". 1770 
Margret the Daught'. of John Godfrey and Patience his 
wife born Decern"". 17'" 1768 

CHRISTININGS P"' REV''. M^ MARTYN 

Susanah Daught'. of Benjamin Stone & Ruth his wife 

Bapt^^ Nov'^ y^ 17"' 1765. 
Martha Daught"'. of Thomas Scott & Ann his wife Bapt'^ 

July y' 6'" 1767 p' y' Rev". M'' Cooper in Charles Town. 
William-Fairchild Son of Alexander Walker & Anne his 

wife Baptized Octob' y*" 4'" 1767 priv'. Bapt"". p'. y' 

Rev". M". Ellington Minist' a Agusta. 
Thomas the Son of Edward Legge and Elizabeth his Wife 

privately Baptis'd Jan'' 8'" 1764. 
Christopher Smith the Son of Edward Legge and Eliza- 
beth his Wife privately Baptis'd Octo 12*" 1766. 
Francis Son Charles Bowler & Elizabeth his wife Bapt''" 

March y*^ 20"" 1768 
Mary Daugh". of Thomas Fuller and Elizabeth his wife 

Bapt"'. April y-^ 10*" 1768. 
Joseph Son of Whitmarsh Fuller & Judith his wife Bapt^'*. 

in S'. Phillips Parish Charles-Town Nov"', by the Rev". 

M' Hart 1768. 
Andrew Son Jasper Hardlock & Mary his wife Bapt'". April 

16*' 1769 p'. y' Rev". M\ Peirce 
George the Son of George Tray & Elizabeth his wife Bapt'". 

p' the Rev". M' Panting Priv'. Bapf™. May y' 7" 1769. 
Susanah y' Daught". of Samuel Jones & Sidney his wife 

Bapt'". May 20*" 1769 
Mary-Elizabeth Daught'. of John Holman and Priscilla 

his wife Bap*^". Dec""'. 25*" 1769. 

MARRIAGES 

Nathaniel Fuller & Anne Fuller Sp' Maried p'' y' Rev". M". 

Peirce April y' 10"' 1768. 
William Miles & Mary Elliott Sp. Married Octo"\ 26'" 

1769 p'. the Rev". M'. Martyn. 
Robert Rose & Rebeca Rivers Sp'. married p' the Rev". 

M^ Hart May y' 3". 1770. 



50 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

John-Vincent Man & Anne Westbury Sp'. married p' y' 

Rev'. M'. Martyn May y' 31'' 1770. 
John Fraser & Sarah Ladson Sp\ Married p' Rev^ M'. 

Martyn April 10*" 1770. 
Thomas Rose & Mary Sanders of Chas. Town Maried p^ 

y*" Rev". M'. Cooper May y" 20*" 1770. 
Abraham Ladson & EHzabeth Rose Sp'. Married p'. the 

Rev^ Thomas Panting May 2". 1771. 
Frances Rose & Sarah Backer Sp'. Married p'. the Rev^ 

Thomas Panting April 18'" 1771. 
Robert Gibson & Anne Maria Black Sp'. Married according 

to the Rites & Cerimonies of the Church of England 19*" 

May 1 77 1, p' the Rev". Thomas Panting. 
Nathaniel Black & Joanah Shepperd Married according to 

the Rites & Cerimonies of the Church of England 19" 

May 1 771 p'. the Rev". Thomas Panting 
John Linning & Mary Rivers Sp'. Married p' the Rev". 

Thomas Panting May y" 2;^'\ ^77^ 
Thomas Horry & Anne Branford Spr. Married p'. y'' Rev". 

M'. Christopher Earnest Shwab June 13'" 1772 
George Cree and Judith Connely Married p' the Rev". M'. 

C. Ernst Schwab 3 times published in the Church 

1772. 
Benjamin Cattell (Son of William Cattell Jun.) was mar- 
ried to Mary McCall of Philadelphia on 25'" June 1772 

by the Rev". Jacob Duche of Philadelphia 
M'. William Johnston to Ann Smith Spinster was married 

by the Rev". M'. Peirce of Dorchester on Saturday the 

20*" day of March 1773. 

(To be continued) 



ORDER BOOK 

of 
John Faiicheraud Grimke. 

August 1778 to May 1780. 
(Continued from the October Number) 

Camp at the Sisters 
March 1779 

7. Orders by Major Grimke. 

The Detachment of Artillery will Parade in future at 
the Rising & Setting of the Sun, when the Roll is to be 
called & the off: Conf : guns will appoint the men to act 
under their Command. 

The Artillery & Waggon Horses are to be kept in Geers 
all Day & at night fixed to the Field Pieces & Waggons. 

The Quarter Master Serg' : is to Supply all men coming 
off of Guard, Command or Fatigue each with a gill of Rum. 

The Quarter Master Serg' : will make an immediate re- 
turn of the Artillery Stores. 

The Con/: off: of Companies will make out the Pay- 
rolls for two Months. 

Upon an Alarm the off' : & men are to Parade in front 
of their encampment & March without Delay to take Com- 
mand of their Respective Field Pieces. Should it prove 
Serious the waggoners are commanded to pack up the 
Baggage, Strike the Tents & move off towards the White 
House. 

8 : Orders by Major Grimke. 

Serj'. Ousby will attend at Gen'. Rutherfords Quar- 
ters at 9 oClock & at the Majors at 10 oClock in the Morn- 
ing for Orders, which he will afterwards deliver to Serj". 
of Companies 

A Serj*. is to be Orderly for the week to act as Serj'. 
Major: Should any person plead Ignorance of Orders the 
Orderly Serj*. is to be responsible — 



52 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Commanding Officers of Companies will report what 
number of Musquet Cartridges are wanting to compleat 
the Cartridge Boxes of their respective Companies : Should 
any be missing after compleated, the Officers will be re- 
sponsible; they are therefore to inspect them at Morning 
& Evening Parade & examine their Arms — 

No Soldier is to quit the Camp without having previously 
obtained Leave of the Serj'. afterwards of the Officer 

commanding his Company, & finally of the Major. 

Punishment will be inflicted certainly on those who trans- 
gress. — 

Parole, Countersigns, Peace, Plenty 

9 : Parole, Qubec, Counters'. Quiberoore, Ouibbletown 

lo: Parole, Counters'. 
1 1 : Parole, Counters'. 

A Roll of the Officers of the South Carolina Continental 
regiment of Artillery, with the Dates of their Commissions 

Field Officers & Captains 
Owen Roberts, Col". i6 Sept: 1776 
B. Beckman, L'. CoF. 25 Oct: 1778 
Jn". F. Grimke, Maj'. 25 Oct: 1778 

Captains. 
E. Mitchell i'*. Nov. 1776 
John Detreville 10. Jan'': 1777 
R. B. Roberts 4. June, 1777 
Ja'. Mitchell 11. Sept'. 1777 
H. Davis 6. Jan''. 1778 
Wm. Mitchell 23. Oct". 1778 

Captain Lieutenants. 
John Wickly 28. May 1 778 
Barn'. Elliott 29. May 1778 
John Gorget 30. May 1778 
Ja". Wilson 31. May 1778 
W"\ Dennom i. June 1778 
Tho'. Weaver 25. Octo. 1778 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKE 53 

First Lieut''. 
Basil Jackson 28. May 1778 
]n: S: Budd 29. May 1778 
William Tate 30. May 1778 
Ja,mes Field 12 Oct. 1778 
Hen^ Moore 25. Oct". 1778 
P. F. Platen 31 Oct": 1778 

Staff. 
R. Burke, Surgeon 25 Sept: 1776 
Barn". Elliott Warr*. Adj*. 25 Oct: 1778 
B. Jackson Warr'. Q^ M'. 5. Nov'. 1778. 

Return of the Stores, Ammunition &c. with the Detach- 
ment of Artillery encamped at the Sisters — 7'" March 1779 
15 Round Ball, loose for 4 p'. 
60 Fixed Case Shot for 4 p'. 
60 Fixed round ball for 4 p' 
150 Empty flannel Cart'. 
14 Flannel Cart'. Charged 
I Rammer & Sponge. 

1 Worm. 

100 Fixed Case Shot for 2 p' 
60 Paper Cart'. Charged for d". 
35 Case Shot unfixed for d". 
24 Round Shot loose for d". 
420 Tubes 
9 Port Fires 
3 Lintstocks. 

Match 

5 Priming Horns. 

2 Rammers & Sponges 
I Worm. 

Return of the Detachment of the South-Carolina Conti- 
nental Corps of Artillery encamped at the Sisters. 9'" March 
1779 

Fit for Duty 
I Cadet 

1 0^ M\ Serj\ 

2 Serjeants 



54 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

3 Corporals 
I Drummer 

4 Gunners 

12 Matrosses 
I Matross-Driver 
Sick 
I Matross 
Total — 26. 

Camp at the Sisters 
March 12, 1779. 

Orders by Gen'. Rutherford. 

Parole, Tray — Counters\ Trusty, Time. 
One Gun from the Park of Artillery will be considered 
as an alarm, upon which the Guards & Out Posts will im- 
mediately repair to Camp & join their respective Corps. 
Orders by Major Grimke 
The Alarm to be fired by Cap*. Mitchell. The Companies 
are to be exercised twice a Day according to the regulations 
of the Inspector — The Manual Exercise in the Morning and 
that of the Field piece in the Evening will precede the 
marching. Officers are requested to be attentive. 

13": Parole, Utretch. Counters'. Union, Unity. 

14. Parole, Venice. Counters^ Virtue, Vigilance. 

15. Orders by Gen'. Rutherford. 

Parol, Washington, Countersigns Weane, Wiylic. 
Field-Officer for the Day tomorrow, L*. Col". Brevard — 
Guards as usual excepting the Guard at the Savannah, 
which form a Corp", to a Serj*'. Guard, & be posted on the 
other side the Savannah, which Guard in Case of an Alarm 
will discharge their pieces, retreat & break the Bridges in 
order to impede the progress of the Enemy — A Party of 
4 Light Horse will be detached & take Post where the back 
road leads from M'. Smiths to Turkey-Hill & reconoitre 
the roads from that Post down the Black Swamp & up 
towards Aparichocola ; these Horse will be relived regularly 
as other guards. 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKE 55 

The Commanding Officer at the White House will keep 
a Picqnet Guard at Cypress Creek Bridge, Videtts on the 
Other Side the Bridge. In Case of the Enemys approach 
the Picquet will destroy the Bridge & retreat to their Quar- 
ters — he will also keep a Picquet where the Black swamp & 
river swamp join. A Party of Horse will patrol from the 
camp down to that place — In case of an Alarm the Troops 
will immediately stand to Arms & march off to the Alarm 
Post — Col". Sanders to take Post on the Right by the upper 
Flush, Cor. Lock & CoF. Brevard on the left of the lower 
one — Capt. Nicholas of Col". Locks Reg', with 50 Men will 
take Post on the left of the Greater piece of Artillery & 
Cap'. Jamison with 50 Men from CoF. Sanders's reg'. will 
take Post on the left of the smaller Piece. These officers 
are to make it their particular Business to support the pieces 
of Artillery & receive Orders from Major Grimke for their 
Safety as he shall think fit to direct 

Camp at Two Sisters Ferry 
March 1779 
16: Orders by Gen'. Rutherford. 

Parole, Zenith ; Countersigns, Zubly ; Zeale. 
A Picquet Guard will be detached from the Main Guard 
& take Post at the Narrows between this & Williamson's 
Quarter. It is expected that each officer without Distinc- 
tion will attend the Parade & take their Posts, & continue 
there until discharged. 

17: Orders by Gen\ Rutherford. 

Parole, Ashepoo; Countersigns, Alliance, Assurance. 

No Officer or Soldier Shall pass to the White House or 
from the White House to Camp without written Orders 
from the Commanding Officer — The Sentries are desired to 
examine every person passing & if they are not provided as 
directed they will be put under confinement. 
Orders by Major Grimke. 

The Detachment lately arrived under Capt. L'. Donnom 
is to do Duty — 

The Guard is to be augmented to i Corp'. & 6 Privates & 
is to mount two Centinels — 



56 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

An Officer of the Day is to be appointed: 

He is to confine himself during his Duty the Artillery 
Encampment & preserve Order therein; He will also take 
Care that all Orders are punctually complied with & direct 
the Orderly Serj'. to turn out the Detachments to parade 
according to the Order of the 12*" Inst. & that both Morn- 
ing & Evening they are exercised for two hours each in the 
different Marchings as the Inspector has directed — 

The Officer of the Day will visit the Guard & Centinels 
twice in the Night, be relieved on the Parade when the 
Guard mounts & make his Report very fully. 

Soldiers attending Officers are excused Guard mounting, 
but must turn out to the Morning & Evening Exercises. 

One Driver either of the Artillery or Waggons & one 
Fatigue-man is in future to go for Forage. 

The Fatigue Men will assist the Wagoners in striking 
the Tents & packing the Baggage, whenever an Alarm hap- 
pens. The Or. M : Serj : will consider it as his particular 
Duty to see this order complied with. For Duty today. 
Capt. L'. Donnom. Tomorrow L'. Budd. 

18: Parole, Burke; Countersigns, Bedford, Beaufort. 
Officer of the Day tomorrow, L'. Tate. 

19: Parole, Congress; Countersigns, Continent, County. 
Officer of the Day tomorrow Cap*. L\ Donnom. 

20 : Parole, Dublin ; Countersigns, Destroy, Distress 

Officer of the day tomorrow, L'. Budd. 

H:0: Purisburgh. 20 March, 1779. Orders by Gen: 
Lincoln. 

The Court of Enquiry which was Ordered to Examine 
into the affair of the 3" : Inst* : at Bryar Creek & the Conduct 
of Gen : Ashe relative to his Command, Gen : Moultrie, 
Pres* :, have reported, that They are of Opinion Gen : Ashe 
did not take all the necessary Precautions which Fie ought 
to have done to Secure his Camp & obtain timely Intelligence 
of the Movements & approach of the Enemy ; but They do 
Acquit him of every imputation of a want of Personal 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKE 57 

Courage in the Affair at Bryar* Creek & think He remained 
on the Field as long as Prudence and Duty required him. 

March, 1779 Camp, Two Sisters Ferry 

A Return of the Detachment of the S" Carolina Conti- 
nental Corps of Artillery, encamped at the Two Sisters 
Fery. 

17'' March, 1779. 

Fit for Duty 
I Cadet 

1 Or. M^ Serj'. 

2 Serjeants 
4 Corporals 
2 Drummers 
4 Gunners 
16 Matross 

I Matross Driver 

Sick in Camp 

1 Serjeant 

2 Gunners 

2 Matrosses 

Sick in Hospital 
I Matross 
Total — 37. 

21 : Morning Orders by Major Grimke. 

The Detachment will be mustered this Morning by Col" : 
Mosley : The Officers & Men will parade at ten oClock pre- 
cisely — before their Tents ; the Men to be drawn up accord- 
ing to the List of their Names upon the Muster Rolls — 

G : O : Parole, Europe, Countersigns, Edinburgh ; Ebe- 
nezar. 

R. O. Officer of the Day tomorrow, Liut Tate. 

22 : Orders by Major Grimke. 

The Two oldest Officers present with the Detachment are 
always without Exception to take Command of the two 
Field Pieces — 

=^See this Magazine vol. 14, p. 222, for an account of the Amer- 
ican defeat at Briar Creek; also Annals of the Kings Rifle Corps, 
vol. l;"Royal Americans", pp. 212, 318 for a British account. 



58 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Officer of the Day tomorrow. Cap*. U. Donnom. 
Parole, Frances; Countersigns Freedom, Fidelity 

2^ : Orders by Major Grimke 

Mr. Thomas Listen, Cadet, is appointed to act as Adju- 
tant to this Detachment. He is therefore to be obeyed & 
respected as such. 

Officer of the Day tomorrow — Lieu'. Budd. 
Orders by Gen'. Rutherford. 

Parole, Countersigns 

Every charged Gun in Camp to be discharged this Even- 
ing at 5 oClock, as it was postponed yesterday Evening for 
some reasons. 

No Gentry or Picquet will fire on their Post. 

24: Sir — You will march your Troops half after 10 
oClock — Cap*. Jimison will march in your front & Cap*. 
Nicholls in your rear the Pieces in the Centre. 

G. Rutherford, B. G. 
Major Grimke. 

Parole Countersigns 

March 1779 Camp near the Two Sisters 

24: Major Grimke infomis Cap*. Jamieson that should 
an alarm happen his Post of Parade will be along the Ridge 
of the Hill on which the Artillery is encamped, paralell with 
the Road, on the Flank of the Redoubt, 

Camp near the Sisters — 
March 24*\ 1779 

Major Grimke informs Cap*. Nicholls that should an 
alarm happen his Post of Parade will be on the right of the 
redoubt, in which the Artillery is encamped.. 

Camp near the Sisters 
March 24*" 1779 

Officer of the Day tomorrow — L*. Tate. 

25 : Sir — You will hold your Detachment in readiness to 
march on the earliest Notice G. Rutherford, B : G. 

Major Grimke. 

Parole Countersign 

Officer of the Day tomorrow. Cap*. L*. Donnom. 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKE 59 

26 : Parole Countersigns 

Officer of the Day tomorrow Lieut*. Budd. 

2y : Camp at M'. Middleton's Plantation. 

Parole, Countersigns. 

Officer of the Day tomorrow, Lieut*. Tate. 

28 : Parole Countersigns 

Officer of the Day tomorrow, Cap*. L*. Donnom. 

29 : Parole Countersigns 

Officer of the Day tomorrow Lieut*. Budd. 

30 : Parole Countersigns 

Officer of the Day tomorrow, Lieut*. Tate. 

3 1 : Parole Countersigns 

Officer of the Day tomorrow — Cap*. L*. Donnom, 

[To he continued.') 



HISTORICAL NOTES. - 

A REVIEW OF The Life and Letters of Harrison Gray Otis, 
Federalist, by samuel eliot morison, ph. d. (harv.), 
HOUGHTON MIFFLIN CO., 1913. — This book is particularly 
interesting because it once again outlines the sharp changes 
in the political attitude of New England towards funda- 
mental principles of the Constitution of the United States 
between its adoption in 1787 and the death of Mr. Otis in 
1848. 

The author has been very frank in his treatment of this 
subject, and has not hesitated to define clearly the attitude 
of the dominant party of his section towards both secession 
and nullification. 

Those of us, who remember the discussions in i860 as to 
whether the Southern States should secede by separate 
State action or by co-operative action, will be reminded 
that we did then but repeat the arguments propounded in 
New England between 1794 and 181 5, at which latter date 
the movement culminated in the Hartford Convention. 

Once again does this book remind us of Pickering's ad- 
vocacy of secession (1803-1804), and of Josiah Quincy's 
unanswerable vindication of the same right, when he de- 
clared in Congress in 181 1 that the admission of Louisiana 
would be "virtually a dissolution of the Union," and that it 
would be the duty of some of the States to prepare for a 
separation — ''amicably if they can, violently if they must." 

As to nullification, we read (Vol. II, page 12), that in 
1809 the right of the State legislature of Massachusetts to 
nullify the Embargo and Force Acts "was freely asserted 
in terms scarcely differing from Calhoun's 'Exposition' of 
1828." The passage by Kentucky and Virginia of resolu- 
tions nullifying the Alien and Sedition Acts, written by 
Jefferson and Madison respectively, is dealt with, but the 
nullification of the Constitution of the United States by no 
less than fourteen of the Northern States at a later date 
hardly falls within the scope of the book. 

The chapters on the attitude of Otis to the question of 
slavery are quite interesting. When in 1800, John Rut- 



HISTORICAL NOTES 61 

ledge demanded that there should be thrown under the 
table a petition praying Congress to prepare the way for a 
general emancipation, Otis stated clearly his then opinion : 
"I think the subject ought not to be meddled with by the 
General Government, and, if any grievances exist, they are 
properly and only subjects of legislation in the several 
States." 

The views of Otis on the efforts of Garrison and the 
abolitionists to incite servile insurrection induced him to 
speak out clearly in 183 1, in Boston, against the assertion 
of a right to combine "to spread disaffection in other States, 
and poison the sweet fountains of domestic safety and 
comfort." 

While stating clearly the opinions of Otis, even where at 
different times they varied, the biographer does not hesitate 
to express his own difference of view; but this is always 
done in such a way that the reader's mind is not led off to 
argumentative resentment, even though he would like to 
record a distinct dissent. 

There are numerous pictures of the social life of the 
period, and perhaps a too free use is made of the word 
"aristocratic," which is without meaning in America. Here 
it is generally used to describe the man who has a better 
education and better manners than the majority, entirely 
without reference to his power in government. Yet, when 
as far back as 1804 "the aristocratic democrats of the 
South" are spoken of, it is easy to see how the word may 
be perverted into an unmeaning term of opprobrium when 
used objectively, or into an equally meaningless claim of 
superiority when used subjectively. 

The book contains among others some interesting letters 
from John Rutledge, Benjamin F. Hunt, and Robert Y. 
Hayne, and much other material heretofore inaccessible. 

This biography will be of value to every student of the 
period and of interest to readers generally. It should be in 
every library. (Contributed by D. E. Hugcr Suiith.) 



LIST OF PUBLICATIONS 



OF THH 



SOUTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 

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Vol L, 1857, $3.00; Vol II., 1858, $3.00; Vol. Ill, 
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PAMPHLETS. 

Journal of a Voyage to Charlestown in So. Caro- 
lina by Pelatiah Webster in 1765. Edited by Prof. T. 
P. Harrison, 1898. 75c. 

The History of the Santee Canal. By Prof. F. A. 
Porcher. With an Appendix by A. S. Salley, Jr., 1903. 

75c. 

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GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE. 

Volume I, 1900, Edited by A. S. Salley, Jr. Complete 

Volume. $10.00 

Single copies of Nos. 2-4, $1.25 each. 

Volume II to IX, 1901-1908, Edited by A. S. Salley, Jr. 

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Webber. Unbound $5.00 each. 

Members get a discount of 25 per cent, on the above 

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Address: South Carolina Historical Society, 

Charleston, S. C. 



THE 
SOUTH CAROLINA 

HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 
MAGAZINE 




PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY THE 

SOUTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



VOLUME XV.. NO. 2. 



APRIL. 1914, 



Entered at the Post-office at Charleston, S. C, aa 
Second-Class Matter. 



Pbinted for the Society by 

WAUKER, EVANS A COOSWELL CO 

CHARI.ESTON, S. C. 

1914 



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE. 

Joseph W. Barnwell, Henry A. M. Smith, 

A. S. Salley, Jr. 

EDITOR OF THE MAGAZINE. 
Mabel L. Webber. 



CONTENTS. 

Baronies of South Carolina 63 

South Carolina Almanacs 73 

Order Book of John F. Grimke 82 

South Carolina Gleanings in England 91 

Register of St. Andrew's Parish 97 

Childsbury 107 



N. B. — These Magazines, with the exception of No. i 
of Vol. I, are $1.25 to any one other than a member of the 
South Carolina Historical Society. Members of the So- 
ciety receive them free. The Membership fee is $4.00 per 
annum (the fiscal year being from January to January), 
and members can buy back numbers or duplicates at $1.00 
each. In addition to receiving the Magazines, members are 
allowed a discount of 25 per cent, on all other publications 
of the Society, and have the free use of the Society's library. 

Any member who has not received the last number 
will please notify the Secretary and Treasurer, 

Miss Mabel L. Webber, 

South Carolina Historical Society, 

Charleston, S. C. 



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE. 

Joseph W. Barnwell, Henry A. M. Smith, 

A. S. Salley, Jr. 

EDITOR OF THE MAGAZINE. 
Mabel L. Webber. 



CONTENTS. 

Baronies of South Carolina 63 

South Carolina Almanacs 73 

Order Book of John F. Grimke 82 

South Carolina Gleanings in England 91 

Register of St. Andrew's Parish 97 

Childsbury 107 



N. B. — These Magazines, with the exception of No. i 
of Vol. I, are $1.25 to any one other than a member of the 
South Carolina Historical Society. Members of the So- 
ciety receive them free. The Membership fee is $4.00 per 
annum (the fiscal year being from January to January), 
and members can buy back numbers or duplicates at $1.00 
each. In addition to receiving the Magazines, members are 
allowed a discount of 25 per cent, on all other publications 
of the Society, and have the free use of the Society's library. 

Any member who has not received the last number 
will please notify the Secretary and Treasurer, 

Miss Mabel L. Webber, 

South Carolina Historical Society, 

Charleston, S. C. 




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The South Carolina 

Historical and Genealogical 

Magazine. 

VOL. XV. April, 1914. No. 2. 

THE BARONIES OF SOUTH CAROLINA. 
By Henry A. M. Smith. 



XIV. 



ASHEPOO BARONY. 



The Ashepoo Barony although granted as a barony and 
granted to a Landgrave entitled to hold a barony yet as in 
the case of Boon's Barony' did not contain the full 12,000 
acres properly required to constitute a barony, being only 
for 6,000 acres. It was granted to Landgrave Edmund 
Bellinger, an account of the date of the granting of whose 
patent was given in the article on the Tomotley Barony in 
a previous number of this magazine.' 

So far as the writer has ascertained from the record it 
does not appear from what part of England Edmund Bel- 
linger came. He first appears in the Province about 1692 
and is then styled "Captain." He had a brother, Richard 
Bellinger, who appeared in the Province about 1694 and 
who must have died about 1700, as on 10 May, 1700, Ed- 
mund Bellinger gives bond as administrator of Richard 
Bellinger's estate.^ There also .appears upon the record a 

'S. C. Hist: & Gen: Mag: vol. 13, p. 71. 
-Tbid, vol. 15, p. 9. 
'Ibid, vol. 12, p. 72. 



64 so. c:a. kistokical and genealogical magazine 

bond given 15 jany, 1699- 1700, by Elizabeth Bellinger with 
Edmund Bellinger as one of her sureties for the administra- 
tion by Elizabeth Bellinger of the estate of John Bellinger.' 
But who this John Bellinger was does not seem to appear 
upon the record. In a letter from Col. James Moore to the 
Governor of South Carolina, giving an account of the mil- 
itary expedition of Moore against the Appalachian Indians 
in 1703-4, as published in Carroll's Historical Collections, 
vol. 2, p. 574, he says: "Capt John Bellinger fighting 
"bravely at the head of our men was killed at my foot." 
This Capt : John Bellinger was supposed to have had some 
connection with the Landgrave. This it now appears was 
a m.istake. The original letter dated 16 April, 1704, is 
among the State Paper Records in London, and the tran- 
script procured some .20 years ago and now in Columbia 
(Public Records of S. C. London MSS. vol. 19. p. 145) 
shov.'s that the correct reading is Capt : John Berringer and 
not Bellinger. Further, as he was killed in 1704, he could 
not be this John Bellinger, whose estate was administered 
in 1 699- 1 700. On 17 May, 1701, a grant was made to 
John Berringer for i ,800 acres, ' which by his will he devised 
to his sister, Mary Berringer, ^^■ho subsequently married 
Robert Bishop and with her husband conveyed it to John 
Gibbes.' This tract afterwards as the property of the Hon. 
VViiliami Middleton was his estate in St. James Goose Creek 
called Crowfield and well known for its fine brick mansion 
and beautiful grounds and srardens. In the life of Eliza 
Lucas, by M". St. Jnlien Ivavenel, is a letter from Miss 
Lucas, giving an account of the place and of her stay there. 
On 20 Febry, 1701. letters of administration are granted to 
John Berringer on the estate of Col. John (or Jehu'i Ber- 
ringer of Barbadoes. and it is likely that it was the John 
Berringer mentioned in the grant of the land and of this 
administration who was the Capt: John Berringer killed on 
Moore's expedition. 

This leaves undetermined who v/as the John Bellinger 
on whose estate Elizabeth Bellinger administered in 1609- 



^TlvV], vol. 10, V. 243. 

■'Off: Secv. State, vol. 38. p. 393. 

"Off: Hist: Com": Memo: Bk. 7, p. 98. 



THE BARONIES OF SOUTH CAROLINA 65 

1 700. He couid not well have been the son of Edmund 
Bellinger. He may have been a son of Richard Bellinger or 
may have been another brother of Edmund and Richard. 

The first grant of land appearing on the record to Ed- 
mund Bellinger is dated 17 July, 1694. It is to "Capt" 
Edmund Bellinger for 17 acres on the East side of Cooper 
River knov;n then (as it still is) as "Hogg Island.'" 

The next is dated 14 March, 1694/5 for 20 acres on the 
Southwest side of Tttawan Island" (novv- knovv-n as Daniell's 
Island'). 

On 8 Sept'., 1697, a grant vras made to him of 1,000 acres" 
which was on the East side of Wando River." His patent 
as Landgrave vvSls made 7 May, 1698, and on 28 Aug., 1701, 
a grant was made to him as "Landgrave Edmund Bellinger" 
of 1,290 acres on Stono River near New Cut." It was from 
this tract that subsequently 30 acres was given to the Parish 
of St. Paul for the construction of a Church.'' This 1,290 
acres altho' granted to him designating him as "Landgrave" 
does not appear to have been granted as any part of the 
48,000 acres under his Landgrave's patent. The first grant 
under the patent was dated 12 Deer, 1702, and after reciting 
the patent to him as Landgrave, proceeds : 

"We whose Names are here under Written Do give & 
grant unto the Said Landgrave Edmund Bellinger a Plan- 
tation or Barrony Containing Six thousand acres of Land 
English measure now in the possession of the S". Land- 
grave Edmund Bellinger scituate Lying in Colleton County 
& butting & bounding as appears by a Piatt thereof here- 
unto annexed as part of y' Said fforty eight thousand 
acres." 
There is no plat annexed, but there is a copy of the 
surve3^or's certificate dated 20 Sept'.. 1701. stating that the 
land was "Lying & being on the South Side of y' head of 
"Ashepoo River."" 



■Oft": 


Secv. 


St 


ate. 


Ek. 


38. 


P- 


151 


■^Off: 


Sec3^ 


Q*- 


ate, 


Bk. 


38. 


P- 


282. 


nbid 


p. .I.- 


.2 













"'.S. C. Hist: & Gen: Ma?: vol. 10. d. 238. 
"Ofi'- Secy. State, Bk. 38, p. 404. 
'-S. C. Hist. & Gen. Mag: vol. 11, p. 72. 
•''Off: Hist. Com"., Ek. F, p. 40. 



66 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

The first Landgrave died leaving, according to the recitals 
in some deeds, a will dated lo'" October, 1705. There ap- 
pears to be no copy of this Will on record nor any evidence 
showing the exact date of his death. There is on record a 
bond dated 31 Jany, 1709/10 given by Elizabeth Bellinger 
with Sam' Eveleigh as surety for the administration by 
Elizabeth Bellinger of the estate of Edmund Bellinger, Esq. 
deceased." If this referred to the first Landgrave, it might 
give approximately the date of his death, but there are a 
number of circumstances that would appear to the contrary. 
It is a bond for administration when he appears to have 
left a will : it does not refer to him by his title as Landgrave 
and as he left sons one of them should more naturally have 
administered, as it does not appear whether the Elizabeth 
who administered was his wife or daughter. At the same 
time there is no other known Edmund Bellinger to whom it 
may refer — the Executors named in the Will (if any were 
named) may have all died or refused to act, and his sons 
may in 1709 have been under age. 

If the Edmund Bellinger referred to in this administra- 
tion was the first Landgrave then it is likely that the Eliza- 
beth was his widow. There appears upon the record two 
grants to an Edmund Bellinger, dated i May, 1708, one for 
226 acres at the head of Ashepoo River, bounding East on 
Landgrave Bellinger's Barony, and another for 224 acres 
at the head of Ashepoo River.'" These grants are stated in 
the Memorial of the second Landgrave, made in 1733," to 
have been granted to him and not to his father. If so he 
should have been of age in 1709. According to this me- 
morial the barony of 6,000 acres was devised by the first 
Landgrave to his son Thomas and at the latter's death it 
went to the second Landgrave, his eldest brother and heir 
at law. Exactly who were the descendants of the first 
Landgrave Edmund Bellinger it is very difficult to ascertain 
from the record. He seems to have certainly left a son, 
Edmund the second Landgrave, another son, Thomas, who 
died early and without issue, and another son, William, 

"Probate Ct. Charleston. Bk. 1716-1721, p. 140. 
"Off: Secv. State, vol. 39, n. 30. 
"Off: Hist: Com". Memo Bk. 3, p. 137 



I 



THE BARONIES OF SOUTH CAROLINA 67 

afterwards Capt : William Bellinger. He also had at least 
a daughter Margaret, who married Nicholas Bohun, the son 
of Edmund Bohun, the first Chief Justice of the Province, 
and a daughter, Elizabeth, who married John Palmer. He 
seems to have had another daughter, Lucia, who married 
Burnaby Ball, and has been credited with another daughter, 
Anne, who married Richard Fairchild. The record, how- 
ever, while indicating that Anne was some connection does 
not seem clear that she was a daughter. If the John Bell- 
inger upon whose estate administration was granted in 1699- 
1700, was a brother, then the Elizabeth to whom adminis- 
tration was granted may have been his wife, and the Ed- 
mund upon whose estate Elizabeth administered in 1709 
may have been his son and a brother of Anne Fairchild. 

The second Landgrave Edmund Bellinger seems, accord- 
ing to this memorial to have acquired the barony intact. 
He died in 1739, leaving a will which cannot now be found 
upon the record. At the time of his death he seems, accord- 
ing to the memorial mentioned, to have possessed the fol- 
lowing lands in one body on the Ashepoo, viz : 

The baron}^ 6,000 acres 

Grant i May, 1708, to 2" Landgrave 226 " 

224 " 
Tract run out under the patent for i'* Landgrave 640 " 

Total 7,710" " 

The barony of 6,000 acres v/as the only tract distinctively 
run out for a barony to the first Landgrave. According to 
a statement contained in a deed made by the widow and 
Executrix of the second Landgrave in 1747,'' this 6,000 
acres was all that the first Landgrave ran out under the 
patent, the remainder of the 48,000 acres having been run 
out by the second Landgrave, but this seems contradicted 
by the memorial just mentioned. The Tomotley Barony 
of 13,000 acres was according to a statement made on a 

"Off: Hist. Com": Memo: Bk. 3, p. 137. 
''M. C. O. Charleston. Book P, p 71. 



68 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

plat annexed to a deed made by the same Widovv and 
Executrix in 1743" run out in 1728 to the second Land- 
grave. 

This 7,710 acres seems to have been disposed of as fol- 
lovv's : The wnll of the second Landgrave is no longer extant 
but his widow in 1747 recorded her memorial purporting to 
show the disposition of the 4,800 acres run out under the 
patent.'" From this it appears that of the lands at Ashepoo : 

There was devised to Edmund Bellinger 

the third Landgrave 2,267 acres 

To George Bellinger son of 2"* Landgrave 2,485 " 

To William Webb had been issued (not stated in 
the memorial to be at Ashepoo, but so appear- 
ing in the plats) 1,000 " 

Set apart to W"'. Bellinger son of 2" Landgrave 

in the division of the Estate 977 " 

Set apart to Elizabeth daughter of 2"^ Landgrave 

in do ..- 977 " 

Total 7,706 " 

The 1,000 acres of William Webb appears to have been 
procured by him as follows: In 1734, Peter Girardeau and 
Elizabeth his wife conveyed to William Webb 500 acres on 
Ashepoo, and in 1738 Richard Baker conveys to Webb an- 
other 500 acres adjoining the first mentioned. These deeds 
(or the last) recite that Edmund Bellinger the first Land- 
grave, by his will, devised to his daughter, Margaret, the 
wife of Nicholas Bohun, 1,000 acres at Ashepoo: that 
Margaret Bohun left two daughters, Mary and Elizabeth, 
who after the death of Nicholas and Margaret Bohun mar- 
ried, Mary to Richard Baker and Elizabeth to Peter Gir- 
ardeau, and that the two daughters having become vested 
with the 1. 000 acres as the heirs of their mother, divided it 
500 acres to each. On Margaret Baker's death her 500 
acres went to her husband for life, with reversions to her 

'"Tbid. Rk. A. A., p. 74. 

-"Off: Hist Com". Memo. Bk. 7, p. 481. 



THE BARONIES OF SOUTrl CAROLINA 69 

eldest son, William Baker. These two sales thus passed the 
whole 1,000 acres to Webb. From this marriage, between 
Richard Baker and Mary Bohun the name Bohun was in- 
troduced in the Baker Family of Ashley River. Nicholas 
Bohun who married Margaret Bellinger was the son of the 
Chief Justice Edmund Bohun, who died in 1699. As the 
second Landgrave's Memorial mentions the entire 6,000 
acre barony as having come to him, this i.ooo acres must 
have been included in the two other tracts mentioned as 
run out under the patent for 640 and 620 acres respectively."* 

Elizabeth the daughter of the second Landgrave married 
Thomas Wright and thereafter died wdthout issue so that 
her 977 acres descended to her brother Edmund as her heir 
at lavs'." In the excellent account of the three first genera- 
tions of the Bellingers, written by M'. A. S. Salley, J'., and 
published in the "State" newspaper 12 December, 1909, and 
given with the care and accuracy characteristic of M'. Salley 
he does not mention Thomas, or Elizabeth who married John 
Palmer, among the children of the first Landgrave, nor 
Elizabeth among the children of the second Landgrave, but 
this is because, as M'. Salley is careful to say, that he men- 
tions only what in the course of his own researches he has 
happened to find record of. 

There is an account of the Bellingers published in a pam- 
phlet styled "A Llistory and Genealogy of the Families of 
Bellinger and De Veaux, and other Families," by D'. Joseph 
G. Bulloch, published in 1895. This pamphlet gives no au- 
thorities for its statements and much of the matter contained 
in it is so contradicted by the record and so hypothetical and 
unsupported by any reliable authority, as well as confused 
and inconsistent that it is not to be relied on as safe au- 
thority. The author is no doubt v/ell meaning and zealous 
and has given oral information and tradition as imparted 
to him, supplemented by a good deal of surmise, but he has 
not followed the true methods of the study of genealogy 
upon modern scientific lines. 

The land of Landgrave Bellinger at the Ashepoo, or at 
least the Barony part of it, seems, according to some of the 

-^M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. M. M., pp. 108 and 111. 
"Ibid, Bk. H. N°. 4, p. 216. 



70 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

deeds, to have been known during the time of the second 
Landgrave as the ''Oketies'' or "Oketys." 

In 1768 the third Landgrave seems to have sold the 977 
acres he had inherited from his sister Elizabeth to Barnard 
Elliott in whose hands it became known as "Bellevue.'"^ 

It was on this plantation that Col. Barnard Elliott before 
the revolutionary war erected the "temple" of which M'. 
William Elliott in his Carolina Sports gives the following 
account in the chapter on "A day at Chee-Ha." 

"The traveller in South Carolina, who passes along the 
"road between the Ashepoo and Combahee rivers will be 
"struck by the appearance of two lofty white columns, rising 
"among the pines that skirt the road. They are the only 
"survivors of eight, which supported in times anterior to 
"our revolutionary war, a sylvan temple, erected by a gen- 
"tleman, who to the higher qualities of a devoted patriot, 
"united the taste and liberality of the sportsman. The spot 
"was admirably chosen, being on the brow of a piney ridge, 
"which slopes away at a long gun-shot's length into a thick 
"swamp ; and many a deer has, we doubt not, in times past, 
"been shot from the temple when it stood in its pride — as 
"we ourselves have struck them from its ruins." 

All of the columns are now fallen and even the bricks 
have been largely removed. 

Col : Barnard Elliott was the son of Barnard Elliott and 
grandson of William Elliott and his wife, Katherine 
Schencking, daughter of Bernard Schencking, from whom 
the name Bernard, or as later Barnard, came into the Elliott 
family. Col : Elliott had early taken an active part in the 
military preparation for the revolutionary war. From Cap- 
tain he had advanced, until at his death, 25 October, 1778, 
he was Lieut : Col : of the Regiment of Artillery on the 
Continental Establishment in the State. In 1766 he had 
married Mary Bellinger Elliott'* which marriage formed the 
fourth in direct succession of as many ladies who had be- 
come M". Elliotts. Shem Butler of Ashley Ferry left a 
widow, Esther Butler, who married William Elliott." 

''Ibid. 

"^S. C. Hist: & Gen: Mag., vol XI, p. 60. 

"Ibid, vol. XIV. p. 205. 



THE BARONIES OF SOUTH CAROLINA 71 

Esther Butler had a daughter Ehzabeth Butler. It should 
he said presuniably had, i. e. Shem Butler left a daughter, 
Elizabeth, and whilst she was presumably the daughter of 
his widow, Esther, yet it is not safe to say in genealogical 
inquiry that the children of a man may not have been of a 
previous marriage, unless the evidence is positive. 

This Elizabeth Butler married Edmund Bellinger the sec- 
ond Landgrave and after his death she married Thomas 
Elliott.'' Then Mary Bellinger the daughter of Landgrave 
Bellinger and his wife Elizabeth married Thomas Elliott, 
known as Thomas Law Elliott, and their daughter Mary 
Bellinger Elliott married Col. Barnard Elliott. Quite a puz- 
zling succession for a genealogist. 

The lands at Ashepoo continued to be held by the Bellinger 
family by descents, gifts and devises for many years, but 
gradually a large part was disposed of. In 1768, as we have 
seen, 977 acres was transferred to Barnard Elliott. In 1785 
284 acres were sold by John Bellinger to John Hull.'' 

In 1 79 1, 560 acres were sold by George Bellinger to 
William Cotesworth Pinckney"^ and in 1800 he also sold 
320 acres to Peter Bohun Postell.'* In 1800, John Bellinger 
sold to Richard Jenkins 307 acres.'^ In 1804, Joseph Bell- 
inger conveyed to J. H. Girardeau 1,150 acres,^ and in 1809 
D^ John Bellinger conveyed to D\ John Parker Gough 537 
acres.'' 

The destruction of the records of Colleton County during 
the late war makes the examination of the conveyances of 
the parts of the barony impossible. A portion of it con- 
tinued in the possession of a Bellinger until after i860, so 
that as to a portion of the barony it continued in the same 
name from the grant in 1702 until after i860. 

There is no general plan of the barony as granted that the 
writer has ever seen. The plat annexed to this article is 
made up from plats of different parts of the barony annexed 

=^"5. C. Hist: & Gen: Mag: vol. 11, p. 59. 

-'M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. O. 5, 345. 

''Ibid, Bk. B., N". 7, p. 3. 

-'^'Ibid, Bk. B., N". 7, p. 57. 

''"Ibid, Bk. C. 7, p. 27. 

""Ibid, Bk. M. N". 7, p. 333. 

^Ibid, Bk. Y, N". 7, p. 281. 



72 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

to partition and other deeds. They represent apparently all 
the land the first and second Landgraves had in one con- 
tiguous body at that point. The solid black lines denote 
the original lines of the barony as near as can be inferred 
from descriptions in deeds referring to original lines, and 
they are probably correct. 



SOUTH CAROLINA ALMANACS. 

To 1 800. 

Compiled by Mabel L. Webber. 

The following is a list of such South Carolina Almanacs 
down to 1800, as are known to be accessible in Charleston. 

A list of so much of their contents as relates to South 
Carolina is given, and also the names of the libraries in 
which they may be found. 

The first almanac printed in South Carolina, was Tobler's 
for 1752, according to the following advertisement in the 
Soidh CGroluia Gazette for December 6, 1751. 

"Ji-ist Published, and to be sold by the Printer 
hereof, The South Carolina Almanack for the year 
1752. By John Tobler of New-Windsor, Math. 
Wherein the Stile &c. is altered agreeable to a late act of 
Parliament." 

The contents are given, and besides the usual things, 
there is a "Gardners Kalander, done by a Lady of this 
Province and esteemed a very good one." 

The following note is added to the advertisement : 

'Tf this should meet wdth a favourable Reception (which 
we hope it will as it is the first calculated in and for this 
Province, and printed in it) a Continuance may be ex- 
pected, and useful additions and Improvements (with 
Divine Permission ) from 

The Author and Printer." 

1756 The South-Carolina Almanack, for . . . 1756: . . . 

by John Tobler. . . . Germantown : . . . Printed 
by Christopher Sower, and sold in Charles-Town, 
South-Carolina by Jacob Viart. . . . 12 1. 

(So. Ca. Hist'l. Soc.) 
Contents, Courts in S. C. Road tables. 

1757 The South-Carolina Almanack, for . . . 1757: . . . 

by John Tobler. . . . Germantown : . . . Printed 
by Christopher Sower, and sold in Charles-Town, 
South-Carolina by Jacob Viart. . . . 12 1. 

(So. Ca. Hist'l. Soc.) 
Contents : Courts. Road-table. 



74 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

1758. The South-Carolina Almanack, for . . . 1758: . . . 
by J ohn Tobler. . . . Germantown : . . . Printed 
by Christopher Sower : and sold in Charles-Town, 
South-Carolina, by Jacob V^iart. 16 1. 

(So. Ca. Hist'l. Soc.) 
Contents. Courts. Road table. 

1760. The South-Carolina Almanack and Register for . . . 
1760; containing an ephemeris fitted to the meri- 
dian of Charleston : ... by George Andrews. 
Charlestown : Printed by Robert Wells. 

(Owned by Miss Elizabeth Hey ward Jervey. ) 

1762. [The South-Carolina Register for 1762] 

15 1. title page missing. 

(So. Ca. Hist'l. Soc.) 
Contents. Parishes of S. C. Stages and distances 
from Charleston. Lists of public, military and 
Civil officers, Pilots, pilots fees. Holidays and 
Court days. Bounties, current money, and interest 
in S. C. 

1763. The South-Carolina Almanack and Register, . . . for 

1 763 : ... by George Andrews. . . . Charles Town : 
Printed by Robert Wells. ... 24 1. 

(So. Ca. Hist'l. Soc.) 
Contents. Public officers. Members of the Com- 
mons House of Assembly. Courts. Attornies. 
Notaries. Lists of the customs, military forts 
and garrisons, and civil officers. Fortifications. 
Pilots. Indian traders. Hemp and Lidigo in- 
spectors. Scout beats. Bounties. Holidays and 
Court days. Societies. Duties on imports and 
exports. Parishes. Stage distances. Tide-table. 

1765 The South-Carolina & Georgia Almanack, . . . for 
1 765 ... by John Tobler. . . Charlestown : Printed 
by R. Wells and D. Bruce. 16 1. 

(So. Ca. Hist'l. Soc.) 
Contents. Public officers. Road table. Tide table. 



SOUTH CAROLINA ALMANACS 75 

1765 [South-Carolina Almanack for 1765 ; by George An- 

drews] 25 1. title page missing 

(Charleston Library Society) 
Contents. Public officers. Members of Commons 
House of Assembly. Courts. Commissioners for 
holding Courts of Admiralty. Officers of Cus- 
toms. Officers of the three Companies of Royal 
Americans Stationed in S. C. and Georgia. Forts 
and garrisons. Attornies, with dates of their ad- 
mission in the Court of Common Pleas. Justices 
of Peace. Hemp inspectors. Bounties. Com- 
missioners of Fortifications. Pilots & their fees. 
Street Commissioners, and Constables in Charles- 
ton. Holidays, Court days. Duties in ports. 
Parishes. Stages and distances. Societies. Rates 
of Porterage. 

1766 The South-Carolina and Georgia Almanack, for . . , 

1766: ... by John Tobler. . . Charleston: Printed 
by Robert Wells. 16 1. 

(Charleston Library Society) 
Contents. Public officers. 

1768. The South-Carolina & Georgia Almanack, for . . . 
1768 ... by John Tobler. . . . Charles Town: 
Printed for the editor by Robert Wells. ... 16 1. 
(Charleston Library Society) 
Contents. Road table. Tide table . 

1769 The South-Carolina and Georgia Almanack, for , . . 
1 769 : ... by John Tobler. . . . Charlestown : 
Printed for the editor by Robert Wells. 16 1. 

(Charleston Library Society) 
Contents. Public officers. Members of the Com- 
mons House of Assembly elected Oct. 4 & 5, 1768. 
Tide table. 

1770. The South-Carolina and Georgia Almanack, for . . . 
1769: ... by John Tobler. . . . Charlestown: 
Printed for the editor by Robert Wells. 16 1. 



76 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

(Charleston Library Society and So. Ca. Historical Society) 
Contents. Courts. Resolutions of the inhabitants of 
S. C, July 22, 1769. Tide table. 

1 771. The Georgia Almanack . . . for 1771, . . . by John 
Tobler. Charlestown : Printed for the editor 
... by Robert Wells. 16 1. 

(So. Ca. Historical Society.) 
Contents. An Essay by a Freeholder of South Caro- 
lina, on the very important subjects no^^" in debate 
between Great Britain and her Colonies. 

1774. The South-Carolina and Georgia Almanack, for . . . 
1 774 : ... by John Tobler. . . . Charlestown : 
Printed for the editor by Robert Wells. 16 1. 

(So. Ca. Historical Society) 
Contents. Road table. Public officers. Members of 
the Commons House of Assembly. 

1774 Well's Register: together with an Almanack ... by 
George Andrews . . . for . . . 1774. Charlestown: 
Printed by Robert Wells. 96 pp. 12 ed. 

(So. Ca. Historical Society) 
Contents. Public officers. Members of Commons 
Plouse of iA,s5embly. Courts. Customs. ]\Iilitary 
officers. Church commissioners. Free School com- 
missioners. Pilots. Street commissioners. To- 
bacco and flour inspectors. Justices of Peace. 
Attornies. Notaries. Charleston watch. Boun- 
ties. General & additional bounty on imports and 
exports. Rates of carterage, porterage, wharfage, 
and weighing and storage. Division of province 
into Districts ; also sheriffs, coroners, clerks of 
Circuit Courts, etc. Division of Pro^'ince into 
Counties and parishes. Ministers of the Church 
of Fngland. ?\Iinisters oT the Established Church 
of Scotland. Ships of War. l.egal interest. Table 
of assize of bread. Table of weights and value 
of coins in S. C. Also a page and a half of gen- 
eral statistics relating to S. C. 



SOUTH CAROLINA ALMANACS 77 

1775 The South-Carolina and Georgia Ahiianack, for . . . 

1775: ... by John Tobler. Charleston: Printed 
for the editor ... by Robert Wells ... 14 1. 
(Charleston Library Society) 
Contains no S. C. data. 

1776 The South-Carolina and Georgia Almanack, for 1776 

... by John Tobler. . . . Charleston : Printed for 
the editor . . . by Robert Wells. 16 1. 
(So. Ca. liist'l. and the Charleston Library Society) 

The copy in the Library has 4 1. missing at the end. 

Contains no local data. 

1777 The South-Carolina and Georgia Almanack for . . 

1777: ... by John Tobler. . . . Charlestown : 
Printed and sold by [Robert Wells]. 
12 1. t. p. imperfect 

(Charleston Library Society) 
Contents. Road tables. 

1778. The South-Carolina and Georgia Almanack for . . . 

1778 . . . : by John Tobler. . . . Charlestown : 
Printed . . . by Robert Wells ^^c Son . . . 8 1. Ln- 
perfect at the end. 

(Charleston Library Society.) 
Contents. Tide table. Table of S. C. Currency. 
Road table. Courts/'' 

1779- [The South Carolina and Georgia Almanack for . . . 

1779 ... by John Tobler. . . . Charlestown: 
Printed by Wells.] 15 1. t. p. missing. 

(Charleston Library Society) 
Contents. Caesar's cure for Poison, for discovering 
which the Assembly of S. C. purchased his Free- 
dom and gave him an annuity of 100 Pounds. 
Road table. Dollars reduced to S. C. Currency. 
Table of interest. Tide table. 

*The t. p. says that this A. contains Moses Lindo's receipt for 
Dying, but it is missing from this copy. 



78 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

1780 The South-Carolina and Georgia Almanack for . . . 
1780: ... by John Tobler. . . . Charlestown : 
Printed by John Wells Jun. ... 10 1. 
(Charleston Libr'y. Soc. and S. C. Historical Soc.) 

[Both copies imperfect at the end.] 
Contents. Road table. Table of Interest. Tide table. 

1 78 1. The South-Carolina and Georgia Almanack for . . . 

1 78 1 . . . by John Tobler. . . . Charlestown: 
Printed by John Wells Jr. . . . 18 1. 

[Copy in C. L. S. very imperfect.] 

(So. Ca. Hist'l. Soc. & C. L. S.) 
Contents. Humble Petition of the Monied People 
of this Republic, from the Charlestown Gazette, 
July 2^, 1779. Table of Interest. Tide-table. 
Negro Caesar's Cure for Poison. 

1782. The South-Carolina and Georgia Almanack for . . . 

1782 ... by John Tobler. . . . Charlestown: 
Printed by R. Wells and Son. 16 1. 

(C. L. Soc.) 
Contents. Charleston directory. 

1783. The Carolina and Georgia Almanack, or Ephemeries 

for . . . 1783. . . . Charlestown: Printed by R. 
Keith and J. MTver. 12 1. 

(Charleston Library Society) 
Contents. List of civil officers. Depreciation of 
Continental currency in S. C. Tide table. 

1784 The South-Carolina and Georgia Almanack, for . . . 
1 784 ... by John Tobler. . . . Charlestown : 
Printed by J. Miller. ... 12 1. 

(Charleston Library Society.) 
Contents. List of civil officers. Charleston City 
corporation. Import duties. Depreciation of cur- 
rency table. 

1784. [South CaroHna Almanack for 1784] 

8 1. imperfect, t. p. missing. 

(Charleston Library Society) 
Contents. Court sessions. Stages. Road tables. 



SOUTH CAROLINA ALMANACS 79 

1785 [The South CaroHna Almanack for 1785] 
10 1. t. p. missing. 

(Charleston Library Society) 
Contents. Courts. Charleston directory. 

1786. The North & South Carolina and Georgia Almanack 
for . . . 1786: by Isaac Bickerstaff Esq. [Benja- 
min West.] Charleston: Printed for A. 
Timothy. ill. 

(Charleston Library Soc.) 
Contents. Civil officers of S. C. Charleston City 
Corporation. 

1787 The Carolina and Georgia Almanack; or, Astronom- 
ical diary for . . . 1787. n. p.: Printed for the 
editor. 10 1. (C. L. Soc.) 

Contents. Courts. Rates of Coin in S. C. 

1787 Andrews's South Carolina and Georgia Almanack 

and ephemeris for . . . 1787 . . . Nassua, New 
Providence : Printed by John Wells. 16 1. 

(Charleston Libr'y. Society) 
Contents. Account of the first settlement in Caro- 
lina and Florida. 

1788 Southern States ephemeris: or, North and South 

Carolina and Georgia Almanack for . . . 1788. 
Charleston : Bowen, Vandle & Andrews, n. d. 36 pp 
(College of Charleston Library) 

1790 The South-Carolina and Georgia Almanack for . . . 
1790: ... by John Tobler. . . Charleston: Printed 
by Markland & MTver. 16 1. 

(So. Ca. Historical Society) 
Contents. Custom House, mode of transacting busi- 
ness; officers. State officers Charleston, officers 
of the City Corporation. Courts. 

1793. South-Carolina and Georgia Almanac for . . . 1793, 
... by William Waring. . . . Charleston : Mark- 
land & MTver, n. d. 40 pp. 

(College of Charleston Library) 
Contents. 



80 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

1797 The South-Carolina and Georgia Ahnanac for . . . 

1797 : . . . Charleston : Printed by J. M. M'lver. 
18 1. (So. Ca. Historical Society) 

Contents. Revenue department. Custom house of- 
ficers. Postmasters. State officials. Courts. Rates 
of Pilotage. Militia. Officers of the City of 
Charleston. Road tables. Societies and clubs with 
names of the officers. Office of Discount and De- 
posit. Bank of S. C. 

1798 Palladium of Knowledge: or, The Carolina and 

Georgia Almanac for . . . 1 798 . . . Charleston : 
Printed by W. P. Young. 24 1. 

(So. Ca. Hist'l. Soc. & C. L. Soc.) 
Contents : Office of Discount and Deposit in Charles- 
ton. Bank of S. C. Rates of postage. Courts. 
State officials. Militia Staff. List of members of 
the Senate and the House, elected 1796. Officers 
of the City of Charleston. Gardener's calendar by 
Mrs. Logan. Post towns from Savannah to Port- 
land, Me. Cross roads from Charleston. Method 
of planting cotton. 

1799. Palladium of Knowledge; or, The Carolina and 
Georgia Almanac for . . . 1 799 . . . Charleston : 
Printed by W. P. Young. 

(College of Charleston Library.) 

1799. The South-Carolina & Georgia Almanac, for . . . 
1799 . . . Charleston : Printed by Freneau & Paine. 
2nd. ed. 23 1. (Charleston Library Soc.) 

Contents. Tide table. Rules of the Charleston 
Chamber of Commerce. Rates of wharfage, stor- 
age, weighing, etc., according to the State laws 
passed March 1778, revived in 1783. Custom- 
house. Internal Revenue. Light house. Military 
department. Bank of S. C. Office of Deposit & 
discount. Courts and court officials. Notaries. 
City officials of Charleston. Post towns. Cross 
roads. 



SOUTH CAROLINA ALMANACS 81 

1800. Palladium of Knowledge: or, The Carolina and 
Georgia Almanac, for . . . 1800 . . . astronomical 
part by Isaac Briggs. Charleston: Printed by 
W. P. Young. 24 1. 

(Charleston Lib'ry. Soc.) 
Contents. Rates of duties on stamped vellum parch- 
ment and paper. Banks of S. C. Office of Deposit 
and Discount. Dollar table for S. C. & Georgia. 
Revenue dept. Custom house. Militia. Charles- 
ton City officials. Rules of the Charleston Cham- 
ber of Commerce. State officials. Members of 
Legislature. Courts. Gardener's calender by Mrs. 
Logan. Post office regulations. Post towns. 
Cross roads. 



ORDER BOOK 

of 

John Faucheraud Grimke. 

August 1778 to May 1780. 

(Continued from the January Number) 

April 1779 
I : Parole Countersigns. 

Officer of the Day tomorrow — Lieut. Budd 

2 : Parole Countersigns 

Officer of the Day tomorrow, Lieut. Tate. 

April 1779 Camp at Black Swamp. 

3 : G : O. Parole Counter'. 

R : O. Officer for Duty tomorrow 
r For the Day Cap' : Lieut'. Gorget. 
\ For Guard, Lieut'. Budd. 

Ordered that the Quarter Guard consist of One Lieut', 
one Serjeant one Corporal & twenty men until further 
Orders. 

The Quarter Master Serjeant will be careful tomorrow 
Morning in directing the Tents of the Quarter Guard to be 
properly pitched and at a convenient Distance from the 
front of the regiment. 

The Tents to the left of the Center of the Reg', are to 
be struck at 12 oClock & pitched closer to those on the 
Right 

4 :'" R : O. Officer for Duty tomorrow 
r For the Day — Cap'. L'. Donnom. 
! For the Guard — Lieut'. Tate 
Such of the Articles of War as have already been pointed 
out by the Commanding Officer for the Purpose are to be 
read to the regiment this forenoon at Eleven oClock. 

The Commanding Officer of the two Companies who 
went to Georo^ia are to make Returns to the Ouarter Master 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKE 83 

of Such Necessaries as their Men left behind them at Fort 
Lyttleton in order if found to have them dehvered to them. 

The Officer of the Quarter Guard is to send his Serj\ 
every two Hours to visit the Sentries in order to keep them 
alert & attentive to their Duty, the time for doing it should 
be an hour after Relief. 

G: O. Parole Countersigns 



5'" : Officers for Duty tomorrow. 

r For the Day — Cap'. Lieut'. Weaver 
\ For Guard. Lieu'. Platen. 
A Court Martial to sit immediately for the Tryal of such 
Prisoners as may be brought before them — Their Offences 
will be delivered by the Adjutant — Evidences will be par- 
ticular in their Attendance or the Prisoners will be dis- 
charged. 

President. Cap'. James Mitchell 

-./r . rCap'. L'. Weaver 

Members ^^.^^^. p^^^^^ 

G: O. 

On the Discharge of a Musket within hearing of any of 
the Posts all the Guards are to be immediately turned out, 
& Patroles Sent to discover the Cause of the Firing. The 
Guards to remain under Arms until the Patroles return. 
Every person detected firing contrary to Orders to be con- 
fined in the Main Guard. 

Parole Tamerlane Counters". Tea. Tax. 

April 1779 Camp at Black Swamp 

6'" : R : O. Officers for Duty tomorrow 
j For the Day Cap'. Roberts 
I For Guard — Lieu'. Tate 
G: O. Head Quarters 5'" April 1779 

For one Weeks Command tomorrow to relieve Col". 
Armstrong Col". Rae & Major Horry to have one days 
Provisions cooked & to be paraded at Seven oClock in the 
Morning. 

For Fatigue tomorrow 2 Subs. 3 Serj". & 50 Rank & 
File; they are to be supplied with two days Provisions & 



84 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

be ready to march at 8 oClock in the Morning; they will 
take their Orders from Colonel Laumoy.* 

Head Quarters 6'\ April 1779 
G: O. All officers who have Public Horses in their 
Possession are to make Returns of them this Evening to 
the Dep : O' : Gen'. — 

7'". R : O. Officers for Duty tomorrow, 
r For the Day Cap. Ja^ Mitchell 
\ For Guard Lieut'. Platen 

The Quarter Master will deliver a Gill of Rum to each 
Man of the Artillery & Train this forenoon. 
After Orders. 

A Court Martial to sit immediately for the Tryal of 
John Stanford of Cap'. Davis's Company. 

G: O. The Adj*. Gen', in ordering Detachments is al- 
ways to mention the Number of Days for which they are 
to draw Provisions; Notice of which being communicated 
to the Regimental Q\ M\ through the proper Channel 
makes them responsible that the Men of their respective 
regiments are supplied with provisions accordingly. 

The Com^. Officer of every Detachment, is, before he 
marches from the Parade, to enquire whether the Men are 
provided agreable to Order, and if they are not to lodge 
the names of the deficient men and the regiments to which 
they belong with the Adj'. Gen', who is positively directed 
to arrest & bring to Tryal the delinquent Quarter Masters, 
& if the Com^. Officer of the party neglects to make this 
enquiry, he becomes responsible & must answer accord- 
ingly — This is to be considered as a Standing Order, and 
all Officers are to pay strict Obedience thereto, as it hath 
been found in Some Instances that a neglect has defeated 
the end of a Detachment. 

*De Laumoy (or Lomoy) was a Major in the royal corps of 
engineers of France when selected by Benj. Franklin for service 
in America in the position of engineer. He is said to have 
arrived in America on the same ship as Lafayette, became Major, 
then Colonel during the war, was slightly wounded at Stono, 20 
June, 1779. He served in America until Oct., 1783. Afterwards 
he received in France a position of Lieut. Col. in the provincial 
troops. (Journals of Continental Congress and Tlie Freneh in Amer- 
ica.) 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKE 85 

One Cap', one Subaltern 2 Serj". & 50 Rank & File for 
fatigue to be paraded at 7 oClock tomorrow Morning with 
three days Provisions cooked : they will take their Orders 
from Col". Laumoy. 

Parole, Countersigns 

8 : Officers for Duty tomorrow 
For the Day, Cap'. Davis 
For Guard — Lieut. Tate. 
G: O. Parole Countersigns. 

A Gen'. Court Martial is to sit immediately for the Tryal 
of all Prisoners that may be brought before them: Wit- 
nesses to attend. 

President L'. Col". Scott. Members 5 Capt'. 3 Sub', from 
the South Carolina Brigades — 2 Capt'. 2 Sub', from the 
N°. Carolina Brigades & i Sub : from the Georgia Troops — 
Cap'. Theus is requested to Act as Judge Advocate. 

9'" : R : O. Officers for Duty tomorrow 

For the Day — Cap'. L'. Gorget. 

For Guard. Lieut. Tate. 
G: O. Parol Counters'. 

10'": R: O. Officer of the Day tomorrow Cap'. Lieut'. 
Donnom. 

The Quarter Master will deliver Cartridges & Flints this 
Afternoon to the different Companies in such Numbers as 
to compleat them to 12 Rounds & 2 flints ^ Man, returns 
being made by Com^ Officers of Companies this forenoon 
for that Purpose : The Men are to be warned not to destroy 
their Ammunition on pain of being punished severely. 

G: O. Parol Armstrong. Counter'. Arts. Arms. 

11"': R: O. Officer of the day tomorrow. Cap'. Lieut'. 
Weaver. 
G : O. The Troop is to beat at 8 oClock in the Morning. 
Parole Belfast; Counter'. Bee. Bull. 

12'": R: O. Officer of the Day tomorrow. Cap'. Roberts. 

G: O: The Gen'. Court Martial now sitting, L*. Col". 
Scott President Cap'. Ladson Judge Advocate, have re- 



86 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

ported, William Cadwell charged with taking up & claiming 
a public Horse — acquitted. 

Alex'. M'Donald private in the ist. So. Carolina reg'. 
charged with stealing Soap — found guilty, & sentenced to 
receive 75 Lashes on his bare back with a Cat nine Tails — 
The Gen', approves the sentence & orders it to be executed 
tomorrow Morning at Troop beating — Mich' Kennedy a 
Soldier in the 2". S°. Carolina Reg*, charged with Desertion 
from the 5*" N°. Carolina Regiment found guilty & sen- 
tenced to receive 100 Lashes on his bare back with a Cat 
nine Tails — to serve his time of Lilistment in the 2^ Reg\ 
& the time of Lilistment in the Service of N°. Carolina — 
The Gen', approves the Sentence & orders it to be carried 
into Execution tomorrow Morning. 

Cap'. Felix Warley of the 3". South Carolina Reg', is 
appointed Auditor in the Southern Departments of the 
Quarter Master, Pay Master, Director, Cloathier or Barrack 
Master Gen', and of the Commissaries Gen', of Provisions, 
Prisoners & Military Stores. 

For one Weeks Command L'. Col". M'^Intosh and Major 

the Men for this Command to be paraded & ready to 

march tomorrow Morning at 7 oClock, with one days pro- 
vision cooked. 

Parole, Cabinet. Counters'. Calm. Camp. 

13". R : O. Officer of the day tomorrow Cap'. Ja'. Mitchell. 

The Quarter Master will issue out Knapsacks to Cap'. E. 
Mitchell's Company agreeable to a Return signed by the 
Commanding Officer of the Same 
G : O : Parole, Emperor. Counters'. Edward. Ely. 

The Gen'. Court Martial of which Lieut. Col". Scott is 
president have further reported Oyburn Crab of the 5'" N°. 
Carolina Battalion charged with Neglect of Duty in letting 
a prisoner escape, found guilty & sentenced to receive 50 
Lashes on the bare back with a Cat o Nine Tails — The 
Gen', approves the Sentence but remits the Stripes. 

Joseph Case of the 5'" N". Carolina Regiment charged 
with Neglect of Duty in letting a prisoner escape found 
guilty & sentenced to receive 50 lashes on the bare back with 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKE 87 

a Cat O Nine Tails — The Gen', approves the Sentence but 
remits the Stripes. 

14 R: O. Officer of the day tomorrow Cap'. Davis. 
G: O. Parole Counters'. 

15. R: O: Officer of the day tomorrow. Cap'. Lieu'. 
Gorget. 

Offxers commanding Companies are daily to examine the 
Ammunition of their Men to see that none be wasted or 
destroyed and when they find any guilty of such misconduct, 
they are to confine them in order for Punishment. 

G: O. Parole Counters'. 



16 : R : O : Officer of the day tomorrow Cap'. L'. Donnom. 
G: O. Parole, Guard. Counters'. Gates, Green. 

The Gen'. Order of the 2". April directing the Gentries to 
oblige all Horsemen to dismount is to be understood to 
relate only to the Out Posts. 

17: R. O. Officer of the Day tomorrow Cap'. Lieu'. 

Weaver. 
G : O. Parole Countersigns 

The Soldier who found a Gold Ring & brought it to 
Head-Quarters a few Weeks ago, is directed to deliver it to 
the Adj'. Gen', by whom he will be rewarded; the Owner 
being known. 



18: R: O. Officer of the Day tomorrow. Cap'. Roberts. 
G: O. Parole. Countersigns. 

19: R: O. Officer of the Day tomorrow — Cap'. Jas. 

Mitchell 
G : O. Parole Countersigns, 

The Militia under the Command of Col". Simmons are to 
discharge their Arms this afternoon as 5 oClock. 

Head Quarters Black Swamp 19'" April 1779. 
G. O. for command tomorrow Lieu'. Coll Mason and 
Major Lide of Col'. Sumners Brigade i Captain 2 Subal- 
terns I Serjt. and 35 Rank and file from the 2" i Cap'", i 
Subaltern 2 Serjeants and 32 Rank & file from the 5'" 



88 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

South Carolina Regiments 2 Captains 5 Subalterns 9 Ser- 
jeants and 235 rank and file from Col'. Simmons Brigade 
they are to be paraded at 11 Oclock Tomorrow Morning 
with I Days Provisions Cooked. 

20: Camp Black Swamp 20th April 1779. 

R. O. Officer of the Day Tomorrow Capt. Davis. 

The Men are this evening at Rool [sic] Calling to be 
supplied with a sufficient number of Cartridges to compleate 
to 12 Round p'. man and 2 flints, the Quarter Master will 
attend for the purpose — Officers Commanding Companies 
Will see this Order executed as they must answer for the 
neglect. 



21 : R: O : Officer of the Day tomorrow Cap*. L'. Gorget. 

Guard Lieut. Jackson 

Head Quarters. 21''. April 1779. 
G : O. A Court of inquiry is to sit immediately to examine 
into the conduct of Lieut Co". Mason Relative to two 
Charges exhibited against him by Cap*. Felix Warley. 

President Gen". Huger. 

Major Wise, Major Armstrong. Two Captains 2 Suba'. 
from Gen'. Huger's Brigade, i Captain i Subaltern from 
Gen'. Sumners Brigade. Cap*. Warley is to Support the 
Charges all Witnesses to attend. The Main Guard to be re- 
inforced with I Captain & 6 privates 

22 : 22 April 1779. 
Reg" : Orders — Officers for duty Tomorrow — For the 

Day Cap'. L'. Weaver, for Guard Lieut. Budd. 

Every Officer Commanding a Gun is immediately to ex- 
amine the lockers to know whither he has at least 15 Rounds 
of Cartridges and Ball with a Sufficient Number of Tubes 
and see the Lint Staves properly Charged with Mach. 
Should any thing be wanted the Quarter Master will be 
cearful [sic] to Deliver it on application. 

2T,: Black Swamp 23". April 1779. 

R : O. Officers for duty tomorrow 
For the Day Cap'. E. Mitchell 
For the Guard, Lieu'. Tate. 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKE 89 

G: O. Captain Benj°. Cattle now acting in the Army Is 
to be considered as a Confidential Officer attindent on Gen'. 
Moultrie and all order from the Gen'. Conveyed By him 
are to be obeyed and he respected accordingly 

Regimental Surgeons are Directed to send Before 12 
Oclock in the Morning to the flying Hosp'. such of their 
sick as cannot be properly taken care of in Camp. 
General After Orders. 

Orders having been repeatedly issued forbidding the 
disorderly custom of firing in Camp, the General for the 
information of those who have latel}^ arrived & may pos- 
sibly be unacquainted with them, this once repeats the 
Injunction : He is hopeful that it will be attended to, and 
that He shall not be put to the disagreeable necessity of 
enforcing it by more vigorous measures. 

24: 24th April 1779 

Order of March. 
The Army will march by the Right at two oclock this 
afternoon 

The Advanced Guard to be composed of the Light 
Infantry. 

I Piece of Artillery * 

South Carolina Brigade. 
Baggage of D°. 
Park &c 
Main Guard : i Capt i Sub : 3 Serjts & 34 R : & F. 
North Carolina Brigade 
I Piece of Artillery 
Baggage of the N^ Carolina Brigade 
Rear Guard Composed of the Old Guards. 
R: O. Officers having Men in the Flying Hospital are to 
visit them this Day & get such as are fit for Duty Dis- 
charged. 

The Troops are to March tomorrow Morning at 4 o- 
Clock by the right of the N : C. Brigade 

25 : Kings Creek 3 Miles from Mathews's Bluff. 

25 April 1779. 
Parole — Ouixote — Count". Ouart. Ouince. 



90 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Field Officer for the Day tomorrow — L'. Col". Hender- 
son. 

B: M. Lieut. Hamilton 

The Discharge of a Musquet from the Park of Artillery, 
will be the Signal for the Guards to come in & the Wag- 
gons loaded. 

The General desires that an exact return of the Officers 
No-Com". Officers & Soldiers including the Hospital Escort 
be made tomorrow Morning when the Troops halt. 

26 : Swicord's Mill four Miles below Summerlines. 

April 26, 1779 
Parole — Rochester. C. S. Rich. Right. 
F : O. for the Day tomorrow L'. Col". Scott. 
B : M. Cap*. Raiford. 

2f Four Mile Branch (near Stephen Smith's) 
Parol — Saratoga. C : S : Salley — Smith. 
F : O. for the day to-morrow — Major Wise. 
B : M. Lieut. Hamilton. 

{To be continued.) 



SOUTH CAROLINA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Communicated by Mr. Lothrop Withington, 30 Little Russell 

Street, W. C, London (including "Gleanings" by Mr. H. F. 

Waters, not before printed). 

JOHN COLLETON of Wliitecomb Rawlegh, in the County of 
Devon, Baronet. Will 22 April 1 75 1 ; proved 30 November 
1754. To be privately buried in the vault I built adjoining 
to Whitecomb Chappel. My coffin to be the same as my 
grandson Fetters, a double coffin covered with Black bays, 
black nails and Hinges to be carried in plain black Hearse, 
twelve men that worked to or sold to the House to carry 
from Hearse to grave with 5s. each for Crape and Halbert 
and gloves, all due for funerall except Coffin and gloves not 
to exceed £30, no strong Drink to be given but one glass 
of wine to each who attend my funeral. To my servants 
£5 each instead of mourning and tO' the minister of the 
parish five guineas. To the poor of Witycomb all the 
money to be found in the poor's drawer in my bureau. To 
my son Robert Land etc at Exmouth now in possession of 
William Drake Gould Esqre and the estate at Whestone in 
Finchley, County Middlesex late Thomas Amys deceased 
and mortgaged to me a bond with interest due from Robert 
Leslie Esqr and £10 for mourning also the silver Tea 
Table. To my unhappy daughter Elizabeth late wife to 
Edward Hawley Esqre her Bond to me for £100 and five 
guineas. To Ann Collins daughter of the late Reverend 
John Collins of Stoke county Devon Clerk deceased for her 
kindness to my late wife and assisting us in all our sick- 
nesses since she lived with us £40 per annum for life and 
the use of my house v^'here I lived at Exmouth and all 
household goods, horses, carriages and use of furniture 
Liquor coals or hay etc clear of all rent Taxes or repairs 
Nota Bene all the Furniture of the chamber where she lies 
except two Landskaps and the Family Pictures are her 
own proper goods brought there as also the Furniture in 
her two Closets and her Plate and Silver Coffee Pot a 
Scollopped Waiter and Hand Candlestick also I bequeath 
to her too the 12 silver spoons marked only C. and exon- 
erate all debts I will and require that my Books, pictures 



92 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

or Clocks shall never be sold but go to my heir and executor 
but Ann Collins if living to have use of stair head Cloth 
and also £io for mourning. To my daughter in law Susan- 
nah Colleton now in Carolina £io and steward who re- 
ceives rents in Devon and Exon £io. To Grandson John 
Colleton son to late John Colleton deceased in Carolina 
and Susannah his wife, his heirs etc all estate in Great 
Britain not otherwise disposed . of but if he die without 
heirs male then to my son Robert Colleton. Also to said 
Grandson John Colleton all Grants, Dominions, Royalties 
and Jurisdictions in South America but whereas previous 
to marriage of son John Colleton deceased with Susannah 
Snell I gave him my Barony called Fairlawns in South 
Carolina and said son John has settled same on wife and 
children and charged son by his late wills and as I cannot 
recollect any legal assignment I confirm said gift etc, etc to 
Executors in trust till grandson John Colleton is 21; my 
true and dear friend Ann Collins and my dearest son Rob- 
ert Colleton, with power to grant leases till grandson John 
Colleton is 21 etc. Written with my own hand. Witnesses: 
Finney Belfield, Allen Belfield, Wndym Walker. Proved 
in Prerogative Court of Canterbury by son Robert Colleton 
Esquire reserving to Ann Collins spinster the other ex- 
ecutor. Proved by said Ann Collins spinster surviving 
executor 7 March 1755. Proved by Sir John Colleton, 
Baronet grandson of the deceased, now of age 22 August 
1757 proof to Ann Collins spinster, surviving executrix 
said grant having expired. 

Pen fold, 295. 

DANIEL HUGER of Berkley, County province of South Caro- 
lina Will 16 November 1754; proved 7 January 1756. To 
Church of Shore Ditch Parish in Oxon (sic. i. e. Hoxton) 
near London in Great Britain £50 in my South Sea annui- 
ties to be annexed to the Legacy founded by Mr. Thomas 
Fairchild and to be appropriated to the same use to preach 
yearly a Sermon on the Wonderful Works of God in the 
Vegetable Creation To my wife Ann Huger a tenement 
in Colleton Square which I purchased of Mr. John Cordes 
and £4000 to be taken out of my South Sea Annuities and 



SOUTH CAROLINA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND 93 

£3000 South Carolina money, negro girl named Cena and 
her issue, bed etc. in lieu of dower. To Benjamin Perdriau 
Junior, Elizabeth Perdriau and Lydia Perdriau Son and 
daughters of Benjamin Perdriau my Cousin £200. To my 
son Daniel Huger my plantations called Limrick and Rice 
Hope including the lands bought of Messrs Gough and 
Roche. To son Isaac Huger three tracts purchased of Mr. 
Thomas Lynch in Berkley County on the Head of Wando 
River (1384 acres) also two tracts bought of Mr. John 
Mayrant (730 acres). To my son John Huger my Cyprus 
Plantation with 500 acres bought of Mr. James Boisseau 
(making in all 3425 acres) near Savanna Bridge in Craven 
County. To son Benjamin Huger 1500 acres of land 
bought of Mr. James Nicholas Mayrant deceased, joining 
on my Cyprus Tract, Mr. Elias Ball's Tract, with also 500 
acres purchased from the Lords Proprietors joining on Mr. 
John Nicholson's Lands and on lands bought of Mr. Roche, 
said 2000 acres to son Benjamin. To son John a Planta- 
tion bought of Mr. William Moore called the Hagan on the 
T. of the Eastern Branch of Cooper River and two tracts I 
bought of Mr. Hall and Messrs Bonneaus joining the said 
Hagan plantation. To son Benjamin my corner House in 
Charles Town fronting the broad Street with my other four 
Houses joining it and fronting Church Street. To son 
Daniell Corner House in Charles Town, fronting on Elliott 
Street and to Son Isaac tenement adjoining in Elliott 
Street. To son Francis £2000 sterling in South Sea annu- 
ities and £1000 South Carolina money to be paid to Colonel 
Francis Lejeau and his son Francis Lejeau for use of son 
Francis etc. To son Paul, ditto, ditto. To daughter Mar- 
garet £1000 sterling and £1000 South Carolina money to 
be paid ditto at 21 or marriage and if Francis or Paul die 
before 21 or the girl before 21 or marriage then to servivors 
etc. Executors for said three children : said Colonel Fran- 
cis Lejeau and his son Francis Lejeau who are empowered 
to lend said £5000 sterling given to Francis Paul and Mar- 
garet and to place at interest in South Carolina etc. Rest 
of personal estate either in South Sea Annuities or other 
matters in Great Britain in the Provinces etc to sons Daniel, 
Isaac John and Benjam.in as they attain 21 etc. To son 



94 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Isaac I GO acres lately bought of Mr. Richard Capers Join- 
ing the East Lands bought of Mr. Thomas Lynch All 
slaves on Plantations to be worked till son Daniel is 19 and 
all produce of all worldly estate to be appoynted to mainte- 
nance of four sons Daniel, Isaac John and Benjamin till 
their ages of 19, to have good and liberal education as can 
be had in the Provinces and Plantation charges being satis- 
fied, surplus of money from sale of moveables etc. (except 
gold and silver plate to be divided to four sons) to be 
appropriated to purchase of young slaves to work with 
others and all slaves to said four sons at 19 etc. Executors 
to meet twice yearly in first Tuesday in March and Septem- 
ber to settle accounts etc. Executors : Messrs Gabriel 
Manigault, Elias Horry, Daniel Lesesne and Thomas Cor- 
des till son Daniel is 19, then son Daniel sole executor of 
estate relating to his three brothers Isaac, John and Ben- 
jamin, receiving more particularly said Elias Horry and 
Daniel Lesesne care of Wando Plantation and Gabriell 
Manigault and Thomas Cordes of Limerick Plantations. 
Witnesses : E. Ball, John Coming Ball, Pr Sallens. Proved 
in Prerogative Court of Canterbury by Thomas Corbett 
Esquire, Attorney for Francis Lejeau senior and Francis 
Lejeau junior so far as power to sell £5000 South Sea 
Stock for benefit of Children Francis Huger, Paul Huger, 
and Margaret Huger Administration of all goods etc. of 
said Daniel Huger late of Berkley county in the Province 
of South Carolina deceased granted 3 April 1764 (except 
as concerns £5000 ditto) to Charles Garth, attorney for 
Daniel Huger, son of deceased, as executor named in the 
will, now residing in said Province of South Carolina. 

Glazier, 11. 

In the name of God Amen. I roger pinckney of Peter- 
borough in the county of Northton Gent do make this my 
last will and Testament in manner following. I desire to 
be buried in the Churchyard of the parish or place where I 
shall dye at the least Expense which may be and without 
any Persons to support the Pall and that six Poor Persons 
may carry me to the Grave to whom I desire my Executrix 
hereafter named to give half a Crown each instead of gloves 



SOUTH CAROLINA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND 95 

and Hatbands And whereas my two Sons are in all prob- 
ability well provided for I am willing therefor to make the 
best provision for my Daughters that I can as hereafter 
Imprimis I give to my Wife Anna Maria Pinckney All my 
mone}' and Securities for money debts Stock in Trade and 
all other my Effects whatsoever for and during her natural 
life and after her decease to my three daughters Jane, Ann 
and Mary in the proportions following. To my Daughter 
Jane One hundred pounds less than is to the other two in 
regard she has two hundred pounds now in her possession 
the rest to be equally devided amongst them And I make 
my said wife Executrix of this my Will hereby revoking 
and making void all former and other wills by me at any 
time heretofore made And desire that all my just debts 
be fully and legally discharged In Witness whereof I have 
hereunto set my hand and Seal this twenty fifth day of 
July in the year of Our Lord 1772. Rogr Pinckney (L. S.) 
Signed Sealed Published and declared by the within Tes- 
tator as and for his last will in the presence of the Testator 
and of each other W. Brown Danl Douglas. This will 
was proved at London the thirty first day of October in 
the year of Our Lord one thousand seven hundred and 
seventy four before the Right Worshipful Sir George Hay 
Knight Doctor of Laws Master Keeper or Commissary of 
the Prerogative Court of Canterbury lawfully constituted by 
the Oath of Anna Maria Pinckney Widow and Relict of 
the Deceased and Sole Executrix named in the said Will to 
whom administration was granted all and singular the 
goods chattells and Credits of the said deceased having been 
first svvorn by Commission duly to administer. 

375, Bargrave. 

WILLIAM HAGGATT of Mill Hill couuty Middlesex, Esq. 
Will 18 May 1773; proved 13 July 1773. To my wife 
Elizabeth Haggatt my two plantations called Lamberts and 
I-Iaggatts Hall in Barbadoes and my two estates called 
Crowfield in St. James Parish Goose Creek and Haggatt 
Hall in St. George Dorchester and Province of South 
Carolina, North America and all estate in England. To 



96 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

James Marshall Esq now living with me at Mill Hill £500 
and to Miss Mary Dunne now at Mill Hill £50. Execu- 
tors: wife and James Marshal Esq. Witnesses: J. Rams- 
den, John Bullivane and James Hunt. 

Stevens, 294. 

{Continued from Vol. XI.) 



REGISTER OF 

ST. ANDREW'S PARISH. BERKELEY COUNTY, 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 



1719-1774. 



Copied and Edited by Mabel L. Webber. 

(Continued from the January Ntits ber) 
BUraALS P' REV**, m'. MARTYN 

William Brandford Buried May y' 3". 1767. 

Son of Richard King & Jane his wife Buried Sept'. 

1767 intr^ without a minister 

John Gibson Buried (intre" without a minister) Oct". 20*" 

1767. Died at Maj'. Thomas Fullers. 
Owen Bowen Buried. Died at S' BarthoP'. intr**. without 

a Minister Nov"'. y° 22" 1767. 
William Fairchild Son of Alexander Walker Buried Nov"'. 

y^ 17*" 1767. int"* without a minister 
John Boneau Jun'. Son of John Bonneau & his wife 

Buried Dec"'. 27th 1767. intr''. without a Minister. 
Rebecah the wife of Coll". Robert Rivers Buried January 

y^ 3'- 1768. 

Elizabeth-Anne the wife of Francis Rose Buried p' the Rev*. 

M'. Cooper of S*. Mich''\- Chas Town April 24*' 1768 
Charles Jones Buried July y' 4*" 1768 inter": without a 

Minister 
Joseph Williams Buried p' the Rev*. M'. Cooper of S*. 

Michals Charles Town Sept"' 2'. 1768 
Marg'. Daught'. of John Martin Rem & Barbare his wife 

Oversear to Whitm^': Fuller Buried Oct'. 15'" 1768. int". 

without a minister 
Frances a Dutch Serv*. of M'. John Lloyd. Buried 

inter^ without a Minister 16"' Nov"'. 1768. 
Barbery y' wife of John Martin Rem Buried Nov"'. 22^ 

1768 intr^ without a minister. 

Martha the Daught'. of Thomas Scott & Anne his wife 
Buried Nov"', y^ 30'" 1768. 



98 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

John Martin Rem Buried Feb'^ 9*" 1769 intr^ without a 

Minister 
A young Infant Son of Wilham Henry Drayton Esq'. & 

Dorothy his wife Buried Oct'. 5, 1769 
John Rivers Buried Decemb'. y' 3". 1768. 
John Son of Richard King & Jane his wife Buried May y' 

19*" 1769 
Sarah Daught'. of Elizabeth Rivers widow of John Rivers 

Deceased Buried June y' 7'" 1769. intr" without a Min- 
ister 
Hugh Willson Buried August y' iS"" 1769 intr^ without a 

minister, he was an oversear to M\ Thomas Fuller. 
Sarah Daught'. of Doct'. Thomas Honnour Buried Oct'. 

29" 1769 inter'', vvithout a Minister 
Elizabeth the Wife of Thomas Fuller Buried p' y' Rev^ M'. 

Martyn Nov"', y" 23^ 1769. 
Vvhitmarsh Fuller Buried Decemb'. y' 6" 1769. 
David Jones Buried Janu"" y' 18'" 1770 int'". without a 

Minister. 
Thomas Jones Buried Feb''', y' 2''. 1770 int'*. without a 

minister 
Elizabeth the wife of Mathurin Guerin Sen'. Buried p'. 

M'. Evins the Anab"''. Teacher Feb'^ y' 6*" 1770. 
Frances Ladson Son of Joseph Dadson Buried Feb''', y' 27'" 

1770 
Martha the wife of John Man Sn'. Buried p' y' Rev^ 

M'. Martyn March y' 5" 1770 
Benjamin Son of Mary Hyrne (widow to Henry Hyrne 

Esq'. Deces".) Buried p' the Rev^ M". Marty". April y' 

14*" 1770 
Thomas Elliott Buried p'. the Rev^ ]M'. Panting May v' 

r 1770. 

John Taylor of James Island Buried p' the Rev^ M' Pant- 
ing July y' 15" 1770 

Margaret Daught'. to John Godfrey & Patitence his wife 
Buried Sept', y' 18" 1770. intr'. without a Minister. 



REGISTER OF ST. AND'iEWS PARISH 99 

CHRISTININGS 

Martha-Elliott Daught"' of Alexander Walker and Anne his 

Wife Bapt'" p'. the Rev''. M'. Panting in Chas Town Feb- 

eruary y' 12'" 1770. 
Jane Daught'. of Thomas Scott & Anne his wife Bapt'^ p'. 

Rev". Robert Cooper Rect'. S'. Michals Chas Tov/ne 

May — 1768 
Elizabeth Govan an Adult Bapt"'. p' the Rev". M'. Panting 

March y" 3". 1771 came from the Back Settlements. 
John Son of Philip Power & Mary his wife. Baptiz": p"" 

the Rev". M^ Panting March y' 3". 1771. of S*. Bartholo- 
mew. 
Beulah Daugh'. of John-Vine' : Man and Anne his wife 

Bapt"\ Priv'. Bapt"". April 28''. 1771 
Jonathan Son of John Miles & Anne his wife Baptiz". May 

y' 14'" 1 77 1 by the Rev". Thomas Panting. 
Mary Anne Daught'. of Robert Rose and Rebecca his wife 

Bapt^". ?:ov"'. y" 25"^ 1771. by y" Rev". M'. Schwab 
Edith Elliott Daugh''. of Joseph Elliott & Sarah his wife 

Deces". Bapt^'". p'. y^ Rev". M'. Schwab. Jan'^ y^ 12*' 1772. 

Sarah Daught'. Ibid 1 T5 .zd r ,, -p d ^;rr c 1 u 
^.,1 , c r Tu-j ^Bapt p the Rev . M . Schwab. 
Gilbert Son of Ibid J ^ ^ 

William Son of William Robinson & Jane his wife Bapt'". 

March y' i"\ 1772 p'. the Rev". M'. Schwab. 
Mary Ann Daught'. of Mathew Smallwood & Judith his 

wife Bapt'". p' y' Rev". M'. Schwab April y' 12"" 1772 
Elizabeth Daught'. of John Lining & Mary his wife Bapt'". 

p'. Rev". M'. Schwab May y' 27"' 1772. 

BURIALS P' y' rev", m'. PANTING 

Margaret the wife of John Cattell Buried Octo"' y' 17*" 

1770 p' the Rev". Thomas Panting 
The wife of John Swetman Buried Octo"". y' 31". 

1770 intr". without a minister. 
Frances Daugh' of Adam McDonald & Buried Feb"' 

1771 

Martha-Elliott the Daught'. of Alex"'. Walker & Anne his 
wife Buried Feb''': 23". 1771 int'". without Minister. 



100 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Mary the Daught^ of Samtiell Stent & Mary his wife Buried 

March y' 5*\ 1771 intr". without a Minister 
Elizabeth the wife of Edward Legge, Buried: April: 23": 

1771 

The Rev^ M^ Thomas Panting* A. M. rector of this Parish 
1771- Virtus Post Funera Vivit. 

Joseph Fitch Oversear to M^ Nathaniel Fuller Buried Aug- 
ust 9'" 1 771 int**. without a minister. 

Elizabeth the wife of Joseph Hughes Buried at Edw^ Fen- 
wick's, Esqrs plantation August y' 19"" 1771 intr". with- 
out a minister 

Edward Smith y' Schoolmaster Buried Sept"', y" 4" 1771 
intr"*. without a Minister. 

Elizabeth Daught\ of Thomas Holman & Mary his wife 
Buried Sept*", y" 5*" 1771 intr**. without a Minister. 

Christopher Son of Edward Legge Buried Octo''^ y' 7'" 
1 77 1 intr'^. without a Minister. 

James Patterson Buried Octo"' 7*' 1771 liv". at M". Rut- 
ledge, intr'^. without a Minister. 

John Sam ways Buried Octob\ 29'" 1771. intr*". without a 
Minister. 

John Sweetman Buried Nov*" I77i- intr^ without a 

Minist'. 

William Edwards Buried Dec"'. 14*" 1771 int'*' without a 
Minist'. 

BIRTHS 

William Son of Mathew Smallwood & Judith his wife Born 
Nov*" 13*" 1768. Bapt'''. p'. y' Rev'. M'. Cooper in Chas 
Town. 

John Son of Philip Power & Mary his wife Born — 1771- 

Beulah Daugh". of John Vin" Man & Anne his wife born 
Feb'^ 27" 1771. 

Jonathan Son of John Miles & Anne his wife born Sept"'. 

15" 1770 
Charles-Cattell Son of Alexander Walker & Anne his wife 
born Sept'. 17'" 1771. Bapti''. p'. the Rev'. M'. Cooper 
in Cha\ Town. 

*Soufh Carolina and American General Gazette, September 24, 
1771. Deaths] Rev. Thomas Panting, A. M. Rector of St. An- 
drews Parish. 



REGISTER OF ST. ANDREWS PARISH 101 

Maryanne Daugh". of Robert Rose & Rebecca his wife born 

August 15'" 

Mary Anne Daught'. of Mathew Small wood & Judith his 

wife Born January y° 4'" 1772. 
Sarah Daught'. of Richard Park Stobo & Sarah his wife 

Born 



Charlotte Daught'. of Ibid Born April 26: 1772. were twins 
Elizabeth Daugh". of John Lining and Mary his wife Bom 

22^. May 1772. 
Mary Daught'. of Frances Rose & Sarah his wife born 

August 15". N. B. the second of that name. 

John son of William Robinson & Jane his wife born Jan- 
uary 17*" 1767 
Frances Son Ibid Born October y' i" 1769 
William Son to Ibid Born Feberuary 19*" 1772 
William Son of William Godfrey & Sarah Fowler born — 
— 1773- 

MARRIAGES 

Doc'. Edward Gunter and Martha Melachamp married April 

12'" 1772. 
Col. Thomas Fuller to Catherine Foley by the Rev". W. 

Purcell of Christ Church 1773 

M'. George Mullins to Sarah Cattell on the Seventeenth day 

of June 1773 
M'. Alexander McQueen to Elizabeth Fuller- Spinster the 

fourteenth of January 1774 by the Rev". M^ Pearce of 

Dorchester. 
M'. Mathurin Guerin Sen', to Peacock" on the 

1774 by the Rev". M'. 

M^ William Sanders to Mary Ouarterman Widow on Tues- 
day i". February 1774. by the Rev". M'. Dundass.* 
M'. Archibald Scott to Mary Rivers Spinster on Thursday 

the 3". February, 1774 by the Rev". M'. Dundass. 
M^ David Scott to Elizabeth Man Spinster on Thursday 

the 10" February 1774. by the Rev". M'. Purcell. 
M^ John-Alleyne Walker to Jane Oliphant Spinster on 

Thursday the 24'" February 1774. by Rev". M'. Cooper. 

*Rev. John Dundas of St. John's Parish, Colleton. 



102 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Doctor Charles Drayton to Esther Middleton Spinster on 
Thursday the 24" February 1774. by Rev". M^ Cooper. 

M^ Thomas Rose to Miss Mary Blake Spinster on Thurs- 
day the 13th Oct^ 1774. 

M^ Frick to Miss Hinckle Spinster on Thursday 

the 13" Oct'. 1774. 

BURIALS 

Richard Son of John Godfrey Buried Janu'"''. 2^ 1772. int''^ 
without a Minister. (The Remark buried zvithout a Min- 
ister is Superficial, as the Minister was no Resident in the 
Parish, neither was him any notice given at the Place of 
his Residence. — Schwab. ) 

Mrs. Martha Adams a poor v\^oman Buried Janu'^ 4*" 1772 
int*^. without a Minister. (The same is answered by the 
foregoing note. — Schwab. ) 

Frances Mucklewain wid°. died in Cha\ Town Buried a S*. 
Andrews Church Feb'''. 8"' 1772. intr**. without a IMinister. 
(The same is answered as before mentioned. Schwab.) 

Elisha Fowler Buried at M'. John Cattells Feb'"^ 19**^ 1772. 
int'". without a Minister. (The same answer as above. 
Schwab. ) 

Mary-Henrieta the wife of the Hon"'' : Henry Middleton 
Esq^ Buried March y' 2^ 1772. int'"^ without a Minister. 
(When this Lady was buried, I was in the Parish but not 
desired to attend the Funeral. Schwab. ) 

M". Smith wid""^. Buried from William Scotts Esq\ 

April y* 5" 1772. p . y' Rev". M^ Schwab. 

Richard Rose son of Frances Rose Buried May y' 17" : 1772 
p^ y° Rev". M^ Schwab. 

Sarah Daught'. of Richard Park Stobo & Mary his wife 
Buried June y' i'*. 1772. 

Charlota Daught'. of Ibid Buried July y! 3". 1772, int'". 
Without a Minister. (The 3". of July I was in the Par- 
ish, but perhaps unknown to M". Stobo & ]\r. Man. — 
Schwab. ) 

Benjamin- William (son of Thomas Bull & Sarah his wife) 
Buried p'. the Rev". M'. Schwab July y' 30*". 1772. 

the wife of Cap'. Easts Buried p'. the Rev". M'. 

Earnest Schwab. Sept\ y' 26*". 1772 



REGISTER OF ST. ANDREWS PARISH 103 

John Man, Clerk of this Parish, buried The 30 8'": 1772 by 
C. E. Schwab. 

Sarah Bull wife of Thomas Bull buried by the Rev'. M\ 
Schwab 30'" May. 1773. 

Elizabeth daughter of John Lining & Mary his wife Buried 
by July the 7" [ ?] 1773. 

1773. The Rev". M'. Schwab Minister of this Parish De- 
parted this life after a very few Days Sickness on Monday 
the Fifth Day of July, about 6 o'clock in the Evening, 
and was Buried on Tuesday being the Sixth Day of July, 
near the side of the Church, in the Yard Opposite to the 
Communion Table The rever'd M'. Pearce of Dorchester 
read the Ceremony. 

William Miles was Buried at his house where he was living 
on Monday the Twenty Eighth Day of June in the Year 
of our Lord 1773 by the Rev". M'. Schwab. 

Lydia M. Fuller daughter of Nathaniel Fuller & Ann his 
wife died on the 19"' October & buried the 20*** 1773 by 
the Rev". M^ Pierce of Dorchester. 

Arthur Deloney died on the 26*" October & buried the 27'" 
October 1773 

John Drayton Jun'. died on the 27*" October & buried the 
28" October 1773. 

Thomas Mellichamp Senr. died on the 4*" November & 
buried the 6"" November 1773. 

Thomas Llolman died on the 14*" January & buried on the 
17" January, 1774. 

Alex^ Peroneau died on the 30" November 1773. [sic] 

Mary the wife of Thomas Rose died on Tuesday, i Feb- 
ruary 1774, & buried the 3". February 1774 by the Rev". 
M^ Dundass. 

James Coffin died on Tuesday the 22". February & buried 
the 24*" February, 1774. 

John Cattell (son of William) died on Tuesday the 15 
March & buried on Thursday the 17*" of March 1774 by 
the Rev". M'. Dundass. 

James Thomas died on Tuesday the 15 March & buried on 
Wednesday the 16*" Day of March 1774 

George Mullins died on Friday the 29 April 1774 & buried 
on Sunday the i'* May 1774 



104 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 
CHRISTININGS P'. REv" MR SCHWAB. 

Mary Daught'. of Frances Rose & Sarah his wife Bap"*. 

Sept'. y\ 2*^ 17 — [worn off.] 
Elizabeth daughter of Benjamin Rivers & Mary his wife 

baptized the 13*" June 1773. 
Susannah Wilson daughter of James Coffin & Sidney his 

wife the 16'" January 1774. baptized by the Rev"*. M'. 

Pierce. 
John Son of Daniel Boyden & his wife baptized on 

Sunday the 3". April 1774. by the Rev". M'. Dundass 
Lydia Daughter of Benjamin Cattell & Mary his wife bap- 
tized on Tuesday the 5" April 1774, by the Rev**. M'. 

Dundass. 
Francis son of Robert Sr Rebecca Rose baptized on Sunday 

2T, Oct'. 1774. Rev^ M'. Lewis 
Rachael daughter of Abram Ladson & Elizabeth his wife 

baptized on Sunday 23'*. Oct'. 1774. Rev". M'. Lewis of 

S\ Pauls. 
Hannah Christiana Daughter of John Alleyne Walter & 

Jane his wife baptized Thursday 31 November 1774 by 

the Reverend M'. Cooper of S*. Michaels 

BIRTHS 

Lydia Daughter of Benjamin Cattell «& Mary his wife born 

the S'". day of October 1773. 
[worn off]. Son of Daniel Boyden and his wife 

born the 2''. day of March 1774. 
Rachael Daughter of Abram Ladson & Elizabeth his wife 

born the 8'" day of April 1774 
Sarah, daughter of John Lining & Mary his wife born the 

13" January 1774. 
Hannah Christiana daughter of John Alleyne Walter & Jane 

his wife born the 21 November 1774. 
Henry son of Charles Drayton & Esther his wife born 24'" 

November 1774. 

daughter of Glen Drayton Esq"" & his wife Elizabeth 

born 26 June 1783 in the Morn*". 

Daughter of Thomas Drayton Sen'. & his wife Mary 



born 1783. 



REGISTER OF ST. ANDREWS PARISH 105 

BURIALS 

Cap*. Isaac Ladson died on & was buried on 

Nathaniel Fuller died on and was buried on 
Benjamin Fuller died on and was buried on 
Konble. John Drayton died on and was buried on 



Richard Park Stobo died on February and was buried 

on— 1785^ 
Mary wife of Richard Park Stobo died and was buried 

on 

Colonell William Cattell died on and was buried* 

Benjamin Cattell died on and was buriedy 

Captain Thomas Tucker died and was buried 

John Drayton (son of John) died and was buried 



Nancy Daughter of Thomas Farr died and was buried 



BURIALS! 

Died at Summerville, S. C. April 2^ 1891, the Rev''. John 
Grimke Drayton of "Magnolia on the Ashley," for many 
years rector of St. Andrews Church, St. Andrews Parish, 
S. C. and also rector of the Church of St. John in the 
Wilderness, at Flat Rock, North Carolina. His remains 
were interred in the Churchyard at Flat Rock. 

Died in Charleston, S. C. Susan Pauline daughter of Paul 
F. and Agnes Haig Matthewes interred in St Andrew's 
Churchyard March 2, 1897. 

Died in Charleston S. C. April 13, 1898 Donald D. Sams 
M. D. in the 78" year of his age. Interred in St. An- 
drews Church Yard. 

Died in Charleston, S. C. April 2, 1899, Mary Middleton 
Drayton, eldest child of Charles H. and Eliza M. Dray- 
ton, of Drayton Hall. Interred at Flat Rock, N. C. 

Died in Charleston 25 Octo. 1904, M". Susan Cochran 

*In the 3P* year of his age, William Cattell, Esq; Lieut. Col. 
of the First Regiment of South Carolina, on the Continental 
Establishment, and Member of Assembly for the Parish of St. 
Andrew. — South Carolina and American General Gazette, May 7, 
1778. 

tBenjamin Cattell's will was proved 10 January, 1783. Not 
dated, but signed about 21 April, 1782. 

$A11 the entries under this last head were written bv the late 
Mr. W. S. Hastie. 



106 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Moreland, widow of Andrew Moreland, aged 96 years, 
II months. Interred in St. Andrew's Church Yard. 

BAPTISMS. t 

At St. Andrews Church on 26 March 1893, by the Rev. 
Chas. J. Holt of St. James Church, Fordham, N. Y. 
Dorothy, daughter of WilHam M. Wallace and Helen Y. 
Wallace his wife. 

At Lambs, S. C. in St. Andrews Parish, on Tuesday April 
7, 1896, by the Rev'*. John Kershaw, Rector of St. Mich- 
aels Church, Charleston, S. C. William Gordon, son of 
William Montgomery, and Helen Yates Wallace his wife. 

At St. Andrews Church on Easter Day, April 1876, by the 
rector, the Rev**. John G. Drayton, Ella Drayton, daugh- 
ter of W". S. Hastie Jr. and Julia Drayton his wife. 

At St. Andrews Church on April 30, 1888 by the rector 
Rev'*. John Grimke Drayton, Charles Henry, Son of Chas. 
H. Drayton of "Drayton Hall." and Eliza M. Drayton, 
his wife. 

At Grace Church Charleston, S. C. May, 1897, Sallie Mor- 
ris, daughter of C. C. Pinckney Jr. of Runnymede in St 
Andrews Parish S. C. and Anne M. Pinckney his wife. 
By D'. C. C. Pinckney. 

:l:Written by Mr. W. S. Hastie. 

(The end) 



106 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Moreland, widow of Andrew Moreland, aged 96 years, 
1 1 months. Interred in St. Andrew's Church Yard. 

BAPTISMS.I 

At St. Andrews Church on 26 March 1893, by the Rev. 
Chas. J. Holt of St. James Church, Fordham, N. Y. 
Dorothy, daughter of WilHam M. Wallace and Helen Y. 
Wallace his wife. 

At Lambs, S. C. in St. Andrews Parish, on Tuesday April 
7, 1896, by the Rev". John Kershaw, Rector of St. Mich- 
aels Church, Charleston, S. C. William Gordon, son of 
William Montgomery, and Helen Yates Wallace his wife. 

At St. Andrews Church on Easter Day, April 1876, by the 
rector, the Rev*^. John G. Drayton, Ella Drayton, daugh- 
ter of W". S. Hastie Jr. and Julia Drayton his wife. 

At St. Andrews Church on x\pril 30, 1888 by the rector 
Rev"^. John Grimke Drayton, Charles Henry, Son of Chas. 
H. Drayton of "Drayton Hall," and Eliza M. Drayton, 
his wife. 

At Grace Church Charleston, S. C. May, 1897, Sallie Mor- 
ris, daughter of C. C. Pinckney Jr. of Runnymede in St 
Andrews Parish S. C. and Anne M. Pinckney his wife. 
By D^ C. C. Pinckney. 

1:Written by Mr. W. S. Hastie. 

(Tkc end) 



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CHILDSBURY. 
By Henry A. M. Smith. 

In the account of the old town of Childsbury, published 
in the October N°. of this Magazine, vol. XIV, p. 198, it was 
stated that the writer had never seen a copy of the plan of 
that town. Since then, through the kindness of Miss Anne 
S. Beas of Summerville, a plat of the Town has been placed 
in his hands and is now published with this addition to the 
account of the Town. 

This plat is on parchment but with time much of the 
writing has become hopelessly indecipherable. The en- 
dorsement states that the Town was laid out in 1707. This 
endorsement is signed by James Child himself. In the 
deed conveying some lots to Stephen Sarrasin, referred to 
in the previous article, the date of the Town plat is stated 
as 25 September, 1714, but among the papers loaned the 
writer, by Miss Deas, is a deed from James Child to his 
son Isaac Child, dated 20 Sept'., 1708, transferring "all 
"that moyety or halfe part of y" Strawberry Bloufe adjoin- 
"ing y" River Excepting Six Lotts given for a Schoole to 
"Gether w*" y" Marsh between y' bay & y' River Buting & 
"bounding as in y*" Towne platt Uppon y" River South 
"Westerly and North Westerly bounded out w*" Stakes & 
"South Easterly uppon y' Broad & Midle Street from y' 
"River to y" Parsonage Land & North Easterly by y' Streete 
"between y' Towne & y' Parsonage Land to Gether w'" all 
"y' Streets & Apurtenances Containing to gether Sixty two 
"Acres & halfe all ways Excepting the Six Lotts w'" y' 
"Marsh between y" River & y*" Bay given for a Schoole to be 
"built Uppon as is Excepted & Alsoe Excepting one Acre 
"& halfe of Land as it is bounded out w'" Locuss Trees to 
"Build a Church uppon & alsoe that five hundred acres of 
"y' Strawberry Land & Plantation bounding North West- 
"erly uppon Mebkin Plantation together w*" y' Ceader 
"Swampe adjoining to ye River Southwesterly have Given 
"granted & by these Presents doe freely Clearly and Ab- 
"solutely give & Grante Unto my S'* son Isaac Child to him 



108 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

"& his heirs Lawfully of his Body for Ever To have all y' 
"said Land & to Keape & tend the ferry I also Give him 
"one Lott Cald y' ferry Lott Soe Longe as he keeps y' 
"ferry uppon y" Condition that he y*" S* Isaac Child or his 
"heirs Shall not Wilfully hinder y' Aforsd Moyety or halfe 
"part of y' towne hereafter from being settled But to 
"Promote it to y' Utmost of his or their Power." 

This deed refers to a Town plan in existence and that 
plan was evidently the old parchment one dated 1707. 

On this old plat no names are given to the streets — at 
least if they were ever written they are wholly indecipher- 
able — and in the above deed the street referred to is not by 
name but as "y' Broad & Midle Streete from y'' River." 

There is also among Miss Deas' papers a lease dated i 
October 1712, from James Child styling himself of "Childs- 
berry Towne" to William Skinner, whereby he leases "all 
"that Tann House with the Barke Barne & Tan fats with 
"all the Land Buting to Blackwells Street and Northeast- 
"ernly to the River Bay with a Line Southeasternly fifty- 
"five degree to Kitts Spring & the same coast to the Ceader 
"Swampe with all the Timber & trees & underwood to fell 
"at his pleasure to Clear the ground for Corne & rice & 
"make fencing * * * (except one acre of the hill if 
"there should be Use for a fort not other waies & one 
"Chaine Square for a pond)." 

There was a later plat with the names of the streets. In 
1893 M''. A. G. Rose copied a plat which was lent her by 
the late M'. Elias Ball, together with a number of papers 
referring to Childsbury. 

According to the statement on this plat it was made by 
Francis Lejau for the Trustees of the Free School at 
Childsberry but no date is given. On this plat the names 
and widths of the streets are given, but the names of those 
to the North and South could not be deciphered by her. 
This plat was probably copied from the plat of 1714 re- 
ferred to in the deed to Sarrasin, at any rate it is a later 
plat than the one in Miss Deas' possession, which appears 
to have been the original one made by James Child himself. 
On the last mentioned plat the explanation on the left hand 
margin is as follows : 



CHILDSBURY 109 

"A plan of Childsberry Town on the Western branch of 
"Cooper River containing One Hundr" & Twenty-five Acres 
"of Land Lay' Out this Forme by M'. James Child deceas^ 
"Who gave this Land for this Publick use. Besides 600 acres 
"of (illegible) Land to y' Inhabitants of the Towne for 
"Comoning of Two Cows to a Lott & no more. One (illeg- 
"ible) of ground to build a Church on & for y' Church yard. 
"Five acres to build a college on, a piece of Land for y' 
"Market in y° middle of the Town. One Acre to Erect a 
"Fort on One Lott N". 16 for y' building a Latin School on > 
"also 100 pounds towards y' building y' s" school and 500 
"pounds y' Interest of w'" for y' Sallery of a Master. All 
"which this Charitable and Public Spirited Person Be- 
"queath"* by his Last Will for y' Uses Above 

"Mentioned 
"To the 

"Gentlemen w^hose names are in y' mergent That are y" 
"Trustees & subscribers to the Free School at Childsberry. 
"This Plan is to them Presented for their Use by Their 
"Humble Servant. 

"Francis Lejau." 

"Explanation. 

"Childs Square C The College No 96 

"Dixe's Square D The Churchyard No 120 

"The Market No 50 The Lott for y' School No 16 

"In all 184 Lotts 
"All y' Front lots are 330 foot long and 66 foot wide or 

" acres in all y' lots that have 8 lots in a 

"Square are 115 foot wide and 165 foot long 

"All y' Lotts that have 10 lots in a Square are 105 foot 

"wide and 165 foot long." 

The names of the trustees and subscribers in the margin 
as deciphered by M". Rose were : 

1. M^ Francis Williams Deceas". 

2. Daniell Huger Esq 

3. The Hon : Coll Thomas Broughton 

4. M'. James Child Deceas". The Founder 

5. Nathaniel Broughton 



110 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

6. M'. John Gongh 

7. The Rev. M'. Thomas Hasell 

8. Anthony Bonneau 

9. Capt John Harleston 

10. Capt Elias Ball 

11. Capt Thomas Cordes 

12. M'. Andrew Broiighton 

13. John Gibbes Esq 

14. M^ John Sabb 

15. M"". Archibald Hamilton 

16. M'. Francis Lejau 

17. M^ (illegible) 

18. M\ Zechariah Villepontoux 

Ihe minutes of the Trustees of the Free School from 
August, 1750, to July, 1754, are aniong the papers copied 
by M". Rose and show the school in active operation dur- 
ing that period. A memorandum by the late M'. W. J. Ball 
states that he remembered well the remains of a large por- 
tion of the wall of the school building as standing in his 
boyish days. 

That the fairs were actually held appears from the fol- 
lowing extracts from the Day Book of Elias Ball, viz : 

"May 24, 1727. To the Pasturage of y' Horse at 40/ 
"per mo: the Horse taken away June 15. June 18 — 
"Brought w*" annother & stayed till 14 Days before y' fair 
"in Oct 4 Mo : at 40 / per month each. — 1731 — Octo George 
"Brown House Carpenter D'. To 50 / he had to 

"go to the fair £2.10. And in the Carolina Gazette 

for the week 8*" to 15*" Oct 1750 this notice appears — 
"Childsberry Fair will begin on Tuesday 30*" inst and con- 
"tinue 'till the Friday Evening following as usual. There 
"vv-ill be some pretty diversions." 

From a printed paper purporting to be a copy of a peti- 
tion or memorial of James Child to Parliament it appears 
that he was "late of the Parish of Amersham in the County 
"of Bucks" and not from Coleshill in the Parish of Aug- 
mondi in the County of Hertford as supposed in the pre- 
vious article in this Magazine. This petition states that 
Lord Chancellor Jefifreys in 1684 had cast James Child into 



CHILDSBURY 111 

custody for not delivering up an exemplification in his pos- 
session of a charter of several liberties and privileges 
granted to the Parish of Amersham by King Henry the 
Fourth, and that in consequence of this hard usage "the 
"said James Child was put to Exceeding Charges which 
"with the loss of his Time, and the Noise of his being a 
"Prisoner and that the late Lord Chancellour had Threat- 
"ened his Ruine made his Creditors call in their Moneys 
"whereby he was forced to Abscond and to sell an Estate 
"worth above 2000 1 for 1800 1 and hath at this time a Wife 
"and Eight Children and nothing to depend on but the 
"Charity of Friends." 

A note in the handwriting of John Ball of Kensington 
states that James Child being forced to fly came to South 
Carolina and that his son Isaac was the only son w^ho came 
to America 

The first evidence on the record of James Child's pres- 
ence in Carolina is in 1698, and as Lord Chancellor Jeffrys 
and the Stuart regime ended in 1688 it does not appear to 
be certain that he came to Carolina for refuge. 

The will of James Child mentions no descendants except 
his son Isaac Child and Isaac Child's children and two other 
grandchildren, viz : Robert Dixe and Hannah Dixe. The 
follow^ing record of the descendants of James Child is 
taken from Isaac Child's Bible, viz : 

"Isaac Child & Marg*. Tunsteed Daug'. of Fran\ Tun- 
'steed and Marg*. his v/ife was married June y' i : 1710 

"James Child son of Isaac Child was born feb'' y^ 15: 
'1712 and Dyed feb'' 21" 1712 

"Willi" Child Son of Isaac Child was born y' 12 of feb'' 

'1713 
"Sarah Child Daugh' of Isaac Child was born March .y' 

'11: 1715 

"Isaac Child Son of Isaac Child was born May y' 18: 
'1717 

"Hannah Child Daugh"" of Isaac Child was born Aug* 
'27: 1719. 

"Lydia Child Daugh' of Isaac Child was born Sept^ 
'y' 22 : 1 72 1 



112 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

"Maray Child Daugh' of Isaac Child was born y' 20 of 
"May 1724 

"Eliza'' Child Daugh' of Isaac Child was born Oct' y* 
"28: 1727 and Dyed 1728 

"My Father Isaac Child Dyed Nove'. y' 10: 1734 Aged 59 

"My Brother Will™ Child Died March y" 24: 1738 Aged 

"My Mother Marg*. Child Died Nov' y" 23: 1738 Aged 

"My Brother Isaac Child Died feb''. y' 23 : 1742 Aged 25 

"My Sister Mary Thomas Died Jan'' y' 3 : 1744 Aged 20 

"My Sister Sarah Harleston Died Janery y' 12: 1756 
"Aged 41 

"My Sister Hannah Harleston Died April 20: 1763 
"Aged 44 

"Lydia Ball Died April i^\ 1765 Aged 43 years & 6 
"months 

"Mary Child Daugh' to Isaac Child was married to Sam' 
Thomas June y' 5 : 1 740 

"Lydia Child was married to George Chicken feb'' y' 5. 
"1740 

Catherine Chicken Daugh' of George & Lydia his wife 
"was bom Jany'' y*" 29: 1741 friday 3 o clock 

"Hannah Child was married to John Harleston Feb'' y* 
19: 1740. 

"George Chicken Died March y' 2: 1745 aged 36 

^'Lydia Chicken was married to Elias Ball Jan'' 28 : 1747" 

There is no record of it in the Bible but it is elsewhere 
stated in these papers that Sarah Child married Nicholas 
Harleston. 

The earliest mention of the name Strawberry appears to 
be in the Act of 17 February 1705 which declares that "y* 
"Inhabitants of the Eastern & Western Branches of y' T 
"of Cooper River are willing at their own proper Cost & 
"Charge to make a fferry at y'" Plantation of M'. James 
"Childs Known comonly by y' name of y" Strawberry 
"Plantation." 



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Address: South Carolina Historical Society, 

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^crnqjoim/Qmed . 



-.»-«> 



THE 



SOUTH CAROLINA 



HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 
MAGAZINE 




PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY THE 

SOUTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



VOLUME XV.. NO. 3, 



JULY. 1914 



Entered at the Post-office at Charleston, S. C, an 
Second-Class Matter. 



Printed for the SpcieTY by 

WALKER, EVANS <f> COGSWELL CO 

Charleston, 5. C. 

1914 



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE. 

JusEPH W. Barnwell, Henry A. M. Smith, 

A. S. Salley, Jr. 

EDITOR OF THE MAGAZINE. 
Mabel L. Webber. 



CONTENTS. 

Six Letters of Peter Manigault 114 

Order Book of John F. Grimke 124 

Parish Register of St. James Santee 133 

Historical Notes 144 



N. B. — These Magazines, with the exception of No. i 
of Vol. I, are $1.25 to any one other than a member of the 
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Any member who has not received the last number 
will please notify the Secretary and Treasurer, 

Miss Mabel L. Webber, 

South Carolina Historical Society, 

Charleston, S. C. 



m%X(jyK) 




The South Carolina 

Historical and Genealogical 

Magazine. 

VOL. XV. July, 19 14. Nq ^ 

SIX LETTERS OF PETER MANIGAULT. 

The letters printed below form part of the manuscript 
collection of the South Carolina Historical Society. They 
are fragments only of an extensive series of letters, now 
much scattered, which until recently had been kept intact 
by the Manigault family. 

Peter Manigault, the writer, was the only child of 
Gabriel Manigault, an eminent merchant of Charles Town, 
by his wife, Ann, daughter of Mr. John Ashby.' The let- 
ters were written from London, where Peter had been sent 
when he was eighteen, in the care of a Mr. Corbett, to 
complete his education, and to study law. He returned to 
South Carolina in 1754 and promptly began to practise his 
profession. In 1755 he was elected to the Commons House 
of Assembly from the Parish of St. Thomas and St. Denis, 
and was continued a member for eighteen years, being 
elected Speaker three different times. He married in 1755, 
Miss Elizabeth Wragg, and had four children, two sons, 
Gabriel and Joseph, and two daughters. Peter Manigault 
died in 1773. in London, where he had gone for his health. 

In the article on the Manigault family in the Transac- 
tions of the Huguenot Society, it is mentioned that Peter 
Manigault had an armorial book-plate made in 1754, which 
is subsequent to the letters here reproduced. Several of 

'See Transactions of the Huguenot Society of S C, No 4 1897 
pp. 48-84. for a sketch of the Manigault family. 



114 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

these old book-plates are in existence and show no resem- 
blance to any of the seals used on these letters.' 

Address^" : For — 

M" Manigault 
In 
South Carolina 

London 26'" June 1750 
Hon'. Madam 

You can't imagine the Uneasiness it gives me, to hear 
by my Fathers Letter to M' Corbett, that you continue to 
afflict yourself upon Account of my Absence, But if I may 
judge of you by myself, I dont wonder at it, for though 
for some time before I left you, I endeavoured to behave 
myself with Unconcern, yet my joyful Countenance was 
the Covering of a heavy Heart, I never once thought seri- 
ously of leaving you, and my Dear Father, but it put the 
greatest Damp upon my Spirits, and Parting I thought I 
never should have been able to have gone through. 

I have now been in England three Weeks, and in Lon- 
don, Seventeen Days, I have, in this short time, had an 
Opportunity of seeing some of the Diversions that this great 
City afifords and if I did not confess it to be a much finer 
Place, than I have ever seen before, I should shew great 
Want of Skill, yet I see nothing in it, that would make me 
quit my Native Country. I find every thing in general 
much cheaper here than in Carolina, and it is well that it is 
so, for there are so many Ways of Spending Money that 
one never would have thought of, that if Things, were not 
in common very reasonable, it would be impossible for 
one to live here. 

'Tis surprising to see how well M" Corbett looks, I 
think I never saw so great an alteration in any Body in my 
Life, except in M^ Millechamp, at whose House I lodged 
one Night in my Journey from Bristol, M". Millechamp 
and M". Corbett send their Compliments to you, I dined 
one day last week, with M^ Morley, M^ Fury, M\ Aber- 



'Mr. M. Alston Read kindly blazoned the seals found on the 
letters. 



SIX LETTERS OF PETER MANIGAULT 115 

cromby, and several other gentlemen, that have been in 
Carolina. I saw Neilson t'other day at the Carolina Coffee 
House, he looks terribly. Vanderdussen, rolls round the 
Town, very grandly in his Carriot, he is going to Carolina 
soon, But to Boston first. M''. Fenwicke, with Miss Sally 
whom he is to carry with him, in Lieu of his child, is to go 
your Way soon. Capt Summersett is always teizing me 
to dine with him, sometimes at one place, and sometimes 
at another; he gave me an Invitation, as he says, from Sir 
Peter Warren, to dine with him on the 28th of this Month, 
somewhere in the Country. I should be very glad of hav- 
ing the Honour to dine with Sir Peter, but am resolved 
never to see him, till I can do it with better company. 

I pray you give my Love to my Unckle Ashby, and Aunt 
Whitter, and to my Cousins in general, but particularly to 
Miss Banbury & Miss Hasell, my Compliments to M'. and 
M''. Stead, M"'. Johnson, and M' . Cramahi, tell M\ Crama- 
hi the Wlgg he left on board Capt M'Taggart is not yet 
sold, but that when 'tis, the Capt will make the Returns. 
My Compliments also to my particular Friend M'. Rut- 
ledge. 

Be assured. Dear Madam, I have not forgot, nor ever 
will forget, the good advice I have often had from you; 
but that I shall always endeavour to behave my self as he 
ought who subscribes himself 

Your dutiful Son 

Peter Manigault 



London July 4*" i750"'' 
Hon*. Madam 

It gave me great pleasure to hear by M" Brails ford that 
you were all well. She brought the Red birds you were 
so kind to send me as far as Dover, but in coming up to 
London, the Poor creatures died in the Post Chaise; It 

*This letter is sealed with red wax, showing the following 
arms: Argent a chevron gules between three leopard heads 
crowned. It is interesting to note that these arms seem to be a 
variant of those of Ashby of Quenly, County Leicester, England, 
to which family Ann Ashby, mother of Peter Manigault, is known 
to have belonged. 



116 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

was a very great loss to me, as I depended upon them for 
a Present; however, If I never meet with any greater Dis- 
appointments, I can easily put up with such Trifles. I 
went yesterday to pay M". Blakeway a Visit, but shall not 
be fond of continuing them, as you seem to disapprove of it. 
M" Motte is just come from Bath, & looks exceeding well 
her son is just come from Holland, & looks like a ghost, I 
never saw any poor Wretch so altered, his Leggs are scarce 
able to bear him : He has made a fine Voyage of it! I am 
to set out for Hull on Monday Morning early; Capt Reas- 
ton is arrived there; I suppose I shall see him, & he will 
introduce me to my Friends there. I shall stay there as 
short a time as possible, because 'tis a very disagreeable 
Place, M'. Blake & Drayton are to be the Companions of 
my Journey. 

I shall write to you from some place in the Country to 
let you know how I go on, as some Vessel or other will 
sail in about a Months time, perhaps you wonder M'. Cor- 
bett does not go with me : I am apt to believe he thinks is 
no Occasion for an Inspector into my xA.ctions. Your Aunt 
Broughton died the 28*" of May last; By her Death, some 
Money which was left by her Sister, will come to be di- 
vided betwixt you, & the rest of her Brothers & Sister's 
Children : M"" Johnson is her Executor, & I believe will get 
considerable by her Death. As she was a Quaker, she was 
buried very privately, for nobody besides myself, except 
the People of the House was at her Funeral. I send by 
this Opportunity the stays you wrote for : M" Corbett is to 
buy the Mufif & Tippet while I am out of Town. I wish 
you may be pleased with it, as you have not mentioned 
what particular Sort you would have. When I come from 
the Country, I am to go into the Temple, which is the only 
place in London that I should like to live in. As I am a 
Judge of the Conveniences & Inconveniences of every Man- 
ner of Life, & have pitched upon this as the most suitable 
to my age & Inclinations, I am sure neither you nor my 
Father, will be against it, especially as I have M^ Corbett 
of my side. This I am sure of. that let me live wherever 
I will, I shall never either by Omission or Commission, be 
guilty of any thing unbecoming your Son, to tell the Truth, 



SIX LETTERS OF PETER MANIGAULT 117 

I am very sorry to leave both M'. & M" Corbett, as they 
have both of them behaved extremely properly to me, upon 
all Occasions ; but my Manner of Life with them, is not 
such as I could wish, & therefore, whatever my Regard 
may be for them, I must move my Quarters. I am sure I 
wish you were in England, that I might have a Home to go 
to. You seem to think I shall not like to return to Carolina, 
but you are very much mistaken, for I can like no Place 
where you are not, and when a proper time comes, nothing 
will please me more than to return to my native Country, 
where I hope we shall one Day meet again, which be the 
greatest Pleasure in the World, to 

Your dutiful & affectionate Son 

Peter Manigault. 
Please excuse me to those of my Friends I have not 
written to. I shall write to them all as soon as I return to 
Town. 



Addressed: To 

M' Gabriel Manigault 
In 
South Carolina* 
per Capt 1 

Crosthwaite j 

London August i" 1750 
Hon'' Sir 

My last to you was of the 25"* June, which went by the 
Way of Bristol in Capt Rogers; — since which I have one 
Letter to Mama, w'" I sent in a Vessell to Port Royal. I 
have not yet had the Pleasure of a Line from either of 
you, & am now out of all hopes of one, till you have first 
heard from me. 

I find the Gentlemen here extremely civil to me, upon 
your Account, especially those you gave me Letters for; 

*Seal on this letter shows without tinctures, simply a lion 
rampant. As this is one of the commonest heraldic charges it is 
impossible to assign it without tincture to aid one. It is curious 
to note, however, that Burke gives as the arms of several families 
of Ashley, also of County Leicester, England, a lion rampant, tinc- 
tures varying with the branch. 



118 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

I have seen M\ Robert Johnson, he wonders he has not 
had a Letter from you, he read to me, a Paragraph of a 
Letter, which he told me he sent to you, some time ago, in 
which he mentions M\ Pourroy's Death. M' Pourroy has 
left his whole Estate to his Housekeeper. M'. Corbett has 
seen his Will, and will, no doubt, write you particularly 
about it. 

I send under the same Cover with this Letter, the two 
latest Magazines, and the Tryal of Capt. Clarke, for killing 
Capt Innis, in a Duel, which will give you a more par- 
ticular Account of that unfortunate Affair, than I am able 
to do. 

M' Austin, and my Cousin Broughton are arrived after 
a tedius Passage of ten Weeks; neither of them are yet 
come up to Town. 

I presume, upon my Knowledge of 5'^our Readiness to 
gratify me, in all my reasonable Desires, to ask a Favour of 
you, which I doubt not I shall obtain, 'tis to give me your 
Consent to buy a Watch, which in my present Situation, is a 
very necessary Article, but as tis an Article of extraordi- 
nary Expence, I am not willing, to trouble M' Corbett 
about it, without your Approbation. 

I shall continue to make the best Use of time, by a 
vigorous Pursuit of my Studies, in order to enable me to 
return the sooner home; for though I have been absent 
but a little while, and I like England tolerably well, I could 
return with a great deal of Pleasure immediately. 

I remain with my duty to Mama 

Your dutiful Son 

Peter Manigault. 



Addressed: 


To 






M" 


Gabriel 


Manigault 








In 








South Carolina* 



*The seal on this letter shows, within a lozenge, a griffin ram- 
pant; no tinctures shown. The use of a lozenge instead of the 
martial shield to carry the arms shows that this seal was cut for 
a woman, according to accepted heraldic usage. 



SIX LETTERS OF PETER MANIGAULT 119 

per Capt ^ 
Crosthwaite I* 

O. D. C. J 

London 7*^ August 1750 
Hon" Sir 

I this day received your first Letter of the Eighth of 
June, by which, I am very glad to find you have all been 
well, since I left you, & hope your Health will continue. 
I am sorry to hear you and Mama, continue under so great 
Concern, & shall do my best Endeavours, to please you in 
every Thing. I think I may be bold enough to say I have 
behaved myself as •! ought, in all Respects, ever since I left 
you; but as I am conscious to myself, that I am not a 
Judge of my own actions, I refer you, wholly, to what M'. 
Corbett, w^ho certainly is a Judge, shall say to you. upon 
that subject. I do not pretend to vindicate myself, or 
extenuate my Faults, I confess I have been guilty of a 
great Deal of Misbehaviour, but as I am heartily sorry for 
it, and firmly resolved, to mend in every Particular, I hope 
you will forgive me all, and let my future Conduct, blot 
out all Remains of my former Indiscretions. I am con- 
vinced, that Persons who have had more Experience, must 
know better than I do, and I shall be very fond of any 
Advice, my Friends shall give me. I hope, you will take 
no notice, of anything that may be said to my Disadvan- 
tage, either in Carolina, or England, but as you have put 
me solely under the Care of M^ Corbett, you will acquiesce, 
in whatever he says of me, especially as you know, he has 
too much sense, to deceive you, in so tender a Point. M^ 
Abercromby has been very kind to me, for which I have 
often expressed my Thanks, and as you desire it, (if he 
was not agreeable to me) I shall visit him frequently, I 
beg Leave to refer you to what I wrote by Capt. White, 
and remain (being heartily sorry for having ever ofifended 
you and firmly resolved to make it my whole Business to 
please, and be agreeable to you in all things.) 

Your dutiful Son 

Pet^ Manigault. 



120 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Addressed: To 

M"". Gabriel Manigatilt 
In 

South Carolina* 
By Capt. 1 
M'Kenzie r 

O. D. C. J 

London March 13'" 1752 
Hon''. Sir 

I should be guilty of Ingratitude in the highest Degree, 
if I did not upon all Occasions willingly acquiesce in every 
thing, that you think for my good. From this Principle it 
is, that I have no manner of Objection to continuing with 
M^ Corbett, till I am of age, as you are inclined that I 
should, & as our perfect Knowledge of one another, makes 
it beyond all doubt that we shall agree in every thing. It 
gives me no small uneasiness to find, that anything that 
ever came from me. should instead of giving you Pleasure, 
have the Contrary Effect, & I am very angry with myself 
for giving you cause to reproach me, with omitting to 
write, not only as tis a Neglect of My Duty, but as it is 
also a Neglect, of what ought to give me, & really does 
give me. the greatest Pleasure. I am sorry to find Sir, 
that you construe into a Demand, which was only meant as 
a Petition, Far be such Presumption from me, as to pretend 
to teach you your Duty! I wrote what I did, because I had 
never heard any thing from you, upon that subject, and I 
thought you would be glad to know my Inclinations : And 
this I did, not upon the credit of my own Opinion, but first 
took M"" Corbetts Advice. And as to the Reasons I gave 
for my Opinion, was it not natural for me to think that 
you would be pleased to see, that I advanced Nothing, but 
what I could give a Reason for. But since I see my Incli- 
nations do not suit with your desires, I heartily submit 
myself to what you think proper & shall only add upon this 
subject, that I am concerned to see you were angry because 
the most distant Hint of your Dislike to any thing, is with 
me sufficient Reason to disapprove of it. As you are so 



*This letter is sealed with an intaglio, the bust of a Roman 
soldier in armor. 



SIX LETTERS OF PETER MANIGAULT 121 

kind to offer me the Liberty of returning to Carolina, im- 
mediately after I am of Age; or of staying sometime 
Longer abroad; I am willing to be directed in that Respect, 
intirely by you; however if my Inclinations, provided they 
are not unreasonable, are in that case to govern, (upon 
mature Deliberation of the many advantages that may 
accrue from a longer stay here,) I would not, without your 
Desire, leave England, till this time two year, and would 
imploy all the intermediate time, in a close Application to 
my Improvement. But as I presume you would like to 
know particularly, how I would bestow myself during so 
long a space, so I ought in duty to inform you, that I would 
chuse to stick close to my Books, all this Summer, in 
London, & in the fall, go the Northern Circuit & then 
have an Opportunity of seeing such Relations as I have 
in that part of England. The next winter, I would also 
chuse to spend in London, & omit nothing, that can pos- 
sibly be of any advantage to me. Early in the Spring, I 
hope you wont be against my going to France, & seeing 
some parts of Holland and Flanders; in this Excursion I 
promise myself that besides other useful Attainments, I 
shall with the help of what I understand already, make 
myself a compleat Master of the French Tongue. I should 
like to return to England, in the beginning of the next 
winter, which will be chiefly taken up, in preparing myself 
for my return in the Spring; when I could like to take an 
Opportunity of going to Boston, & travelling by land to 
Charlestown, where I would not propose to be, till the 
Month of October. — This Sir is the scheme I have formed 
to myself, but submit it entirely to you, & will gladly alter 
or leave out, any part of it, as you shall think fit, or more, 
or less necessary, for my Improvement; But upon the 
whole Sir, this you may depend upon, that I don't want 
to lengthen my stay here, either out of Fondness for Eng- 
land, or any Dislike to Carolina, but merely for the sake 
of my Improvement, & that if that were out of the Case, 
you could not recall me sooner, than I would be willing to 
return. 

I have written to Mama by Capt Pearson who sails about 
the same time with the Vessel that carrys this; Capt Pear- 



122 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

son has on Board with some Things in it for Mama, There 
is in the same Box, five Magazines, and four Volumes of 
a Book called Amelia, all which I hope, will get safe to 
hand. 

Be pleased to make my Compliments to M'. Rutledge, & 
other inquiring Friends, & believe me to be your 
Most dutiful Son 

Peter Manigault. 



Addressed For 

M" Manigault 

S" Car' 

York 20*" July 1752. 
Hon'' Madam 

I should be at a Loss to find an Excuse, for not giving 
you an Account of my Travels as I know you expect it. 
I suppose you dont desire I should trouble you with a 
Particular Relation of every day's Proceeding, as that 
would be both tedious & unentertaining : I set out then, 
from London this day fortnight, in Company with M'. 
Blake, Drayton, & two other gentlemen of [the] Temple 
whom you know nothing of. I believe there never was a 
more agreeable Party [missing] any Scheme in the World. 
I am sure there never was a more sober one, for we five 
often found it difficult to demolish a single Pint of Wine, 
We travelled with great Pleasure till we got to Stamford 
in Lincolnshire, where Squire Drayton fell ill. This de- 
tained us two days, & only served to whet the Edge of our 
Impatience. & give us greater alacrity to proceed to Hull. 
The polite Capt Reaston (for I must upon this Occasion 
call him so,) waited for us at a Place called Barton, & 
conducted us over a large Ferry, of about five miles to 
Hull. When he got us there, he insisted upon it, that 
Blake. Drayton & myself, should lodge with him, as we 
had before parted with the other two Gentlemen ; We all 
refused, till his Mother came in, & made the same Request, 
(which we, being too well bred to refuse any Thing to the 
Lady, immediately granted.) Reaston's Mother & his 
Sister too, seem to be mighlly good Sort of People. & ex- 



SIX LETTERS OF PETER MANIGAULT 123 

pressed great Kindness for you, & all their other Relations 
abroad. While we were with Capt Reaston, we spent a 
day at Hornsea; we went thither to see Mr Acklom, [?] 
but he was not at home. Our Labour however was not 
lost, for beside a delicious Bathe in the Sea, Master Reas- 
ton carried us to dine with an old Aunt of his, a very 
ancient Woman, who was in perfect Possession of all her 
Senses, & could w-rite & read without Spectacles, though 
Eighty Nine years of Age. We tarried at Hull but three 
days ; we should have spent more time there, but knew it 
must be inconvenient to the good Folks, as they have not 
been much used to entertain Company. We left Hull on 
the Wednesday Sennight after we came from London, & 
got that very Night to York. We are now diverting our- 
selves with attending the Courts for that is the only Diver- 
sion we can find tis well tis a good one! 

I had almost forgot to tell you our Method of travelling. 
M^ Blake rides on Horseback, & Drayton & I, have a Post 
Chaise between us. As none of us had that necessary & 
indispensable Convenience, a Servant, we clubbed for one, 
who Proves a very sober honest Sort of a Fellow, & to 
borrow an Expression made use of among Jockeys, he is 
a knowing one. I shall write to you often while I am upon 
my Journey, as well for my owm pleasure, as to satisfy you. 
which is the Business of my Life. I hope you will be 
pleased at my going into the Temple. As I am now of an 
Age to be able to judge a Little for myself, I must confess 
I think it the properest Place for me. I mention'd this, 
because some People think, (though tis no Credit to their 
Understandings) that the Temple is a very wild place, 
which is by no means true ; however for argument sake 
allow that tis, yet you cant be against my removing thither 
from Bow Street, which is situated in the very Center of 
all the bad Houses in Convent Garden. Be pleased to as- 
sure my good Father of my sincerest Duty & Afifection, 
& pay my proper Respects to all who are kind enough to 
enquire after, your dutiful Son 

Peter Manigault. 

I am almost ashamed to send you such a Letter as this. 
But as I am at an Inn I am persauded you will excuse me. 



ORDER BOOK 
of 

John Faitcheraud Grimke. 
August 1778 to May 1780. 

(Continued from the April Ann ber) 

Silver Bluff. April 28*". 1779. 
28 : Parole. Thornhill. C : S : Tremble. Traytor. 
F : O : for the Day tomorrow. Major Armstrong 
B: M. Cap'. Raiford 

28: The Gen'. Court Martial of which Major Horry is 
president have reported John Anderson, a private of the 
first S°. Carolina Regiment charged with deserting his 
Command at Purisburgh & attempting to go to the Enemy 
— found guilty & Sentenced to be Shot to Death. The 
General approves the Sentence & directs the Execution to 
be on Friday next in the Morning at 10 oClock. 

William Caldwell a follower of the Camp charged with 
abusing the Waggon Master — acquitted. 

Cap'. Taylor of the N°. Carolina Brigade arrested for 
Drunkenness & abusive Language to the Commanding 
Officer of the Regiment — acquitted of the former & found 
Guilty of the latter, but having already suffered by being 
a considerable time in arrest, the Court (thinking his pun- 
ishment has been adequate to the Crime) recommend that 
he be relieved from the Arrest. 

The Gen', approves the Sentence & orders Cap'. Taylor 
to return to his Duty. 

Rowland Williams, a private of the first S". Carolina 
reg'. charged with Desertion, acquitted. 

George Thompson charged with Desertion. — acquitted. 

John Mars of the 2*". S° Carolina reg'. charged with 
Desertion, found Guilty & Sentenced to be Shot to Death. 
The General approves the Sentence & directs the Execution 
to be on Friday next in the Morning at 10 oClock, 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKE 125 

William Davis of the Sixth S°. Carolina Reg', charged 
with Desertion & Sentenced to receive lOO Lashes on his 
bare back with Switches. 

The General approves the Sentence & directs it to be put 
in Execution tomorrow Morning at Guard Mounting. 

Benjamin Barker of the 5th S° Carolina regiment, 
charged with Desertion, found guilty & sentenced to re- 
ceive One hundred Lashes on the bare back with Switches. 
The Gen', approves the Sentence & directs it to be put in 
Execution to morrow Morning at Guard Mounting. 

John Ouandrean of the first S". Carolina reg'. found 
guilty & Sentenced to receive One hundred Lashes on his 
bare back with Switches — The Gen. approves the Sentence 
& directs it to be put in Execution tomorrow Morning at 
Guard Mounting. 

Major Gresham private of the 4*" N. Carolina reg'. 
charged with Desertion, found guilty & sentenced to re- 
ceive 100 lashes on his bare back with Switches. The 
General approves the Sentence & directs it to be put in 
Execution tomorrow Morning at Guard Mounting. 

The Court is dissolved. 

The Drums are to beat as usual. 

29'". Parole. Virtue. C : S : Vining. Vose. 

F. O. for the Day tomorrow, Major Eaton 

B : M : Lieut'. Hamilton. 

Mr. Waties is appointed a Confidential Officer attendant 
on Gen'. Huger. all Orders from the Gen', conveyed 
through him are to be obeyed & he respected accordingly. 
A: O: 

One Cap*. 2 Sub'. 2. Serj". & 50 Rank & File from the 
S". Carolina Brigade, i. Capt. 2. Sub\ 2. Serj'\ & 50 Rank 
& File from the N. Carolina Brigade for fatigue tomorrow 
to be paraded at Head Quarters at Sunrise, with their 
Arms Baggage & two Days provisions cooked. The Q. M. 
Gen', will supply the party with a Waggon to carry the 
Tools Baggage & two Days forage for the Horses. 

April 30, 1779 Silver Bluff. 
30. Parole. C: S. 

F : O : for the day tomorrow Major Pinckney 



126 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

B : M. Cap'. Raiford. 

The Field Officer for the day is to direct all Executions 

Extract from Gen'. Orders given at Head Quarters of 
the Grand Army March 1 1 "\ 1 779. 

That the returns of the Army may be similar in every 
respect, & regularly transmitted — The Commander in Chief 
directs the following regulations : 

i''. In the Column under Officers present fit for Duty 
are to be included all such as are fit to go into Action, on 
Guards Detachments & c". & c". 

2". The Officers & Non Commissioned Officers, sick 
present, sick absent, On furlough, recruiting. Vacancies, 
On Command, in arrest, on the Staff, prisoners of War 
&c'*. &c''. &c'*. are to be inserted in the proper Columns 
under the Body of the Brigade returns numerically, but in 
the regimental returns the absent Officers Names are to be 
inserted with the places where, & reasons for, & time of 
Absence; the Sick present & Vacancies to be noted Numer- 
ically on the proper Lines in such manner in both returns 
that the sick & absent officers together with the Vacancies 
added to the present fit for Duty will exactly amount to 
the Establishment. 

3". Under rank & file in the first Column are to be 
inserted all Men fit for dut}^ in which Number are to be 
included all Officers, Waiters belonging to the Army who 
are ever to go on Duty with their Masters — making part 
of the Detail, all Soldiers employed with their Corps as 
Artificers or Tradesmen, all Guards in Camp or its Vicinity 
within alarming Distances, in a word, all the rank & File 
capable of doing any kind of Duty within the aforesaid 
Limits are to be included. 

4'". In the Second the Sick in Camp, judged so by their 
regimental Surgeons or so near Camps as to be attended 
by them. 

5'". The third to contain all sick absent in Hosp'. or else 
where to far distant from Camp to be attended by their 
regimental Surgeons; and underneath are to be particu- 
larly noted the Hospitals or places at which they are sick. 

6'". The fourth to include all such as are on Detachment 
or on Command too far distant from their respective 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKE 127 

regiments to join in case of an Alarm, and underneath the 
places where & kind of Duty they are upon to be exactly' 
noted. 

7*". In the fifth to be included such as are furloughed by 
Officers properly authorized. 

8'". And the Sixth to contain the totals of the Effectives, 
Rank & File. 

9'". Underneath zvanting to corn pleat, are to be inserted 
the Number of Serjeants, Drummers, & Fifers, & rank & 
File deficient of the Establishment. 

IO*^ Under Alterations since the last are to be inserted 
such Casualties as have happened since last Return, a Dis- 
crimination to be noted underneath such as have been dis- 
charged by the Muster Masters or for bodily inability, and 
those whose terms of Service have expired 

11*". Besides the weekly Alterations in the Monthly re- 
turn, all the Alterations in the Rank & File in the Month 
past are to be inserted regimentally, and the whole return 
compar'd with the one immediately preceeding it, with 
which it must be made to correspond, so that if it exceeds 
or falls short of the preceeding, the Augmentation or De- 
ficiency of Officers or Soldiers be accurately accounted for 
in the proper Casualties. 

12"'. On the back of each regimental & Brigade Return 
are to be inserted upon honor, the Number of Officers, 
Non Commissioned Officers & rank & file fit for Action, 
none are to be excluded who are returned fit for Duty but 
Waggoners, and such as are destitute of x^rms or Cloath- 
ing, who are to be inserted in separate Columns Viz'. 
Waggoners — Wanting Cloaths — Wanting Arms — The 
Totals of which added to the fit for Action, will amount to 
the present fit for Duty. 

13*". Regimental Returns to be made out weekly signed 
by the Commanding Officers of Regiments, & delivered the 
Commanding Officers of Brigades, who are to have them 
digested into Brigade Returns, which after they have care- 
fully examined & signed, they will transmit to the Adjutant 
General every Saturday at Orderly time. The Monthly 
returns to be delivered in the last Saturday of each Month 
successively, except of such Troops as are too far distant 



128 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

from Head Quarters to have their returns forwarded 
weekly. The Commanding Officers of such Troops are to 
have their Returns made out & transmitted to the Adju- 
tant Gen', the last Saturday save one, of each Month suc- 
cessively. These returns are by no means to be made 
known to any persons whatever except such as are im- 
mediately concerned in making & signing them, nor to be 
forwarded by any others except under a Sealed Cover. 
That the returns of an Army should be kept a profound 
secret, is a matter of the highest Importance & consequently 
should be conveyed by very trusty persons, by none under 
the Rank of a Commissioned Officer if possible. 

14*". The Officers Commanding regiments are to keep 
Books in which they are to have every return they make 
regularly recorded; also the Regimental Casualties, viz', 
the Dates of Deaths, Discharges, Desertions, Furloughs &c. 
&c. &c. that happen in a regiment. — The Commanding 
Officers of Brigades are also to have their Brigade returns 
recorded in Books kept for that purpose as also the Gen- 
eral, Division & Brigade Orders, together with Brigade 
Casualties; these Books to be constantly kept in the Reg", 
or Brigades, & in Case a Brigade or regiment should be 
reduced, said Books to be deposited in the Orderly Office. 

15'". Morning Reports of Companies are to be made 
every day signed by the eldest Officer of each present, to 
the Commanding Officer of the Regiment immediately after 
Roll Call in the Morning, which every Monday & Thursday 
are to be digested into Field Returns and to be delivered to 
the Officer Commanding the Brigade. 

I6*^ With the Monthly Returns are to be transmitted 
Returns of Cloathing, Arms, Ammunition & Accoutre- 
ments, to the Adj\ Gen'. All the forementioned Returns 
to be made according to the blank printed forms which 
shall be delivered them. 

I7'\ Size Rolls also according to the printed forms to 
be taken of Companies which are to be constantly Rep', by 
the Commanding Officer wath the Company. 

Silver Bluff May i". 1779. 
I : Parole C : S : 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKE 129 

F : O : for the day tomorrow Major Harleston. 

B : M : Cap\ Raiford. 

Gen'. Huger is appointed to take the Command of the 
Division of Continental Troops, composed of the North 
Carolina, S°. Carolina & Georgia Brigades. 

CoF. Pinckney will command the S°. Carolina Brigade. 
Cap'. Ladson of the first S°. Carolina regiment is ap- 
pointed Brigade Major to Col". Pinckney's Brigade, & is 
to be respected & obeyed accordingly. — 

Extract from Gen'. Orders. 

Head Quarters Middle Brook 
March 12'" 1779 

The honble the Congress have been pleased to come to a 
resolution of the 2*. Ins', appointing a Commissioner to 
settle & pay all Accounts of Arrearages of Cloathing due 
to the Troops of these State for the year 1777, the follow- 
ing parts of which are extracted for the government of all 
Officers concerned, and are to be carefully attended to. 

The General has the most perfect reliance that all Officers 
will contribute to the Execution of this resolve on principles 
of equal justice to the public & to the Soldiers imder their 
Com^ 

The Irregularity with which the Distributions of Qoath- 
ing have hitherto been involved, will make the utmost 
Circumspection necessary. 

"All Officers of the Army who have received Cloathing 
for the Troops, either of any Continental or State Cloth- 
iers, or by purchase or Impressment, are directed to render 
the Commissioner Aforesaid a Return of the same, & ac- 
counts v/ith him for their due application — 

That the Commander in Chief, and Officers Command- 
ing any separate Posts, do forthwith cause the Captains & 
Officers Com^. Companies in the Troops under their im- 
mediate command, to make out the Accounts of their re- 
spective Companies, specifying the Names of the Claimants 
still in the Service, where they are, what they have received, 
& what is still due, these points, in cases of Doubt to be 
ascertained by a particular Enquiry of the Officers, Non- 
commissioned Officers & privates of each Company. The 
Accounts thus formed & ascertained shall be delivered the 



130 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

regimental Pay Master, who shall draw them into a gen- 
eral one & settle the same with the Commissioner aforesaid ; 
and the Comm'. shall certify the sums due on such Ac- 
counts, & to whom; Whereupon Warrants shall issue for 
Payment in like manner as for Monthly pay of the Troops. 

That the same Regimental Pay Masters pay the Arrear- 
ages aforesaid to the Non Commissioned Officers & Soldiers 
themselves, or their representatives, to whom they are due, 
& account with the Commissioners aforesaid for the Monies 
they received for that use, producing the Receipts of the 
Non Commissioned Officers & soldiers or their representa- 
tives as Vouchers. 

And if upon such accounting their shall appear to be 
monies in the Pay Master's Hands, received for the Non 
Com''. Off'. & Soldiers who afterwards died or deserted, 
The said Commissioner shall certify the same to the pay- 
master Gen', or his Deputy at the post where the regiment 
of such paymaster is stationed, to whom he shall pay over, 
all such monies remaining in his hands. 

That all non Commissioned Officers & Soldiers [are] 
intitled to the Continental Bounty of Cloathing who served 
in the year 1777. but are not now in the Service & their 
representatives in case of Death shall also receive the 
Arrearages due for such Cloathing, provided that they 
produce or transmit to the Commissioner aforesaid Ac- 
counts thereof properly authenticated by the Certificates of 
the Officers under whom they immediately served, or other 
sufficient Evidence ; & the said Commissioner being satis- 
fied therewith, shall certify the Sums due or those Accounts 
Whereupon warrants shall issue as aforesaid for Payment. 

That as in the Course of this Enquiry it may appear that 
the Cloathing issued to divers Non Com^ Officers & Sol- 
diets for the year 1777. exceeds the Bounty allowed by 
Congress, the regimental pay masters shall enter the names 
of such in two separate Rolls for the Inspection of the 
Commissioners afresaid, who shall transmit one of them to 
the Paymaster Gen', or his Deputy, at the Posts — where 
the regiments may happen to be. & the other to the Com^. 
Officers of the regiments to which such Non Com". Officers 
& Soldiers belong, who shall thereupon be put under stop- 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKE 131 

pages, by Order of such Com^ Officers to the amount of 
the Surplusages of the allowed Bounty; for which the 
Regimental Paymasters shall account with the paymaster 
Gen', or his Deeputy aforesaid upon every application for 
the regimental Monthly Pay." 

Silver Bluff 2'. May 1779 
Parole. C. S. 

F. O. for the Day tomorrow, Lt. Col. Mayson. 

B. M. Cap'. Ladson. 

F. O. for to day (vice Major Harleston) Col". Arm- 
strong. 

For Command immediately L\ Col". Armstrong & Major 
Harleston, vide Detail. The Command to be supplied with 
one day's provisions. 

Extract from Gen'. Orders. 

Head Quarters Middlebrook 
20th Mar. 1779. 

The following Extract of a resolve of Congress is to be 
strictly observed in future, by all officers of the Line & 
Staff- 
In Congress March 5*" 1779 

Whereas it will be necessary that in future Certificates 
be more formally authenticated, to prevent many Incon- 
veniences that may arise similar to those already experi- 
enced — Resolved, that certificates hereafter given by Com- 
missioned Officers for Articles received for the use of the 
Army, be signed with their names at full length & the Rank 
they hold, & if under a Gen', Officer that the regiment to 
which they belong be added. 

That the particular Articles received be inserted in the 
Body of the Certificate, their Values, the time when, and 
the place where received in Letters, not in figures. 

That the Certificates be directed to the principal of the 
Department whose Duty it is to provide the Articles so 
received, or his nearest Deputy; separate Certificates to be 
given, whenever the Articles appertain to different De- 
partments. 

That Officers keep exact Copies of the Certificates they 
give, & transmit other Copies to the nearest Deputy or 



132 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Agent in the Department, giving him the necessary Infor- 
mation respecting the Business. 

That the Deputies transmit Copies of all the Certificates 
they pay, to the Principals, that Enquiry may be made, 
whether the giving the Certificates was necessary for the 
Public Service, and whether the things received have been 
properly applied. 

Head Quarters, Camp Middle Brook 
24'" March 1779 

The honourable the Continental Congress have l3een 
pleased to pass the following Resolution — 

March 15'" 1779 

Resolved that all Warrant Officers on the Civil Staff of 
the Army be put on the same footing with Commissioned 
Officers in respect to Arrests, Trials and punishments. 
A : O : 

The Army is to march tomorrow Morning at Six oClock ; 
the reveillee will beat at four & the Assembly at half-past 
five, at which time the Tents will be struck & the necessary 
Baggage put into the Waggons. Each regiment will leave 
a sufficient Guard for the protection of that part of the 
Baggage which will be left behind. The Soldiers are to 
carry their Blankets & Knapsacks. 

The Flying Hospitals will remain on the ground. 

The Army Marches by the Right 

Jarratts Ferry 6th May 1779 
6: Parole Danbuiy; C. S. Dart. Death. 
F : O. for the day tomorrow. Major Wise. 
B : M. Cap*. Ladson 

7: Parole Worcester; C. S. Ward. Watch. 
F : O : for the day tomorrow Major Armstrong. 
B: M. Cap'. Rayford 

8: Parole. Effingham. C. S. Elbert: Eaton. 
F : O : for the Day tomorrow — Major Eaton. 
B: M. Cap'. Lowry. 

(To be continued.) 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES SANTEE. 



1 758- 1 788. 



Copied by Mabel L. Webber. 

This register is the one kept by the Rev. Samuel Fenner 
Warren, during his rectorship, and so far as is known, is 
the only early register of this parish now in existance. It 
was kept in two folio leather bound volumes, marriages in 
one, births, christenings and deaths in the other. 

It is interesting to note that all the signatures in this reg- 
ister are original, and the register was kept by Rev. Mr. 
Warren himself. 

A full account of this parish, and a sketch of the life and 
services of Rev. S. F. Warren, may be found in Dalcho; 
copies of such inscriptions as remain in the churchyard may 
be found in this Magaaine, volume XII, page 153. 

A few modem entries in this Register were made from 
about 1850, and since then it has been regularly used. 

We are indebted to the present Vestry for the privilege 
of printing. 

Marriages 

1. Nathaniel M'Cormick of the Parish of Prince Frederick, 
Widower, and Mary Spencer of this Parish, Spinster, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of James Anderson 
of this Parish, by Licence, this Twenty Eighth Day of 
December, in the year of our Lord 1758. By me S. F. 
Warren. Minister of this Parish. This marriage was 
solemnized between us, Nathaniel M'^Cormick, Mary 
Spencer, In the presence of Michael Cockran, Rebecca 
Sullivan X her mark. 

2. Michael Cockran of this Parish, Widower and Rebecca 
Sullivan of this Parish, Spinster, were married in the 
Dwelling-house of Thos. Spencer Sen\ of this Parish, by 



134 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Licence, this Eleventh Day of January, in the year of our 
Lord, 1759. By me S. F: Warren Minister. 

This marriage was \ Michal Cockran 

Solemnized between us J Rebecca Sullivan X her mark 

In the Presence of W". Roberts. 

Stephen Sullivan 

3. Daniel Jaudon of this Parish, Bachelor and Anne Du- 
bosque of this Parish, Spinster were married in the 
Dwelling house of Isaac Rembert Sen', of this Parish, 
by Licence, this Thirty first Day of May in the year of 
our Lord 1759. By me S. F: Warren Minister 

This marriage was 1 Daniel Jaudon 

Solemnized between us J Anne Dubosque X her mark 
In the Presence of Isaac Rembert 
Paul Jaudon. 

4. Nicholas Bryan of the Parish of Prince George, Bach- 
elor and Mary Williams of the Parish of Prince George, 
Spinster were married in the Dwelling-house of Dan'l 
Horry Esq', of this Parish, by Licence, this ninth Day 
of June in the year of our Lord, 1759. By me S. F. 
Warren Minister 

This marriage was "1 Nicholas Bryan X his mark 

Solemnized between us J Mary Williams X her mark. 
In the Presence of Michael M'karty X his mark 
Jane M'karty X her mark 

5. Daniel Dupree of the Parish of Prince Frederick Bach- 
elor & Mary Normand of this Parish, Widow, were 
married in the Dwelling House of Mary Nonnand afore- 
said of this Parish, by Licence, this Twenty Eighth Day 
of June in y' year of our Lord 1759 by me, S. F. ^^^ar- 
ren. Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was )^ Daniel Dupre 

Solemnized between us j Mary Normand 
In the Presence of Frances Des Champs S'. 
Peter Mouzon. 

6. Archibald M'Clelland of this Parish Bachelor & Esther 
Des Champes of this Parish Spinster were married in 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES SANTEE 135 

the Dwelling-house of Francis Des Champes Sen', of 
this Parish, by Licence, this Third Day of July in the 
year of our Lord, 1759, by me S. F. Warren Rector of 
this Parish. 
This marriage was 1 Archibald McClellan 

Solemnized between us J Esther Des Champes 
In the Presence of Franc'. Des Champes S'. 
Paul Jaudon 



7. John Horry of the Parish of Prince George Widow', 
and Ann Royer of this Parish, widow, were married in 
the Dwelling-house of John Mayrant Esq', of this Par- 
ish, by Licence this Fifth Day of July in the year of our 
Lord, 1759, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was "1 John Horry 

Solemnized between us J Anne Royer 
In the Presence of Elias Horry 

Elizabeth Perdreau. 

8. Samuel Fenner Warren Rector of St James Santee, 
Bachelor & Elizabeth Perdreau of this Parish, Spinster 
were married in the Dwelling-house of Daniel Horry 
Esqr, of this Parish, by Licence, this Nineteenth Day of 
July in the year of our Lord 1759, by me Alexander 
Keith, Rector of S'. Stephens Santee. 

This marriage was 1 Samuel Fenner Warren 

Solemnized between us J Elizabeth Perdreau 
In the Presence of Daniel Horry Sen'. 
Judith Serre. 
Franc'. Des Champes Register of this Parish 

9. Peter Deschampes of this Parish, Bachelor and Eliza- 
beth Simmons of this Parish Spinster were married in the 
Dwelling house of George Simmons of this Parish, by 
Licence this Second Day of August in the year of our 
Lord 1759 by me S. F. Warren, Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was 1 Peter Deshamps 

Solemnized between us f Elizabeth Simmons 
In the Presence of Peter Mouzon. 

10. Joseph Palmer of the Parish of St. Stephens Widower 



136 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

and Catherine Thomas of this Parish Spinster, were 
married in the Dwelhng-house of Isaac Rembert Sen', of 
this Parish, by Licence this Eight Day of November in 
the year of our Lord 1759 by me Alex'. Keith Rector of 
St. Stephens. 
This marriage was ) Joseph Pahner 

Solemnized between us J Catherine Thomas 
In the Presence of John Barnett 

Judith Rembert 

11. Daniel Horry of this Parish Junior, Bachelor and 
Judith Serre of this Parish, Spinster, were married in 
the Dwelling-house of Daniel Horry Esqr. of this parish 
by Licence this Ninth Day of December in the year of 
our Lord, 1759, by me S. F. Warren Rector of this 
Parish. 

This marriage was ) Daniel Horry Junior 

Solemnized between us j Judith Serre 
In the Presence of John Dutarque Jun'. 
Elias Horry 

12. Joseph Anderson of this Parish, Bachelor, and Eliza- 
beth Fitch of this Parish, Spinster, were married in the 
Dwelling-house of James Anderson of this Parish, by 
Licence this Twenty-first Day of February in the year 
of our Lord 1760, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of this 
Parish 

This marriage was 1 Jos. Anderson 

Solemnized between us J Elizabeth Fitch 
In the Presence of Edward Jerman 

Thos. Spencer Jun'. 

13. James Axson of this Parish Bachelor and Esther 
Champanare of this Parish Spinster were married in the 
Dwelling house of S. F. Warren of this Parish, Clerk, 
by Banns, this Third Day of June, in the year of our 
Lord, 1760 by me, S. F. Warren Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was 1 James Axson 

Solemnized between us j Esther Champanare 
In the Presence of Thos. Wilson 

Andrew Rembert. 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES SANTEE 137 

14. John Cummings of this Parish, Bachelor and Ann 
Dutart of this Parish, Spinster were married in the 
Dwelling house of S. F. Warren of this Parish, Clerk, 
by Banns, this Thirteenth day of Oct^ in the year of our 
Lord, 1760, by me, S. F. Warren Rector 

This marriage was I John Cummings 

Solemnized between us j Ann Dutart 
In the Presence of BenJ" Perdriau 
Michael Boineau. 

15. Robert Minors of Prince-Georges Parish — Bachelor 
and Elizabeth Nicholose of said Parish Spinster were 
married in the Dwelling House of S. F. Warren of this 
Parish, Clerk, By License this Thirteenth day of Novem- 
ber, in the year of our Lord 1760, by me, S. F. Warren, 
Rector. 

This marriage was 1 Robert Minors 

Solemnized between us J Elizabeth Nicholase. 
In the Presence of Benj*. Perdriau 
Lydia Perdriau 

16. Stephen Ford of the Parish of St. Bartholomew Bach- 
elor, and Sarah Barton of the Parish of Prince Frederick 
Spinster were married in the Dwelling-house of S. F. 
Warren, of this Parish, Clerk. By Licence this Twenty 
fifth day of January in y' year of our Lord 1761, by me 
S. F. Warren, Rector. 

This marriage was 1 Stephen Ford 

Solemnized between us J Sarah Barton 
In the Presence of Isaac Ford 

W [Illegible] 

17. John Mayers of the Parish of Prince-George, Bachelor 
and Ann Highback of the Plarish of Prince-George, 
Spinster, were married in the Dwelling-house of S. F. 
Warren of this Parish, Clerk, by Licence this Twenty 
first Day of February in the year of our Lord, 1761, by 
me S. F. Warren, Rector. 

This marriage was ^ John Mayers 

Solemnized between us J Ann Hey Back 
In the Presence of Alex. Miot 

Lydia Perdriau 



138 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

1 8. Pearcival Bring of the Parish of Prince-George, Bach- 
elor and Elizabeth Crook of the Parish of Prince-George 
Spinster, were married at the Dwelling-house of S. F. 
Warren of this Parish, Clerk, by Licence this Eighteenth 
Day of March in the year of our Lord 1761, by me S. F. 
Warren, Rector. 

This marriage was 1 Percival Dring 

Solemnized between us f Elizabeth Crook 
In the Presence of Georgis Mack Dowll 
Ann Mack Dowll 

19. William Chicken of this Parish Wid'. and Elizabeth 
Chovin of this Parish, Widow, were married in the 
Dwelling-house of James Roberts of this Parish, by 
Licence this Fourteenth Day of May in the year of our 
Lord 1 76 1, by me S. F. Warren, Rector. 

This marriage was ] Will™. Chicken 

Solemnized between us f Eliz. Chovin 

In the Presence of James Roberts 

John De Lesseline 

20. Peter Herries of the Parish of Prince George, Wid'. 
and Mary Cains of the Parish of Prince George, widow, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of S. F. Warren of 
this Parish, Clerk, by Licence, this Fourth Day of June 
in the year of our Lord 1761, by me S. F. Warren Rector. 

This marriage was "1 Peter X Herries his mark 

Solemnized between us f Mary Cains 
In the Presence of John Cains 

Eliz : Warren. 

21. Elias Lewis of this Parish, Bachelor and Mary Logan 
of this Parish Widow, were married in this Parish 
Church, by Banns, this Twenty-ninth Day of July, in the 
year of our Lord, 1761, by me S. F. Warren. Rector of 
this Parish. 

This marriage was 1 Elias Lewis 

Solemnized between us J Mary Logan X her mark 

In the Presence of J. Lewis 

Martha Dumav. 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES SANTEE 139 

22. Thomas Spencer of this Parish, Bachelor and Susannah 
Money of the Parish of Prince George, Spinster Avere 
married in the Dwelling-house of James Anderson of 
this Parish, by Licence this Eight Day of October in the 
year of our Lord 1761, by me S. F. Warren Rector of 
this Parish. 

This marriage was "I Thos. Spencer 

Solemnized between us J Susanna Money 
In the Presence of Daniel McGregor 
Stephen Sullivan 

23. Henry Dexter of the Parish of Prince George Bachelor, 
and Ciceley Baldy, of this Parish, Spinster, were mar- 
ried in the Dwelling-house of Dan'l Horry Sen'. Esq', 
of this Parish, by Licence, this Nineteenth Day of No- 
vember in the year of our Lord, 1761, by me S. F. War- 
ren, Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was 1 Henry Dexter 

Solemnized between us J Cicely Baldy 
In the Presence of Paul Jaudon 

Dan". Horry Junior 

24. Jacob Bonhoste of the Parish of S* John Wid'. & 
Judith Barnard of this Parish spinster, were married at 
the Plantation of John-Coming Ball of this Parish, by 
Banns, this Twenty-Sixth Day of November in the year 
of our Lord, 1761. By me S. F. Warren, Rector of this 
Parish. 

This marriage was "1 Jacob Bonhoste 

Solemnized between us J Judith Bernard 
In the Presence of John Gaillard 
John Barnett 

25. James Barnard [missing] Bachelor and Esther Jaudon 
of this Parish Spinster, were married in the Dwelling- 
house of Paul Jaudon of this Parish, by Licence, this 
Third Day of December in the year of Lord [sic] 1761, 
by me S. F. Warren Rector of this Parish 

This marriage was \ James Brenerd [sic] 

Solemnized between us f Esther Jaudon 
In the Presence of Elizabeth Robert 

Esther Chovin. 



140 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

26. John Bone of the Parish of Prince George Bachelor & 
Elizabeth Jordan of the Parish of Prince George, Spins- 
ter, were married in the Dwelling-house of Christopher 
Jordan, of the Parish of Prince George, by Licence, this 
Nineteenth Day of January in the year of our Lord 1762, 
by me S. F. Warren, Rector of St. James Santee. 

This marriage was 1 John Bone 

Solemnized between us [ Elizabeth Jerdan 

In the Presence of Ch'. Jordan 
Jn". Jordan. 

2'j. Daniel M'Gregor of this Parish Bachelor, and Phebe 
Smith of this Parish, Spinster, were married in the 
Dwelling-house of Jonah Collins of this Parish, by 
Licence this Twenty-fifth Day of March in the year of 
our Lord 1761 by me S. F. Warren Rector of this Par- 
ish. 

This marriage was 1 Daniel M'Gregor 

Solemnized between us J Phebe Smith 

In the Presence of Jonah Atchison 
Stephen Sullivan 

28. Noah Thomas of this Parish, Bachelor and Catherine 
Chicken of this Parish, Spinster were married in this 
Parish Church, by Licence this Fifth Day of August, 
in the year of our Lord, 1762, by me, S. F. Warren Rec- 
tor of this Parish. 

This marriage was 1 Noah Thomas N T his mark 

Solemnized between us J Catherine Chicken 
In the Presence of Peter Guerry 

Elizabeth Dupont. 

29. John Barnett [missing] Bachelor, and Ann Bochett of 
this Parish, Spinster were married in the Dwelling-house 
of Henry Bochett of this Parish, by Licence, this Second 
Day of December, in the year of our Lord 1762, by me, 
S. F. Warren Rector of this Parish 

This marriage was 1 Joh". Barnett 

Solemnized between us J Ann Bochett. 
In the Presence of John Jennes 

Judith Rembert. 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES SANTEE 141 

30. Job Marion of the Parish of St. John Wid'. and Eliza- 
beth Gaillard of this Parish, Spinster were married in the 
DwelHng-house of Theodore Gaillard of this Parish, 
Sen'., by Licence, this Fourteenth Day of December, in 
the year of our Lord 1762, by me S. F. Warren, Rect' of 
this Parish. 

This marriage was 1 Job. Marion 

Solemnized between us J Elizabeth Gaillard 
In the Presence of Catherine Gaillard 
Fran\ Marion* 

31. Stephen Sullivan of this Parish Bachelor and Elizabeth 
M'Gregor of this Parish, Spinster, were married in this 
Parish Church, by Licence, this Twenty-Third Day of 
December, in the year of our Lord 1762, by me S. F. 
Warren, Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was 1 Stephen Sullivan 

Solemnized between us J Elezebeth Mcgregor 

In the Presence of Michael Cockran 
Barth''. Gaillard 

;i,2. Robert Croft of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Bach- 
elor, and Ann Jenkins of this Parish Spinster, were mar- 
ried in the Dwelling house of Thomas Boone of the 
Parish of Prince Frederick, by Licence, this Twenty- 
Fourth day of March, in y' Year of our Lord 1763, by 
me S. F. Warren, Rect'. of this Parish. 

This marriage was 1 Rob'. Croft. 

Solemnized between us f Ann Jenkins 

In the Presence of Tho'. Boone 

Elizabeth Boone. 

T)T^. David Fogartie of this Parish, Widower and Mary 
Perdriau of this Parish, widow, were married at the 
Plantation of John Dutarque Jun'. of this Parish, by 
Banns, this Twelth Day of June, in the year of our Lord 
1763, by me, S. F. Warren, Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was ^ D. Fogartie 

Solemnized between us J Mary Perdriau X her mark 

In the Presence of Joseph Fogartie 
Stephen Fogartie. 

*Gen. Francis Marion; Job Marion was his brother, and mar- 
ried first, Elizabeth St. Julien. 



142 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

34. James Gaillard of this Parish, Bachelor, and Mary 
Jones of this Parish widow, were married at the Dwell- 
ing house of Sam'l Fenner Warren, Clerk, of this Parish 
by Licence this Nineteenth Day of July, in the Year of 
our Lord, 1763, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of this 
Parish. 

This marriage was "1 James Gaillard 

Solemnized between us J Mary Jones 
Li the Presence of Allen Mackee 
W". Jones. 

35. Robert Jordan of the Parish of Prince George, Bach- 
elor, and Martha Murrill of the Parish of Prince George 
Spinster, were married at the Plantation of John Marant 
Esq', of this Parish by Licence this Eighteenth Day of 
September, in the year of our Lord 1763. 

This marriage was 1 R'. Jordan. 

Solemnized between us J Marth Murrill 

In the Presence of W". Bell 

Mary Smith 

36. Alexander Miot of this Parish, Bachelor and Rachel 
Fitch of this Parish, Spinster, were married at the Plan- 
tation of Jean-Elizabeth Dumay of this Parish, widow, 
by Licence, this Twenty-Second Day of December, in the 
year of our Lord 1763, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of 
this Parish. 

This marriage was 1 Alex'. Miote 

Solemnized between us J Rachel Fitch 
In the Presence of Peter Dumay 
James Bell. 

^y. James Bell of this Parish, Bachelor and Jean Anderson 
of this Parish, Spinster, were married at the Dwelling- 
house of Jean-Elizabeth Dumay of this Parish, Widow, 
by Licence, This Fourteenth Day of February in y' Year 
of our Lord, 1764, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of this 
Parish. 

This marriage is 1 James Bell 

Solemnized between us j Jane Anderson 

In the Presence of Jonah Atchinson 
Joseph Bell. 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES SANTEE 143 

38. John Dutart of this Parish, Bachelor and Mary Boineau 
of this Parish, Spinster, were married in the DweUing- 
house of Mich'l Boineau of this Parish Widow\, by- 
Licence, this First day of March, in the year of our Lord 
1764 by me S. F. Warren, Rector of this Parish 

This marriage was 1 John Dutart 

Solemnized between us J Mary Boineau 
In the Presence of James Rembeit 
Judith Rembert. 

39. James Halsey of this Parish, Widower and Frances 
Grant of this Parish, Widow, were married in the Dwell- 
ing-house of Frances Grant aforesaid, of this Parish, by 
Licence, this Twelfth Day of July in the Year of our 
Lord 1764, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was "I Ja'. Halsey 

Solemnized between us J Frances Grant 

In the Presence of John Barnett 

Stephen Sullivan 

40. William Walker of the Parish of Prince Frederick — 
Widower, and Judith Rembert of this Parish, Spinster, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of Isaac Rembert of 
this Parish, by Licence, this Sixteenth Day of August in 
the Year of our Lord 1764, by me, S. F. Warren, Rector 
of this Parish. 

This marriage was ^ Will"'. Walker 

Solemnized between us J Judith Rembert. 
In the Presence of Michael Boineau 

E'^ Madalen Boineau. 

(To be continued) 



HISTORICAL NOTES. 

THE DESIGNER AND BUILDER OF THE MILES BREWTON HOUSE. 

The following newspaper notice gives the names of the 
men concerned in the designing and building of the Brew- 
ton house, now best known as the Pringle house, situated 
in King Street, this City. 

A portfolio of twenty changing drawings of this famous 
old house has recently been published for the artist, Miss 
Alice R. Huger Smith of this City, to which Mr. D. E. 
Huger Smith contributed an accurate and interesting his- 
torical preface, which however, does not include the item re- 
ferred to. 

ARCHITECTURE 

Ut res gesta est Narrabe Ordine 

Ezra Waite, Civil Architect, House-builder in general, and 
Carver, from London, Has finished the Architecture, conducted 
the execution thereof, viz: in the joiner way, all tabernacle frames, 
(but that in the dining-room excepted) and carved all the said 
work in the four principal rooms; and also calculated, adjusted, 
and draw'd at large for to work by, the lonick entablature, and 
carved the same in the front and round the eaves, of Miles Brew- 
ton, Esquire's House on White-Point for Mr. Moncrieff. — If on 
inspection of the above mentioned work, and twenty-seven years 
experience, both in theory and practice, in noblemen and gentle- 
men's seats, be sufficient to recommend; he flatters himself to give 
satisfaction to any gentleman, either by plans, sections, elevations, 
or executions, at his house in King-Street, next door to Mr. 
Wainwright's, where architecture is taught by a peculiar method 
never published in any book extant. 

N. B. As Miles Brewton Esquire's dining room is of a new 
construction with respect to the finishing of windows and door- 
ways, it has been industriously propagated by some, (believed to 
be Mr. Kinsey Burden, a carpenter) that the said Waite did not 
do the architecture, and conduct the execution thereof. There- 
fore the said Waite, begs leave to do himself justice in this public 
manner, and assure all gentlemen, that he the said Waite, did 
construct every individual part and drawed the same at large for 
the joiners to work by, and conducted the execution thereof. Any 
man that can prove to the contrary, the said Waite promises to 
pay him One Hundred Guineas, as witness my hand, this 22d day 
of August, 1769 

Ezra Waite. 
Veritas Odium pavit. 

(South Carolina Gazette and Country Journal, August 
22, 1769.) 



HISTORICAL NOTES 145 

That the "Mr. Moncrief" mentioned above, was a master 
builder or carpenter, is apparently shown by a section of 
Gov. Glenn's message to the Commons House in July, 1748, 
concerning the repair of the free school. 

"... Mr. Moncrief, The Carpenter, informs me 
. . . " [of the expence &c.] (South Carolhm Gazette, 
July 9, 1748). 

An account of the Brewton family is to be found in this 
Magazine, vol. II, p. 128. 

A coRDES-MARiON DEED. — The Original of the following 
deed is owned by Mr. W. Redwood Wright, of Philadel- 
phia, a member of this Society, who has kindly allowed it 
to be copied and printed. 

The Esther Marion of the deed was the mother of Gen- 
eral Francis Marion, the trustee, Thomas Cordes was her 
brother; Daniel Huger married her niece, Man,- Cordes, 
daughter of Isaac; William Keith was the husband of Ann 
Cordes, another daughter of Isaac; John was the son of 
Isaac and Ester Cordes, a daughter of Isaac by his first 
marriage with Joan Travours. (See Transactions of the 
Huguenot Society of S. C, No. 13, p. 88.) 

To all whom it may Concern Know yee that we Daniel 
Huger John Cordes William Keith and Esther Cordes of 
S*. Johns Parish Berkly County in the province aforesaid 
planters for Divers Good Causes and valuable Considera- 
tions thereunto moving have Given and Granted and by 
these presents do give Grant and Confirm unto Thomas 
Cordes In behalf of and in Trust for Esther Marion the 
wife of Gabriel Marion and the heirs of her Body the fol- 
lowing Slaves named June a boy Willobey a wench Peter a 
Boy to gather with their Increase for the Sole and proper 
use and in Behalf of the said Esther Marion her heirs 
Exors and Administrators from henceforth for her or their 
Sole and proper use therewith to do Order and Dispose of 



146 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

as their own proper Goods and Chatties as to him the said 
Trustee may seem most Conducive to the Interest of the said 
Esther Marion her heirs &c. and we the said Daniel Huger 
John Cordes William Keith and Esther Cordes the said 
Slaves to the said Trustee in Behalf as aforesaid togather 
with their Increase will from all & Each and Every of their 
heirs AVarrant and Defend them to the use, Benifit and Be- 
hoof of Such Child or Children of the said Esther by the 
said Gabriel Marion and for such term and time as the said 
Esther by her Last will and Testament made in the pres- 
ence of two or more Creditable Witnesses Shall Limitt 
Direct give or order the same and the said Esther Marion 
for herself her Exors and Admors doth Covenant promis 
Grant and agree to and with the said Thomas Cordes and 
the Survivors of him and to and with such Trustees as 
shall be appointed by the said Esther from time to time 
that it shall and may be Law full to and for the said Esther 
Marion his wife notwithstanding her Coverture to make 
her Last will and Testament in writing and therein and 
thereby to give Direct Limitt and appoint the above Granted 
and assigned premises or any part or Parcell thereof as 
she shall think proper to such Child or Children of the said 
Esther b}^ the said Gabriel and to and for such uses intents 
and purposes and with and Under Such restrictions and 
Limitations as She shall direct and that all and every Such 
Child and Children to whom the same shall be so Given 
Limitted or Direct by the said Esther Marion shall and may 
hold and Enjoy the Same without the hinderance or 
Denial Claim or Demand of the said Gabriel Marion 
his Exors admors or assigns or any other Person 
or persons Lawfuly Claiming or to Claim by from 
or under him them or any of them And Lastly that it 
Shall and may be Law full to and for the said Esther Mar- 
ion upon the Death of him the said Thomas Cordes to name 
and Appoint in Writing under hand and Seal one or more 
Trustees in the Room of him so Dying and so in Case of 
the Death of such new Named Trustees as often as it hap- 
pen which said Trustee shall have the same power and au- 



HISTORICAL NOTES 147 

thority in regard to the Premises as if they had Been 
Originally named in this Deed of Trust. 

In Winess where of the said Parties to these presents 
have hereunto Interchangably Sett their hands and Seals 
the i8"\ of March 1746/7. 

[Signed] 
Witnesses Daniel Huger Seal 

Gabriel Marion jun'. Jn°. Cordes Seal 

Tho'. Cordes Jun". Will Keith Seal 

Easter Cordes Seal 

[On back] 

Memorandum this Instrument of Writing was duly 
proved by Gabriel Marion Jun'. this 24th March 1746/7 
before me 

Tho Monck. 



LIST OF PUBLICATIONS 

OF THE 

SOUTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 

COLLECTIONS. 

Vol. L, 1857, $3.00; Vol IL, 1858, $3.00; Vol. III., 
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$4.00; Vol. v., 1897, paper, $3.00. 

PAMPHLETS. 

Journal of a Voyage to Charlestown in So. Caro- 
lina by Pelatiah Webster in 1765. Edited by Prof. T. 
P. Harrison, 1898. 75c. 

The History of the Santee Canal. By Prof. F. A. 
Porcher. With an Appendix by A. S. Salley, Jr., 1903. 

75c. 

THE SOUTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL AND 
GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE. 

Volume I, 1900, Edited by A. S. Salley, Jr. Complete 

Volume. $10.00 

Single copies of Nos. 2-4, $1.25 each. 

Volume II to IX, 1901-1908, Edited by A. S. Salley, Jr. 

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Members get a discount of 25 per cent, on the above 

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Address: South Carolina Historical Society, 

Charleston, S. C. 



i 



THE 
SOUTH CAROLINA 

HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 
MAGAZINE 




PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY THE 

SOUTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



VOLUME XV.. NO- 4, 



OCTOBER, 1914. 



Entered at the Post-office at Charleston, S. C, an 
Second-Class Matter. 



Phintso for the Society by 

WALKER, EVANS A C O G S W E L U CO. 

Charleston, S. C. 

1914 



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE. 

Joseph W. Barnwell, Henry A. M. Smith, 

A. S. Salley, Jr. 

EDITOR OF THE MAGAZINE. 
Mabel L. Webber. 



CONTENTS. 

The Baronies of South Carolina 149 

Order Book of John Faucherard Grimke 166 

Broughton Letters 171 

Parish Register of St. James Santee 197 

Index 204 



N. B. — These Magazines, with the exception of No. i 
of Vol. I, are $1.25 to any one other than a member of the 
South Carolina Historical Society. Members of the So- 
ciety receive them free. The Membership fee is $4.00 per 
annum (the fiscal year being from January to January), 
and members can buy back numbers or duplicates at $1.00 
each. In addition to receiving the Magazines, members are 
allowed a discount of 25 per cent, on all other publications 
of the Society, and have the free use of the Society's library. 

Any member who has not received the last number 
will please notify the Secretary and Treasurer, 

Miss Mabel L. Webber, 

South Carolina Historical Society, 

Charleston, S. C. 



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE. 

Joseph W. Barnwell, Henry A. M. Smith, 

A. S. Salley, Jr. 

EDITOR OF THE MAGAZINE. 
Mabel L. Webber. 



CONTENTS. 

The Baronies of South Carolina - 149 

Order Book of John Faucherard Grimke 166 

Broughton Letters 171 

Parish Register of St, James Santee 197 

Index 204 



N, B. — These Magazines, with the exception of No. i 
of Vol. I, are $1.25 to any one other than a member of the 
South Carolina Historical Society. Members of the So- 
ciety receive them free. The Membership fee is $4.00 per 
annum (the fiscal year being from January to January), 
and members can buy back numbers or duplicates at $1.00 
each. In addition to receiving the Magazines, members are 
allowed a discount of 25 per cent, on ail other publications 
of the Society, and have the free use of the Society's library. 

Any member who has not received the last number 
will please notify the Secretary and Treasurer, 

Miss Mabel L. Webber, 

South Carolina Historical Society, 

Charleston, S. C. 




■iamtjrave. .feftUyi 3arai-i/ 

iLtt.it (^ 
5e.lt l« Cluini p Jn-'l- 



^ •IjHjL.Jm.M jiiUM^'-,'^ Q'jf"^^ 



The South Carolina 

Historical and Genealogical 

Magazine. 

VOL. XV. October, 1914. No. 4 

THE BARONIES OF SOUTH CAROLINA. 
By Henry A. M. Smith. 



XV. 

LANDGRAVE KETELBY'S BARONY. 

At a meeting of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina 
held 10 February 1708 /9 it was ordered that Abel 
Ketelby Esq" of the Middle Temple be made a Land- 
grave of Carolina;^ and on March 10*^'' following it was 
ordered that M"". Ketelby pay £20. for the purchase 
money of each 1000 acres and 10 shillings yearly as 
quit rent for each thousand. The surveyor to set out 
for him 5,000 acres of land.^ This was paid on 24^ 
March 1709,^ and on the same day his patent as Land- 
grave was issued;^ and on the same day a letter was 
written by the Lords Proprietors to the Governor of 
South Carolina that Landgrave Abel Ketelby had 
purchased 5000 acres which was to be admeasured 
out to him.^ 

Landgrave Ketelby was evidently a barrister at law 
and in some connection with the Proprietors. He was 

iCoUect'n Hist: Soc: of S. C, vol. I, p. 177. 

2Ibid, p. 178. 

3Ibid. 

4Ibid, p. 155. 

SIbid, p. 154. 



150 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

one of the witnesses to the will of Governor Edward 
Tynte executed 19 July 1709 when the latter was about 
to take a "speedy voyage" to Carolina of which he 
had just been appointed Governor.^ By an Act of 
the General Assembly of the Province passed 12 Deer. 
1712 Landgrave Ketelby (in the Act styled "Hon: 
Landgrave Abell Kethelby") was appointed "Public 
"Agent for soliciting the affairs of this Province before 
"the Parliament of Great Britain, the Right Honorable 
"the Lords and Proprietors of this Province." He was 
to obtain a continuance of the bounty on naval stores 
imported into England and to obtain permission for 
the Province to export rice and naval stores direct to 
the south of Europe, Africa, the West India Islands, 
and other places in America. He was to be paid £150. 
currency of Carolina as an encouragement to undertake 
the agency, £150. more when Parliament passed an 
Act continuing the bounty and £500. when it passed 
an Act allowing the free direct exportation of rice and 
naval stores to the places mentioned.^ 

Two years later by act passed 18 Deer 17 14 his com- 
pensation was made £200. currency annually. In this 
last Act he is styled "Honorable Landgrave Abel 
Kettleby of the Middle Temple" He continued to act 
as agent of the Province until 16^ December 1716 
when he ceased to be agent. ^ In June 1717 he with 
Sir Robert Montgomery submitted to the Proprietors 
proposals for settling a tract of land between the Ala- 
tamaha and Savannah rivers to be called Azelia^ 

These proposals were accepted and culminated in 
the grant in 1717 to Sir Robert Montgomery of the 
"Margravate of Azilia" covering the territory between 
the Savannah and the Altamaha and including the 
"Golden Islands" of St Symon, Sapella, St Catarina, 
and Ogeche. 

On 23 July 1711 a grant was issued to Landgrave 
Abel Ketelby for 1680 acres on the southwest side of 

6S. C. Hist: & Geneal: Mag: vol. XIII, p. 87. 
7Statutes of S. C, vol. II, p. 600. 
sCollections Hist: Soc: of S. C, vol. I, p. 229. 
9Ibid, p. 189. 



THE BARONIES OF SOUTH CAROLINA 151 

Ashley river bounding Northeast on M"". Jno Stevens 
Southeast on Landgrave Edward Jukes South West on 
WilHam ElHott and Northwest on Capt. Peter Slann 
Thomas Waring and William Elliott^'' On 20 February 
1712/13 a second grant was issued to him for 1026 
acres adjoining the first grant on the Northwest. ^^ These 
two grants aggregating 2706 acres are all the grants 
the writer has found on the record as issued to Land- 
grave Ketelby. 

As has been stated he had purchased 5000 acres 
and his patent as Landgrave should have entitled him 
to 48000 acres which may have been set out to him 
elsewhere but the writer of this article has found no 
reference on the record to any other grants or land 
owned by him. 

On the 16 Deer 1716 he was by the assembly discharged 
from his post as agent in England. ^^ He seems to have 
kept up connection with the Provincial authorities for 
Francis Nicholson the first Royal Governor of South 
CaroHna (1721-1724) by his will dated 4 March 1726/27 
appoints his "Honored Friend Landgrave Abel Ketelby" 
overseer and trustee of his estate. There apparently 
was some connection between them (possibly only 
friendship) for Governor Nicholson bequeathes mourn- 
ing rings of a guinea each to Landgrave Abel Ketelby 
and wife, Robert Ketelby Esq and wife and son Abel 
Ketelby junior; and to Abel Ketelby junior his godson 
his silver fringed gloves and silver handled sword. ^' 

There is no evidence that Landgrave Ketelby ever 
came out to the Province or reclaimed and settled on 
his grants. On 9*^^ May 1735 he conveyed the whole 
contents of the two grants to Samuel Wragg.^* This 
ended his connection with his so called "Barony." In 
the old maps and some of the boundaries given in old 
deeds the land is described as of "Counsellor Ketelby" 
no doubt from the circumstance that he was a barrister 

lOOff: Historical Commn vol. 1710-1715, pp. 253-254. 
nibid, pp. 254, 256. 

12 Collections Hist: Soc: of S. C, vol. I, p. 229. 
13S. C. Hist: & Geneal: Mag:, vol. V, p. 222. 
14M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. B, No. 3, p. 135. 



152 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

and in some sort apparently a legal adviser of the 
Proprietors as he was also the agent of the Provincial 
Assembly. It was not a '"Barony" in the definition 
of that term in the Fundamental Constitutions as it 
did not contain 12,000 acres. 

On the 10'^'' June 1736 Samuel Wragg conveyed the 
Northeastern part of the tract to Ralph Izard. ^^ This 
Ralph Izard was the eldest son of Ralph Izard the 
original immigrant of the name^^ On the death of 
Ralph Izard the land so acquired passed under his 
will to his eldest son Henry Izard. ^^ In the will it is 
described as 1353 acres called "Ketelby's" but in a 
memorial of Henry Izard dated 10 February 1743/4 
he describes it as containing 1482 acres the difi'erence 
being probably due to an excess ascertained on a re- 
survey or the addition of a small adjoining tract ap- 
parently purchased by Ralph Izard. From Henry 
Izard the property passed to his only son Ralph Izard^^ 
in whose hands it continued until his death in 1804. 
After his death the lands were disposed of and passed 
into other hands. Dm'ing the successive Izard owner- 
ships the tract was divided into two plantations "Wal- 
nut Hill" and "Round Savannah" the later including 
in addition to the purchase from Ketelby a small tract 
added from the Westo plantation and a small tract 
originally part of the Ashley Barony. 

From Samuel Wragg the unsold part of his purchase 
from Ketelby passed to his only son and heir at law 
William Wragg who on 27 Deer 1763 sold to Samuel 
Wainwright the southwest part of the tract containing 
762 acres^^ and on 3 Novr 1764 conveyed to Edward 
Perry the intervening tract of 720 acres between the 
parts conveyed to Ralph Izard and to Wainwright. ^"^ 

The piece sold to Edward Perry became known as 
"Poplar Hill" plantation. Edward Perry had as early 

isOfiF: Hist: Com'n Memo: Bk. 7, p. 417. 
16S. C. Hist: & Gen: Mag:, vol. II, p. 209. 
l7Prob: Ct: Charleston. Bk. 1740-1747, p. 144. 
18S. C. Hist: & Gen: Mag:, vol. II, p. 214. 
19M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. B, No. 3, p. 135. 
20Ibid, Bk. N, No. 3, p. 183. 



THE BARONIES OF SOUTH CAROLINA 153 

as 1742 acquired from William Ball 620 acres which had 
been granted to Bull 27 June 1910 with 147 acres granted 
15 February 1716/17^^ and from his purchases 
formed the three plantations known as "Mansion 
House" "Old House" and "Poplar Hill" and which 
continued in Edward Perry and his descendants until 
late in the 19^^ century. The 762 acres sold to Samuel 
Wain Wright he sold to James Saunders in 1762, 
who in 1773 conveyed to William Sanders who devised it 
to Lawrence Sanders who in 1789 devised it to Miss 
Ann Broughton who in 1801 conveyed it to Nicholas 
Cruger who in 1804 conveyed it to William Boone 
Mitchell in whose hands and those of his descendants 
it continued until long subsequent to the war of 1861- 
1865. 

To the North of the Ketelby grant lay the "Westo" 
plantation on Westo Savannah near the head of Ashley 
river which was granted on 8 Septr 1697^^ for 1000 acres 
to John Stevens of Dorchester who was closely con- 
nected with the original Dorchester settlement and the 
grantee of the lands afterwards subdivided among the 
Dorchester settlers. ^^ 

Under the Will of John Stevens the lands at Westo 
Savannah went to his son Samuel Stevens who with 
his brother John were directed by the Will to be brought 
up "at the CoUedge in New England to good lerning."^* 
Samuel Stevens afterwards apparently practiced medi- 
cine — at least he is known as "D"" Samuel Stevens 
and his tombstone is the oldest one in the graveyard of 
the old Congregational Church at Dorchester" On his 
death in 1760 the Westo plantation was by his execu- 
tors in 1762 sold to Henry Smith a son of the second 
Landgrave Thomas Smith and by Henry Smith was de- 
vised to his son Thomas Smith^'' in the hands of whose de- 
scendants it continued until the war of 1861-1865. 

2ilbid, Bk. F. F., p. 69. 

2 20ff; Secty of State, vol. 38, p. 337. 

23S. C. Hist: & Gen: Mag: vol. VI, pp. 71, 73. 

24Prob: Ct: Charleston, Bk. 1671-1727, p. 102. 

2SS. C. Hist: & Gen: Mag:, vol. VI, p. 93. 

2 6Prob: Ct: Charleston, Will Bk. A, p. 20. 



154 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

The name Westo Savannah seems to have come from 
the fact that the Savannah or swamp was a settlement 
or camping point of the Westo or Westoe Indians in 
their raids against the Indians on the coast. In the 
sermon preached in 1846 by the Rev. George Sheldon 
at the old Dorchester Congregational Church or "White 
Meeting" in commemoration of the 150*'' anniversary 
of the building of the church he states in a note (no 
doubt from the traditions and information given him 
by the congregation) that the Westoes "were in the 
"immediate vicinity— having a settlement and a bury- 
"ing ground on the plantation Westoe now owned by 
"G. H. Smith Ksq*^ where quantities of their bones are 
"often discovered." 

To the Northeast the Ketelby tract bounded on the 
seigniory known as St Giles or Ashley Barony laid out 
to the Earl of Shaftsbury an account of which has 
already been pubhshed in this Magazine," 

East, according to the grant, Ketelbys lands bounded 
on lands of John Cooper and I^andgrave Edward 
Juckes. The exact location of the lands of I^andgrave 
Juckes the writer has not been able to establish. The 
lands to the East came afterwards in the possession of 
Ralph Izard and Edward Perry. Edward Perry's land 
as has been stated hereinbefore was purchased from 
William Bull to whom it had been granted. Ralph 
Izard of "Burton"^^ or "Fair Spring" (a nephew of the 
Ralph Izard who purchased the Eastern part of the 
Ketelby tract) in 1749-1753 had purchased several 
tracts^^ adjoining his uncles lands to the East, of which 
he constituted one plantation to which the name "Cow 
Savannah" was given. Ninety- three acres of this 
formed part of a tract of about 500 acres at Cow 
Savannah which seems to have been originally granted 
to one Robert Johnson alias "Black Robin." This 
tract seems to have been in the hands of this Robert 
Johnson very early and the deeds of adjoining lands 

2 7S. C. Hist: & Gen: Mag:, vol. XI, p. 76. 

2 8lbid, vol. II, p. 233, 

29M. C. O. Charleston, Bks. N. N. 466. F. F. 237. 



THE BARONIES OF SOUTH CAROLINA 155 

always describe him as Robert Johnson alias "Black 
Robin." There is no grant now to be found on record as 
to him and there is nothing to show who he was. There 
was a Major Robert Johnson of Barbadoes who was 
a party to the original agreement of 7*^** January 1664 
whereby every party thereto paying or subscribing 
1000 pounds of sugar to the adventure for the settle- 
ment of the Province was to have 500 acres ;^'' and who 
paid in his 1000 pounds of sugar, and who apparently 
actually came out to the Province about 25 October 
1671.^^ The tract on Cow Savannah attributed accord- 
ing to the boundings to Robert Johnson alias Black 
Robin covered about 500 acres and it may be "Black 
Robin" was the same Major Robert Johnson party 
to the agreement of 1664. 

This tract was evidently run out very early and there 
was a conflict in the Hues with the lines at that point 
of Lord Shaftsbury's barony which seems to have been 
settled in favor of the Black Robin grant as the later 
titles recognize the lines of that tract. From Ralph 
Izard the Cow Savannah plantation passed to his son 
Ralph Izard who about 1775 purchased from Richard 
Bohun Baker a plantation of some 500 acres then or 
later known as the "Villa" plantation. 

The title thro' the Bakers back to the original grant 
of this 500 acres seems on the record to be based on 
grants to John Cooper and Charles Craven, but as 
near as approximately would appear this "Villa" 
plantation lies where from the boundaries and des- 
criptions it would appear was Landgrave Edward 
Juckes grant. 

Ralph Izard who purchased from Samuel Wragg the 
Northeastern part of the Ketelby grant, also acquired 
1040 acres lying on Cow Savannah and Jack Savanna 
South east of the "Cow Savannah" and "Villa" planta- 
tions, and separated from them by the public road 
from Bacons Bridge to Parkers Ferry called the Horse 
Savannah Road and the part of "Black Robin's" tract 

30Collections of the S. C. Hist: Soc:, vol. V, p. 30. 
3llbid, p. 254. 



156 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

known as "Goldings" and a tract owned by one Philip 
Evans or Evance. 

The tract thus acquired by Ralph Izard was com- 
posed of two grants, one of 640 acres granted 24 Sept"^ 
1710^2 and one of 400 acres granted 28 July 17lP^ 
both to Thomas Hepworth one time Chief Justice of 
the Province and were on 2 June 1731 by Charles Devon 
transferred to Ralph Izard^^ 

The tract of 1040 acres so purchased by Ralph Izard 
in 1731 continued intact until the death of his grandson 
Ralph Izard in 1804 when a portion was sold but a 
portion known as "Laurel Hill" continued in the hands 
of his daughter Georgina who married Joseph Allen 
Smith and at her death passed to her son Joseph Allen 
Smith (afterwards by a change of name the late Allen 
Smith Izard) and thro' devises with no transfer by sale 
now is owned by William E. Huger Esq' of Charleston. 

It will thus be seen that the two branches of the Izard 
family held in this section a large amount of land. The 
land was excellent land the plantations were what were 
known as inland rice plantations i. e. rice plantations 
not on tidal rivers but on vSwamps or Savannahs irri- 
gated by rainfall water stored in reservoirs or ponds 
formed by dikes or dams across the swamps and water 
courses. It was in this section that the legion of Lieut. 
Col. Henry Lee "Light Horse Harry" was posted when 
General Greene and the American army occupied the 
country around Charleston after the battle of Eutaw 
Springs. The laudatory terms in which he describes 
it are well known. 

"The first day's march brought these detachments 
"to the country settled by the original emigrants into 
"Carolina. The scene was both new and delightful. 
"Vestiges, though clouded by war, everywhere appeared 
"of the wealth and taste of the inhabitants. Spacious 
"edifices, rich and elegant gardens, with luxuriant and 
"extensive rice plantations, were to be seen on every 

3 2Secty. State's Office, Grants, vol. 39, p. 96. 

33Ibid, p. 154. 

340ff: Hist: Comm'n Memo:, Bk. 5, p. 255. 



THE BARONIES OF SOUTH CAROLINA 157 

"side * * * * during our con- 

"tinued marches and countermarches, never before had 
"we been solaced with the prospect of so much comfort. 
"Here we were not confined to one solitary mansion, 
"where a few, and a few only, might enjoy the charms 
"of taste and the luxury of opulence. "^^ 

The Legion was for a long time posted at the "Villa" 
plantation and it was from the Villa plantation that the 
legion moved on the last advance towards Charleston 
before its evacuation and took position before the post 
of the enemy at Schubricks (now the Country Club 
just above Magnolia Cemetery) whence under General 
Wayne they marched into Charleston upon its evacua- 
tion.^^ 

Since that period the whole economic system of the 
country has changed, and a more dreadful war has 
devastated the region and the traveller now through 
the places which Light Horse Harry Lee described 
with such exuberant admiration would find only ruins 
from which can be gathered no evidence of its former 
prosperity. He would find as Miss Louisa Carolina 
Colleton found in contemplating the ruins of her home 
at Fairlawn that "desolation brooded where plenty 
"formerly had revelled in her gayest mood." 

To the West of the Ketelby tract lay a plantation of 
some 500 acres which seems to have been granted 
originally to Peter Slan and then to have passed to 
Richard Waring in whose family it continued for many 
years and 400 acres of it was in 1818 sold as the property 
of Thomas Waring of Pine Hill to D*". Fabricius Perry 
and was then known by the name of "Clay Hill."^^ 

South of "Clay Hill" and also West of the Ketelby 
tract lay a plantation known as "Pinckney Plains" 
which was granted for 500 acres 28 June 1711 to Thomas 
Waring.^^ By Thomas Waring it was by conveyance 
made 1 April 1714 donated to Joseph Waring whose 

3SMemoirs of the War in the Southern Department — Ed: of 1870, 
p. 525. 

3 6Garden's Anecdotes, 1st series, p. 391. 

3 7M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. C, No. 10, p. 509. 

3 8Secy. State's Office, vol. 39, p. 109. 



158 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

executors on 11 July 1745 conveyed 483 acres of it to 
James Skirving^^ who on 8 April 1749 conveyed the 
483 acres to Charles Pinckney, who was in 1752-1753 
Chief Justice of the Province. By the latters will he 
devised it to his son Charles Cotesworth Pinckney 
who in 1824 gave it as a marriage portion to his daughter 
Eliza Lucas Pinckney on her marriage to Ralph Izard, 
son of the Ralph Izard who died in 1804, at his death 
the owner of the part of the Ketelby tract purchased 
in 1736 from Samuel Wragg^° In M'^ Izards hands 
and those of her devisees it continued until after 1880 
having so remained in the same family from 1749 to 
1880. 

West of "Pinckney Plains" lay a tract of 500 acres 
also granted to Thomas Waring on 28 June 171 1."*^ 
This place became known as "Pine Hill" and has con- 
tinued in the hands of descendants of Thomas Waring 
to the present day. One branch of that family the 
owners of the plantation distinguished themselves from 
others of the same name by adding to their names the 
designation "of Pine Hill." It was the home place of 
one branch of that family and the family graveyard of 
that branch is on it. 

South of "Pinckney Plains" and still West of the 
Ketelby tract came a large tract of land belonging to 
William Elliott whose land bounded the Ketelby tract 
on the West for the rest of its extension and also bounded 
it on the South. This tract was composed of five 
grants on and near Horse Savannah made to William 
Elliott,'^^ viz; 

27 June 1710 640 acres 

" 640 " 

" 640 " 

" 640 " 

23 July 1710... 640 " 

20 Jany 1711/12 640 " 

3200 " 

39M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. B. B., p. 239. 
40M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. P, No. 9, p. 20. 
4lOff: Secy, of State, vol. 39, p. 108. 
420ff: Secy, of State, vol. 39, pp. 125, 126. 



THE BARONIES OF SOUTH CAROLINA 159 

This William Elliott was one of the four Elliotts, viz: 
William, Thomas, John, and Joseph, who were apparently 
brothers and who appear as original emigrants and were 
the ancestors of the well known Elliott family in the 
low country of South Carolina, They were, or at least 
William Elliott was, presumably a Baptist for on the 
4^ Aug: 1712 he donated to John Raven Sen^ Richard 
Butler Ephraim Michael Lawrence Dennis John Raven 
Jun"" John Turner Jun*". and Henry Turner lot N°. 62 
in Charles Town for the use of the "people distinguished 
"by the name of Antipaedo Baptists"*^ On a part of 
the very lot so donated the First Baptist Church now 
stands in Church Street Charleston. 

This deed was apparently confirmatory of an earlier 
deed by him mad'e 18 July 1699 to WilHam Sadler 
John Raven Thomas BulHne Thomas Graves and 
John Elliott of the same lot in trust for the" Protestant 
Dissenting Antipaedo Baptists vulgarly called Ana- 
baptists."*^ John ElHott was also at that period a 
Baptist. WilHam Elliott in his Will dated 15 June 
1738 left to his three sons William, Thomas and Joseph 
£10,000. current money of South CaroHna (about 
£1,428.11.5 sterhng or S7142) and a tract of 15 3-4 
acres on Charles Town neck. The legacy and devise 
to his sons was absolute but as afterwards appeared 
upon a secret trust. Thomas Elliott his first son 
dying after him by his will dated 23 October 1738 
bequeathed to his brother Barnard ElHott £3333. 6s. 8d. 
"which was left me by my father's WiH Charging him 
"to make that Good use of it for which he knows it 
was given me" Joseph ElHott in his Will dated 11 
Febry 1739 left to "y^ Society of Christians y* M". Henry 
"Hey wood is now Minister of & I my self & two brothers 
"W"^. ElHott & Barnard EUiott and my only sister 
"Amerinthia Farr are now members of; I say to this 
"Society or to such persons whom they shall appoint to 
"receive itt I give the Sum of Three thousand pounds 
"and three hundred thirty three pounds six shilHngs 

430fT: Hist: Comm'n, Bk. Grants, 1712-1713, p. 60. 
44Prob: Ct: Charleston, Bk. 1754-1758, p. 55. 



160 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

"& Eight pence & my share of y^ Land on y^ Town neck 
"for ever" 

A few years later an information was filed by James 
Wright attorney General of the Province on the relation 
of "Henry Haywood Minister of the Society of Chris- 
"tians Called General Baptists and others" against 
William Elliott and the executors of his brothers Thomas 
and Joseph charging that the elder William Elliott had 
left this donation of £10,000. and 15 3-4 acres to his three 
sons upon a secret trust for the use of "the said Society 
"of Christians Called General Baptists meeting and 
"Communing in the worship of God at the Meeting 
"houses of Stono and Charleston."*^ By agreement 
the questions in contention under this charge were 
referred to William Cattell Jun"". John Savage and John 
Basnett as arbitrators who made an award in favour of 
the Society. The £10,000. was promptly paid and the 
land seems to have been conveyed to the Society.*^ 

The Society became, according to the record, extinct 
about January 1791 and the land then reverted to the 
heirs at law of the original donor William Elliott.*^ 
The land so devised was the tract in the City of Charles- 
ton now bounded by King, Radcliffe, Smith, and Morris 
Streets. It accordingly passed back into the owner- 
ship and possessions of the heirs of the original donor 
then living.*^ 

William Elliott and his family prior to his death 
evidently were members of this Society called "General 
Baptists." D*". Ramsay in his History of South Caro- 
lina (vol 2 p. 27) states that there was a subdivision of 
the Baptists formed about 1735 which was known by 
the name of Arian or General Baptists and which 
Society became extinct about 1787. 

In the work styled "Two centuries of the First 
Baptist Church of South Carolina" published in 1889 
it is stated that a secession from the Baptist Church 
"occurred in 1733 of a number of members under the 

45lbid, Bk. 1749-1751. p. 228. 

46Ibid, pp. 228, 314, 316. 

47M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. N, No. 9, p. 403. 

4 8 Case of Elliott vs. Morris. Harper, Eq: Rep:, p. 281. 



THE BARONIES OF SOUTH CAROLINA 161 

"lead of William Elliott J"", a man of influence and 
"intelligence who had adopted the Arian sentiments. 
"They assumed the name of General Baptists (the 
"mother church being known thereafter as Particular 
"Baptists)": that they sent to England for ministers 
obtaining first a M'. Ingram and afterwards M^ Henry 
Heywood. No reference is made to any authority for 
these statements which no doubt rested upon tradition 
among the continuing members of the Particular 
Baptists. 

The Elliotts seem also to have had close connections 
with the Charlestown Quakers for both Thomas Elliott 
the brother of this William and his son Thomas 
were married in the Quaker Meeting House in Charles 
Town.^^ Thomas Elliott was also associated with 
Ralph Emmes in procuring a grant for 1000 acres for 
the settlement of poor Quakers in the Province. ^° 

By his Will dated 15 June 1738 William Elliott devised 
these lands so granted to him as follows : 

To his son William 640 acres which the will states 
William had lately settled. 

To his son Thomas 640 acres which Thomas had 
settled. 

To his son Joseph 120 acres part of one grant and 320 
acres half of another grant, the other 320 acres of this 
grant having become the property of the testators 
"cousin Wilham Elhott" 

To his son Barnard 520 acres (the remainder of the 
640 acres from which the 120 acres to Joseph had been 
taken) and which 520 acres the will states the testator 
himself had first settled 

To his daughter Amerinthia Farr 610 acres. 

The 640 acres devised to his son William the latter 
by his Will dated 2 September 1765''' devised to his 
daughter Binkey who married Daniel Huger who on 
6 August 1779 conveyed this 640 acres to M"^^ Ann 

49S. C. Hist: & Gen: Mag:, vol. XI, pp. 58, 59. 
SOM. C. O. Charleston, Bk. O. O., p. 452. 
5iProbate Ct: Charleston, Bk. 1767-1776, p. 108. 



162 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Bvans^^ in the hands of whose descendants it apparently- 
continued until after 1850. 

This last WilHam EHiott in his Will after manu- 
mitting and providing for certain old slaves and be- 
queathing his other slaves to his children closes with 
the following earnest injunction to his legatees. "I 
"earnestly desire y* they would use all my poor Negroes 
"y* behave well and even tolerably well with great 
"humanity and Mercy and Especially W° they are old 
"and Infirm so I conclude with my Hearty Prayers to 
"Almighty God to send his Blessings to and happi- 
"ness upon all those both White and Black y*' are 
"mentioned in this Will which I shall leave behind me." 

The 640 acres devised to his son Thomas was by the 
latter by his will in 1738 devised to his three sons 
Thomas, Benjamin, and Samuel." It appears from the 
boundaries on old maps to have gone by partition or 
otherwise to Samuel and afterwards to have belonged 
about the beginning of the last century to William 
Boone Mitchell. 

The 120 acres and 320 acres devised to his son Joseph 
the latter by his will in 1739^* devised to his two brothers 
William and Barnard, and by some partition between 
these two they must have been allotted to Barnard as 
he by his will devises them to his own son Barnard. 

The 520 acres devised to his son Barnard the latter 
joined to the 120 and 320 acres adjoining acquired from 
his brother Joseph and by his will in 1758^^ devised the 
whole to his son Barnard Elliott as "my tract or tracts 
"of land about 960 acres at Horse Savannah" 

This last Barnard Elliott was Lt Col Barnard Elliott 
of the Revolution mentioned in the account of the 
Ashepoo Barony published in a previous number of 
this Magazine.^^ To this 960 acres Col ElUott added 
70 acres purchased from an adjoining tract and the 
whole was known as the "Hut" plantation and owned 

5 2M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. I?., No. 6, p. 30. 
53Prob: Ct: Charleston, Bk. 1736-1740, p. 258. 
S4lbid, p. 590. 

SSProb: Ct: Charleston, Bk. 1757-1760, p. 157. 
5 6S. C. Hist: & Gen: Mag:, vol. XV, p. 70. 



THE BARONIES OF SOUTH CAROLINA 163 

and occupied by Col Barnard Elliott during his life. 
After his death in 1778 upon the settlement of his estate 
this plantation was sold as "that valuable plantation 
"situate at Horse Savannah commonly called the Hut 
"containing about 300 acres of rice land and 700 acres 
"of high land, on the premises is a dwelling house, 
"barn, and other necessary buildings."" 

At the sale it was purchased by M" Susanna Carnes 
to whom it was conveyed 17 May 1792.^^ M". Carnes 
was the daughter of Benjamin Smith^^ and the second 
wife of Col Barnard Elliott. She it was who on P* 
July 1776 presented the second regiment "with an 
"elegant pair of colours, "^° at the same time making 
it a short address. The regiment carried both these 
colours when under the command of Lt Col Francis 
Marion it formed part of the force that assaulted the 
British position at Savannah in October 1779. The 
red colour came off safely but the blue colour which 
was borne by Lieutenant Bush he handed upon receiving 
a wound to Sergeant Jasper who himself had been 
already wounded. Whilst bearing the colour Jasper 
received a second and mortal wound and handed the 
colour back to Lieutenant Bush who almost immediately 
was himself mortally wounded and fell with the colour 
under his body. The blue colour then fell into the pos- 
session of the enemy and according to the statement of 
Captain Lewis Butler in his "Annals of the King's Royal 
Rifle Corps" lately published the blue colour was given to 
Major General Augustine Prevost the British Com- 
mander and is today in the possession of his greatgrand- 
son in England. 

M". Barnard Elliott survived Lt: Col: Elliott and 
after his death married Capt: Patrick Carnes. ^^ 

The 640 acres devised by William Elliott to his 
daughter Amerinthia^^ who married Thomas Farr was 

S7City Gazette and Daily Advertiser, for 12 May, 1792. 

5 8M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. T, No. 6, p. 36. 
S9S. C. Hist: & Gen: Mag:, vol. IV, p. 249. 
60Charleston Yrar Book, for 1889, p. 221. 

6 IS. C. Hist: & Gen: Mag:, vol. IV, p. 249. 

6 2M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. W, pp. 129, 135. 



164 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

by their son Thomas Farr in 1789 conveyed to WilHam 
Postell" who had acquired a large tract of land in the 
neighborhood. 

The 320 acres part of a grant for 640 acres which 
had been acquired by "cousin William Elliott" seems 
by statements on old maps to have been acquired by 
Benjamin Stead and with other adjoining lands owned 
by Stead formed a plantation called "Steadland" 
which also about the beginning of the last century 
was owned by William Boone Mitchell. 

Landgrave Edward Juckes mentioned as "Major" 
and "Col" Edward Juckes whose land according to 
the boundaries in the grant adjoined Landgrave Ketelby's 
but which the writer has never been able to locate 
was created a Landgrave on 9 April 1709^* and his 
patent was dated 14 April 1709 and is recorded in the 
office of the Historical Commission in Columbia^^ 

An Edward Juckes apparently came out to Carolina 
for he left a will in which he describes himself as of 
Charles Town in South Carolina. The will is dated 
4 October 1710 and was proved in England on 14 
November 1715.^^ There is nothing to identify him 
with the Landgrave beyond similarity of name, con- 
currence of dates, and other facts that the witnesses to the 
will include two of the most prominent men in the Pro- 
vince viz Governor Charles Craven and Nicholas Trott. 
The writer has never been able to identify any lands or 
barony of his in the colony beyond the mere mention of 
his land as a boundary of the lands described in the grants 
in that vicinity of Landgrave Ketelby, John Cooper^^ 
and William Elliott^^ 

It is possible that he had the land surveyed out 
preparatory to a grant but that no grant was ever 
issued and the lands were afterward taken up by and 
granted to some one else. 

63lbid, Bk. E, No. 6, p. 78. 

64Collns Hist: Soc: of S. C. vol. I, p. 178.' 

6SGrant Bk. Q. 0-, 1685-1712, p. 273. 

66S. C. Hist: & Gen: Mag:, vol. IX, p. 122. 

670fT: Secy. State, vol. 39, p. 101. 

68Ibid, pp. 125, 126. 



THE BARONIES OF SOUTH CAROLINA 165 

In 1722 Susannah Baker the then owner of the 
"Villa" tract filed her memorial stating that it was 
composed of part of a grant to John Cooper dated 
29 Sepf 1710 and part of a grant to Charles Craven 
dated 9 April 1714 and had been conveyed to her by- 
Thomas Cutliffe in 1722 and then bounded Northwest 
on land laid out to Major Edward Jukes. ^' But the 
land on this boundary had then been granted to Land- 
grave Ketelby. The probable inference is that Land- 
grave Juckes came out to the Province in 1709; had 
lands surveyed out preparatory to a grant, died in 
1710 before any grant was issued and the lands were 
then granted to others. 

69 Off: Hist: Comm. Memo Bk. 3: P 60 



ORDER BOOK 
of 

John Faucheraud Grimke 
August 1778 to May 1780. 

{Continued from the July Number) 

May 9'\ 1779 
9: Parole— Granby C: S: Guard, Gold. 

Field O. for the day tomorrow Major Pinckney 
B: M: Capt. Bowie 

When the Army marches in future, the Commissaries, 
Waggons & the Cattle on foot will fall in, immediately 
after the advance Corps. 

On the March, Officers will be constantly with their 
Platoons, & take particular care that the men do not 
leave the Ranks, but in cases of absolute Necessity; 
and to prevent its being done for Water they will cause 
the men to fill their Canteens in the Morning before 
they leave the Grounds. Care must be taken that the 
men do not straggle, maraud or injure the Inhabitants: 
in short they are not to leave their platoons on any 
Consideration whatever without leave first obtained 
of the Officer Commanding the Platoon. 

The Waggon Masters are to be careful that the 
Waggoners do not presume to halt for their Horses to 
drink in the Brooks or Rivulets through which they 
pass, without Orders for that purpose. 

This Order will be carefully published to the Wag- 
goners that Delinquents may not pleade Ignorance in 
their Justification. 

Colonel Hammond being Senior Officer of the Horse, 
is to have the Command of them & be obeyed & re- 
spected accordingly. 
A:0: 

The Gen', is to beat tomorrow Morning at four 
oClock, the Assembly at half past four & the Army 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKE 

marches precisly at five by the left, Gen'. WilUamson's 
Brigade preceeding. — The Light Horse to be advanced. — 
Col°. Malmody is appointed to command the Light 
Troops — They will form the advance Guard. The 
Georgia Troops march in the Line. 

10: Lower Three Runs. 

Parole — Haslerig C: S: Hampden; Hollis. 

F: O: for the day tomorrow, CoF. Armstrong 
B: M: Cap*. Ladson. 

The Troops will be immediately supplied with half 
a Gill of Rum ^ Man, & two pounds Beef & One 
pound & a Quarter of Flour — The whole will be cooked 
this Afternoon. 

The Army will march tomorrow by the Right— The 
General beats at half past three in the morning & 
the Assembly at four — The march will commence at 
half past four precisely — The Horse advanc'd — The 
Light Infantry to compose the advanced Guard — The 
Park to march between the first & second Line— The 
waggons to fall in the Line as to day — Fifty pioneers 
under a Captain & two Subalterns, to be provided 
with Tools by the Q : M : G : & to march in front of the 
advanced Guard. 

Twenty Light Horse are to attend the Commissary 
as a Guard for the battle, to be relieved daily. 
A: O: 

That Ignorance may no longer be pleaded in Excuse 
of Breach of Orders, The Gen^ directs that the Officers 
of the Different Corps in Camp immediately inform 
the Men under their Command, that the unmiHtary 
& Dangerous practice of firing about Camp can & will 
no longer be borne, 'Tis a practice of the most dangerous 
tendency & maybe productive of Disgrace to the Army 
& irreparable Injury to the State — Any Offenders who 
shall be detected after this Notice may depend on meet- 
ing that severe Punishment due to a Breach of Orders 
which have through Tenderness been frequently re- 
peated. Nor will any Excuse what ever be conceived 
sufficient to screen the DeHnquent. 



168 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Officers of all Denominations will endeavour to 
inforce this Order as they regard the Good of the Service 

11: Kelly's Cowpen. 

Parole C: S: 

Brig''. Gen*, for day tomorrow, Gen*. Sumner. 
F: O: for the day tomorrow CoP. Thomas 
B: M. Cap*. Raiford. 
The Gen*, will beat tomorrow Morning at half past 
three, the Assembly at four, & the Army will march 
at half past four. 

The fatigue party to be paraded on the Grand Pa- 
rade at beating the Assembly, & there delivered to 
the Officer who is to command them, who will march 
them to the O: M: Gen*'^. where they are to be furnished 
with Tools — they will march in front of the Light 
Infantry 

The Director Gen*, will appoint a Surgeon to accom- 
pany the F: O. of the Day in the rear of the Line to 
discriminate between the Sick & well. 

The Q: M: G. will order a few of the lightest Wag- 
gons to march immediately in the rear of the Line. 

12: Mill, 25 Miles below Kelly's Cowpen. 

The adjutants are directed to deliver Rolls for the 
Men for Duty to the Brigade Major on the Brigade 
Parade, specifying the regiments & Companies to which 
they belong, & the Brigade Major will deliver to the 
Officer Command^, the party Rolls specifying the 
Brigades & Regiments to which they belong. 

Whenever a fatigue Party receives Tools, the Officer 
Com^. is not only to keep an exact Roll of the Mens 
Names, but to note opposite to each Name the Tools 
he has received for which he is to be accountable 

Gen*. Butler's Brigade is to be annexed to Gen*. 
Huger's Division. 

No Waggons or Teams are to be discharged by any 
person whatever but the Q: M: Gen*. 

The Gen*, will beat at half past three, the Assembly 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKE 169 

at four & the Army will march by the left at half past 
four tomorrow morning. 

The Guards for tomorrow, the Brigade Q^ M*". of 
Major of each Brigade, & ten Light Horsemen, will 
attend on the Parade at assembly beating tomorrow, 
their to receive their Orders 

Brig''. Gen', for tomorrow Gen'. Butler. 
F: O: Cor. Johnson 
B: M: Cap". Lowry 
Gen*. WilUamson's Brigade are to discharge their 
loaded Arms at Sun Sett. 

13: Four Miles below Boxes Ferry. 

Parole Laurens, C: S: Lee, Long. 

Brigadier for tomorrow Gen'. Williamson 

F: O: CoP. M<=Dowell. 

B : M : Cap\ Bowie. 
The general will beat tomorrow Morning at three 
oClock, the Assembly at a Quarter after three & the 
Army will march at four A fatigue party of One hun- 
dred Men are to be paraded & marched off at the beat- 
ing of the General, The Light Infantry will march at 
the Same time & the Q: M: G. will order a Waggon 
with the Entrenching Tools to accompany them. 
The Army marches by the right. 

14th May, 1779 Ford's Ferry. 

14: Parole C: S: 

Brigadier for tomorrow CoP. Pinckney 
F: O: Cor. Winn. 

B: M: Cap*. Ladson 

The Waggon Master is not take [sic ] any Teams 
from the Brigade Waggons without applying first to 
the Brig"". Gen', or Com*, of the Brigade. 

A Gen'. Court Martial is to sit tomorrow Morning 
at Six oClock for the Tryal of all Prisoners that may 
be brought before them — President Major Wise — 
Three Captains & four Subalterns from the S° Caro- 
lina, two Captains & two Subalterns from the N°. 



170 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Carolina Brigade & one Captain from the Georgia 
Troops. 

15: Fords Ferry. 

Parole New Castle. C: S: Nice; Nevers. 
Brigadier for tomorrow Gen'. Sumner 
F: O: Cor. Mayson 

B:M. Cap". Raiford. 

Cap". Taylor is desired to act as Judge advocate to 
the Gen'. Court Martial ordered yesterday — All Wit- 
nesses are to attend. 

A Cap", from the regiment of Artillery is to sit as a 
member of the Gen'. Court Martial in place of a Cap- 
tain from the Georgia Brigade. 

Returns of the Brigades & Corps now in Camp are 
immediately required. 

Major Armstrong put his Port Manteau into a 
Waggon on the March yesterday, if the Waggoner 
who has it in his Possession will deliver it at Head 
Quarters he will be rewarded. 

Ammunition Returns are to be made at four oClock 
this afternoon. 

All the Entrenching Tools which have at any time 
been deHvered out are immediately to be returned to 
the Q: M: G'. 

The Irregularity & Inconvenience arising from a 
mixture of horse & foot are too obvious to require any 
Explanation ; therefore whenever the Army is to march, 
the Light Horse will parade in front of the Line (unless 
ordered to the contrary) and all Horsemen not belong- 
ing to the Cavalry & paraded with them or intitled to 
forage by their Com'^. or leave from the General, the 
Servants of Such Officers who serve on Horseback 
excepted, may expect to have their Horses delivered 
to the Q: M: Gen'. 

(To be continued.) 



BROUGHTON LETTERS. 
Copied and Annotated by D. E. HuGER Smith. 

These letters refer principally to the first three 
generations of the Broughtons of The Mulberry on 
Cooper River, and are especially interesting for the 
allusions to local historical events, such as those of the 
great Yamassee War and of the Spanish Invasion of 
Georgia, terminated by their defeat at Bloody Marsh. 
An account of this from Spanish sources is in the pos- 
session of the Georgia Historical Society, and has been 
recently published. 

Theo fficial and public career of Hon. Thomas 
Broughton has been quite fully given by McCrady in 
the first two volumes of his History of South Carolina; 
and in Vol. XI, of this magazine, p. 193, can be found an 
account of "The Fairlawn Barony" by Hon. H. A. M. 
Smith. This tells of his settlement of "The Mul- 
berry" plantation. 

The following is an abstract of his will (see Probate 
Court Records, Book 1736-40, page 177): 

Will dated 22 July 1725, proved 3 Feb. 1737, in which 
he describes himself as of St John's Berkley. 
To wife Anne Broughton £75 Proclamation money 

per Annum 
To said wife Anne "the Capitol! Messuage Tenement 

Mansion or Dwelling House called the Mulberry" 

&c for life. 
To daughter Johanna Broughton * * * 

given to my said daughter by her grandfather Hon. 

Sir Nathaniel Broughton, K' dec'^. * * * 

If my sister M" Christiana Broughton should come to 

Carolina to reside * * * 

To daughter Joanna at 18 or marriage 
To daughter Christiana at 18 &c 
To daughter Constantia at 18 &c 
To three sons Nathaniel, Andrew, and Robert &c 
Whereas I possess at the head of Ashley River 1000 

acres S. E on Andrew Percival, now of 



172 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Donning Esq, S. W on Richard Bedon, N. W. on 
Thomas Steer, N. B. on Cypress Swamp * * 

this land to be sold. 

To youngest son Robert (said to be under 21) two tracts 
described, amounting in all to 1120 acres called 

Mount Pleasant. 

To eldest Son Capt. Nathaniel Broughton at death of 
my wife Mulberry, to be in lieu of Seaton, settled at 
his marriage to M". Henrietta Charlotte Broughton 
his now wife. 

To Son Andrew Broughton said plan" Seaton * * 

To grandson Thomas Broughton, son of Capt Nathan- 
iel Broughton, plan" Kiblesworth, 938 acres adjoin- 
ing Seaton. 

To grandson Nathaniel Broughton 

To grandson Alexander Broughton, 3'^^ son of Capt. 
Broughton 

To Anne Broughton, daughter of Capt. Nathaniel 
Broughton 

To daughter Anne, wife of John Gibbes 

To granddaughter Elizabeth Gibbes and possible other 
child of said daughter. 

Executors: wife, Hon Robert Johnson, son Nathaniel; 
wit^ Hugh Butler Esq., M^ Anthony [Huggit?], 
Thomas EUery. 

Capt. Nathaniel Broughton commanded a com- 
pany during the Yamassee War (1715), at which time 
therefore he was probably at least 25 years of age, and 
it must have been somewhere about that time that 
he married, for his eldest son was born in 1717. 

An interesting light is thrown upon his services by 
the Journal of the March into the Cherokee Mountains 
edited by Langdon Cheves Esq and printed in the 
Charleston Year Book for 1894. 

Capt. Broughton's will is dated 6 Oct 1754. 

The Society has been enabled to print these letters 
from the originals by the kind permission of M^ Joseph 
Ferguson Hey ward. 



BROUGHTON LETTERS 173 

[From M" Thomas Broughton] 
For M'. Nath' Broughton 

these 
My Dear Natt 

Your father I bles God continews to grow better 
every day, he has had nothing of the flux since you went 
away, and complaines only of weekness. as to the 
newes of the Charakees^ what wee hear'd wee was 
told came from wasamsaw but have seen one since 
that came directly from thence, and knowes nothing 
of it, soe suppos it is all false. I hope to see the to 
morrow and beg of the allwayes to remember the great 
account wee are all to give one day, that it may pre- 
serve you from being led into sin, by the ill examples 
that surrounds you. Your father and aunt give their 
love to you, and I am my Dear Child allways 

Your affectionate Mother 
give your Aunt's A. Broughton 

and my love to johny 

Oct. 14: 1715 

Your father orders me to tell you to take care to 
keep out scouts every day 



[From Thomas Broughton — late of the Council — later 
. Lt. Governor, written about November 1715] 
[Addressed] To Capt° Nathaniel' Broughton at y* 

Camp 
My Deare Natt 

your two horses was found yesterday morning in 
my Corn field if Cippy had not come downe last night I 
should have sent the horses to you this morning, as 
you desired I have kept your horses here and sent up 

young Comet and your Trumpeter y*" y 

I understand by Generall Moore^ y^ forces are to march 

iThe great Yamassee War broke out 15th April, 1715. The Chero- 
kees were believed to be connected with the conspiracy, and their incur- 
sions were continuously feared. See McCrady's Proprietary Govern- 
ment, 536. 

2 James Moore, son of Gov. James Moore (1700). He commanded 

second Tuscarora expedition, and was chosen Governor at the Revolution 

of 1719. For the journal of this march into the Cherokee country, see 

Year Book, City of Charleston, 1894, page 324 — edited by Langdon 

Cheves, Esq. 



174 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

next weeke for Savanoe Towne, you will have but little 
time to prepaire I have leave from your Cornell for 
you to Come home to morrow night, so Consider what 
you will want to Carrie out and on Munday I will goe 
to Towne to provide for your march. 

Wee are all well here except your poore Sister Jo- 
anna^ who is still very weake but I hope a little better. 
I pray God keep and protect thee my Deare Child, 
& beleive me 

Thy 

truly affectionate 
Father Tho: Broughton 

fryday 

my service to Coir Chicken^ 

[P. S. ] your ant Ashby^ I beleive will goe home to 
morrow However bring your Couzen Joan w^ you. 



^ [From Hon. Thomas Broughton ] 
[Addressed] To 

M''. Nathaniell Broughton att Charlestowne 
These 

My Deare Son. 

M^ Guerard^ having occasion to send y^ Indian boy 
to Towne If Tome is not Come away w*^ what I wrote 
to you for, you may Send the things by y^ bearer he 
being to call at y^ Mulberry. 

3Joanna, daughter of Hon. Thomas Broughton, married Thomas 
Monck, Esq., Thursday, 1, Jan., 1732. See S. C. Gazette of 15th Jan., 
1732. Salley's Marriage Notices. 

4Col. George Chicken, a distinguished officer. See his journal of the 
march of Col. Maurice Moore, through the Cherokee country of Georgia 
and South Carolina, in Year Book, 1894, pages 315-352. 

SConstantia Broughton, a sister of Hon. Thomas Broughton, married 
John Ashby, 2nd. Cacique. She died 20 Jan., 1720/21— See St. Thomas 
Reg. 

6 The date of this letter can only be approximated but not very closely. 
The Mr. Guerard mentioned in it is almost surely Peter Guerard, whose 
will was proved 8th Aug., 1724, and whose sister Hannah later married 
Andrew Broughton of Seaton, son of Hon. Thomas Broughton. Mrs. 
Buretel, also mentioned, died before 20 Nov., 1727, as that is the date of 
the warrant to appraise her personalty. Mrs. Buretel was the mother 
of Mrs. Alexandre Thesee de Chastaigner de Lisle, whose daughter 
Henrietta Charlotte married Capt. Nathaniel Broughton. The fear of 
illness "in Towne," was probably due to one of the frequent recurrences 
of Yellow Fever. 



BROUGHTON LETTERS 175 

Cap". Butler tells me there is a large Caskett Come 
for me in y^ last ship from England, and y* it is not to 
bee delivered to any but my Selfe, enquier for it, if 
its delivered to you y^ will be y^ Same as if I received it. 

Dont forgett to enquier for Corne and if possible 
Secure 40 bush"^ y* will make us easie; I heare there 
is Corne at Severall places on Ashley River, if you cant 
meet w**" any before you come out of Towne, employ 

Doctore Conyers, or M*". to watch y** 

periaug:" y* come downe for I am satisfied there is 
Corne Still to be bought. 

I cant but be conserned for feare of your falling ill 
in Towne, take care of your selfe, and Stay noe Longer 
there than needs must. Wee are all here I bless God 
well; oure Humble Service to Madam Buretell^ and 
affectionate love to my Deare Daughter^ and be assured 
that I am 

My Deare Child 
Thy truly affectionate 
Munday Father 

Morning Tho: Broughton 

[P. S. ] If you send up any Tea pray secure ye top of 
the cannester for feare Should come open with Shaking 



[From M" Thomas Broughton] 
For M^ Nath'^ Broughton 

these 
My Dear Child 

pray send me by the boy that brings the horses on 
Saterday 30 shiUings which is due hear, and forgot to 
put mony in my pocket to pay it, I will return it to 
you as soon as I come home but am not willing to 
send your fathers kees for fear the boy should loos 
them, pray remember to send to pamer to make a 
pair of shoos for Joanna, my Dear Natt the consarn for 
your soul lies heivily upon my heart, lest the present 
injoyments of this world should take up all your thoughts 
and affections. Consider my Dear child I beg of you, 
that there is an eternity acoming that merrits as well 

6See Note No. 6. 



176 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

as requires your chefest cair, I have often desired you 
to look over your catichisem. and consider what vows 
and promises was made for you in your baptisem which 
it is now high time for you to think of renewing at the 
lord's table as your sister has don, which will still 
more strictly oblege you to live in the neglect of no 
known duty, nor commission of any evel, remember 
you depend on the allmighty for life and all things, 
and it is impieous to live without acknowledging that 
dependance by praying to him, and praising of him, 
having seldom oppertunity of speaking to you, I could 
say a great deal more now, but time will only allow me 
to assure you and your wife that I am as allwayes 

Your affectionat Mother 
Dec*^"'. 5: 1716 Anne Broughton 

My services to M" Latour 

[P. S. ] pray send your fathers — when the horses 

goe for him, and be sure send my horse for one, rather 
than your gray, let Nancy beet up some jocolet, and 
send what — — will be home on Saterday 



[From Andrew Broughton of London ] 
to Col° Thomas Broughton 
att Carolina 

pr Capt Taylor 

London y" 19''' may 1721 
Dear Bro. 

I have yo" of y" 26^'^ Decemb"" last, & 9*^ of March last; 
by w''*' had y^ disagreeable news of Poor Sister Ashby's^ 
Death, Poor woman, I feare she was und"" great trobles 
w*^ shortened her days; there is some small matter 
due to her in my hands I will soon send y^ acc"^ : and de- 
sire to know if must be paid to her sister Ashby [sic ] 
as was intended, if not when send y*" acc"^ shall desire 
y" to pay y^ BaP: may be, y° beeing much more 

in my as yet no hope of getting yo'' Sallery 

at the Custome house till y° send some acc"^ w*"^ M"" 
Carles [ ? ] tells me are wanting & writt y° at full about 
this matter by Cap" Bell whose long detain w*^ 

7See Note No. 4. 



BROUGHTON LETTERS 177 

y^ Governmen* hath been a misfortune y"" affaire^ 

as I feare in y^ Generall an other in yo"" Col- 

lonay; but hapely this tyme is got saife to y° 

& that that matter have a good turne to y^ 

advantage of those I wish well. All yo" lett" w** came 
to my hands for Commiss" of y^ Customs was care- 
fully delivered and hope y° have had an them 
from y*" Board. I am very sorry for yo*" disapointment 
but not in my Power to doe any thing, for y^ Custome 
here is nothing but fare promises w"^ out performance, 
everyone makeing y^ best for himselfe & wee are come 
to that pass as not to have any regard for friendship, 
but to get the most they can from friend or foe. I 
doubt not but y" have heard of great Estates gott, 
& others lost, but I am not in any wayes conserned, 
only my spouse will be a sufferer [ ? ] in part of her 
fortune by some w*^"^ subscribed unto y^ S. 
Sea; I had my [sister's?] letf on yo" Covers, which 
doe not answer supposeing will be come away before 
this reaches yo"" hands. I intend y^ by Cap" Taylor 
tho another shipp will be sooner by going directly, 
& this I understand goes by way of Barmudas but 
doubting not of his care in delivering it saife makes me 
chuse to send it by him. My Poor spouse hath been 
ill all y^ winter, but hope as y^ warm weather comes on 
she is better wee both desire our complem*'® 
to all our Relation® Especially to y° & my sister, I am, 
good Bro: 

yo*" Ever affec* Bro*" 

A Broughton 



[From M" Nath^ Broughton] 
[Addressed] To 

Nath: Broughton Esq*". 
In Charles Town 
These 

June y" 15: 1732 
My Dear 

I sent on Sunday to wassamsaw about the fouls, 
my father having forgot to tell me what you desired 



178 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

till Saturday, therefore could send no sooner M"". Law- 
son sent me worde his wife had none fit for yens as yet, 
he came down on Tusday and tould me had heard of 
Some at wampee* but could not possably git them at 
wassamsaw^ till last night or this day, and as my father 
thought it was time the things should goe down I 
have done my best, could get but 3 dozen yong fouls 
in all the nabour hood which I send with 14 young gees, 
they have bin well fed but it is so short a time that 

be but little the better, I design 2 of them for 

cosin Manigault^° if you think well of it should have 
sent her some fouls if they could have bin had but 
hope to make it up another time, pray give my affec- 
tionate servis to her I was sorry to hear by M*" Le Bas^^ 
she was not well and wish her better health, I allso 
send the Star grass, I cant hear of any ducks to be had 
nor donte think they can be fit to eat yet, nor turkeys 
having seen none larger than pigeons, I have not bin 
at the Mulberry since I recieved your letter in which 
the oat meal is mention 'd so donte know whether it 
is wanted, but think if you send a little by the boat 
it wil not be amiss for in case it should not be wanted 
I could keep it, M^ Rotmahaler^^ was hear yesterday 
he has taken up one of his bonds the princeple & interest 
comes to £324 od shileings he designed to take the other 

sWampee was a country neighborhood near the present site of Pin- 
opolis, "in the waters of" Biggin Creek. 

SWassamsaw (variously spelled) was the country bordering on Was- 
samsaw Swamp, the head waters of Ashley River. 

lOAnn Asbby. who married Gabriel Manigault 29th April, 1730 — See 
St. Thomas Regr — She was the mother of Peter Manigault, for certain 
of whose letters, see this Magazine, vol. XV, p. 113. 

11 The Lords Proprietors on 15 Nov., 1680, granted to Landgrave 
West 1500 acres "on the westernmost side of the westernmost branch of 
Cooper River;" said West, on 7th Dec, 1686, sold same to James LeBas, 
from whom the land descended to his son and heir-at-law, Paul Peter 
LeBas, who died on or about 8 Feb., 1724, and the land descended to his 
eldest son and heir-at-law, who on 21st April, 1735, conveyed 1000 acres 
of said tract to Thomas Monck, on west side of Biggin Creek — see M. 
C. O. Book N, page 300. This was the plantation called Mitton, of 
which in accordance with his marriage settlement, made 6 Jan, 1731/2, 
with Joanna, daughter of Hon. Thomas Broughton, Thomas Monck 
conveyed to her trustees 600 acres on 22 March, 1738. See M. C. O., 
Book I, 456. 

12 Job Rothmahler, who married Anne Dubosc, daughter of James 
Dubosc. 



BROUGHTON LETTERS l79 

Up soon, nancy being in want of gounds desier M". 
LaTour^^ will get withall to make her a couple, I desire 
it may be something that looks well they not being for 
comon wair, my sister Broughton desiers her to get her 
a pair of mens gloves at M" ceraus [Sereau?] that will fit 
cosin manigault she gives her servis to you and all with 
you, pray give my love to M"^ La Tour I hope se will 
excuse my not writing to her, I shall be glad to know 
whether my neess mazick^* is brought a bed desier to 
be remembered to her if you see her, I wish Capt warren 
a happy voiage, we are all as the doct left us, but have 

heard my has had a bad night I hope to hear 

by the unity you continue mending which will 

be a great Satisfaction to 

Dear Life 
your affectionate wife 
H. Charlotte Broughton 
I send 4 chairs to be bottomed, since you are likely 
to recieve some mony should be glad M" La Tour 
would bye me a gound as I desired her. 



[From M". Nath' Broughton] 
[Addressed] To 

Nath: Broughton Esq". 
In Charles Town 
These 

february y" 8: 1733/4 
My Dear 

the wether being bad have order'd sipio to stay at 
y^ Gov" as you desier, except it should brake up in 

i3Mrs. Charlotte La Tour. Her will, dated 9th Nov., 1754 and proved 
18 May, 1756, mentions all the then living children and grandchildren of 
Capt. Nathaniel Broughton. She devises to her cousin Jane Cabanis 
and her (Jane's) grandchildren. It is suggested that she was of the 
Chastaigner family, but entirely without evidence. 

14 Catherine de Chastaigner, daughter and heiress of Alexandre de 
Chastaigner, who was brother of Mrs. Broughton, married Paul Mazyck, 
a son of Isaac Mazyck, the immigrant. She was born 17 September, 
1711, was married August 1729, and died 17th Jany., 1748-9. Her 
husband died the next day, and they were carried to the grave together, 
and buried at Pooshee, the plantation of Mr. Rene Louis Ravenel. Mr. 
Ravenel had married the widow of Alexandre de Chastaigner, born 
LeNoble. See Ravenel's Records &c., also M. C. O., Book C. C, 474. 



180 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

the evening as it does some times, & be likely to be 

fair till morning, your came home on tuesday 

of his boyls broke the day before and the other 

yesterday they both run still a great deal I believe each 
a spoon full at a time when they are dresst, I think the 
first runs a great while shall be glad when you are at 
home to see how they look as I cant, he is pretty easey 
now he has taken the last dose of his phisick this morn- 
ing the rest of the family is well, M" I^a Tour gives 
her service & desiers youll get her an ounce of bettony, 
I dont doubt but docf Clieland has some & that he will 
spare you that quantity she finds great benefit by it 
for her head, having biit little salt peeter left desier 
you will get some, mad" Gibbes ho is hear gives her 
service to you, pray make mine acseptable to our 
frinds & thank sister monck and cosin manigault for 
their present I send a baskit which I believe is your 

cosins duty to my father and believe me 

— Dear 

your affectionate wife 
Charlotte Broughton 



[From Thomas Broughton J"" — son of Andrew Brough- 
ton of Seaton] 

Cha. Town April 26^ 1742 

Hon'^. Sir, 

Yours I've Rec'd and Shou'd have Delivered your 
Letter to M'. Boneau^^ but he is not in Town but will 
Deliver it to him as soon as he comes to Town 

My Father^^ is not yet gone over the Barr he is still 
Lying in the Road waiting for a Wind he wants. M*". 
Watson he mends every Day Maverick is not yet come 
to Town Occasioned by Contrary Winds. 

IS Mr. Boneau, probably Capt. Anthony Bonneau, whose will was 
proved 8 Feb., 1743. He owned the plantation at the T of Cooper 
River, now called Bonneau's Ferry. 

i6Andrew Broughton of Seaton. He married Hannah Guerard. 
See Note 6. 



BROUGHTON LETTERS 181 

Pray my Compliments to all Friends 
I Remain 

Hon^ S^ 

your ever Duty' & Obt. 

Nep''. 
Tho: Broughton Jr. 



[From Alexander Broughton ] 
[Addressed:] To Nath" Broughton Esq"^ 

These 
Hon*^. Sir, 

I was very sorry to hear yesterday that you had a 
return of the disorder in your head & that sister 
Jenys'^ had the Colick. I shall be glad to hear you & 
my Sisters are better, we are indiferent well & joyn 
in Duty Love & Service as due 
I remain 

Hon Sir 

your Duty" & Obed*. Son 
Alex". Broughton 
To 

Nath" Broughton Esq"" 
These 



[From Thomas Broughton — son of Capt. Nathaniel ] 
[Addressed] To 

Nath Broughton Esq^ 
These 

New Market Plantation 
July 27^ 1742 
Hon^ S'}' 

17 Henrietta Broughton. She married Paul Jenys, whose will was 
proved 1 May, 1752. Her will dated 30 May, 1758, was proved 17 Feb., 
1759. She appears to have left no children and mentions only Broughton 
relations. 

18 It is strange that McCrady's History makes no mention of the events 
spoken of in this letter. • The Gazettes from July 5th, 1742 to Sept. 6th, 
1742, give full details of this invasion of Georgia by the Spaniards, and of 
the defeat inflicted upon them by Genl. Oglethorpe. There were a number 
of vessels fitted out by the Province of vSouth Carolina to assist him and 
a considerable force assembled in Charles Town. Six hundred men 
and 140 guns — carriage and swivels — were sent to his assistance. The 
Carolina armed vessels were put under the command of the English Com- 
modore, and many other interesting details were recounted. 



182 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

I've reed yours by Jeamy and am Obliged to you 
for your inquiry after us. I sent you the most Per- 
ticular acc\ that I cou'd get of the General's sucksess 
by Peter Cahusack^' this morning. I was in town this 
afternoon when rec"^. yours and find that Every body 
in general are of Oppinion that the Enemy are re- 
turned home and we only wait for the Governor's 
Orders to be Dischargd. Our fleet Consists of 9 
Sale of Vessels including y^ men of warr besides the 2 
galleys the whole contain about 12 hund**. men we 
are tould that they Lay at anchor opposite to Stono 
on thursday Last notwithstanding they had fair wind 
so may expect no great Matters from them have 
heard nothing of the Verginia Ship more than what 
I wrote you. M"" Knight went to town in order to 
get himself armes but unhappily met with one of Cap- 
tains of the privateers who was an Old acquaintance 
and after geting pretty merry according to Custom 
enlisted on board of the General's Schooner I endea- 
vourd to persuade him to Let me buy his armes for 
him but woud not be satisfied without going himself. 

1 tould the Colonel the consequence of this going to 
town and put him off severall times but by fair 
promises and often importunity got Leave at Last 
for a few hours. 

This poor unhappy man was wallow about the Streets 

2 or 3 Days in a miserable Condition but have heard 
nothing of him Since the Vessel Went Down, the Last 
time I see him he Desird I woud Let you know he 
Designd to go and whip the Spaniards Backsides and 
then return to his old habitation, the Mulberry, if 
my People should want Provisions before I get home 
beg you get them what will be necessarry if any to be 
had. 

I am glad to learn my Mother is better heartily wish 

19 Peter Cahusack — See St. Philips Regr. — the marriage of Peter 
Cahusac to Mary Manzequen 18 June, 1749. This was a well-known 
family of St. Stephen's and St. John's Berkley. 



BROUGHTON LETTERS 183 

her and all our friends health pray Our Duty Love and 
Service as Due 

I am hon**. Sir y"" most 

Dutifull & Obedt Son 
Tho : Broughton 
My Aunt was much out of order this morning Shes 
better this evening & Desires youl Excuse her not 
writing by this oppertunity will Do it p"" Next 

[Mem" copied below is in handwriting of said Thomas ] 

Thomas Broughton's Birth October 17^ 1717^° 
Mary Broughton's Birth August 19**^ 1725 

We were married March 4^'' 1745/6 by the Rev** 
M"". Thompson 

My wife was Delivered of a Dead Boy Dec"^ 17*** 
1746 

My Wife Mary Departed this Life Dec' 18, 1746 



[From Robert Johnson — a son of Gov Robert John- 
son] 
[Addressed] To 

Nath' Broughton Esq"" 
in South Carohna 
[Mem" near seal] rec*^ y^ 2 may 1744 

pr 

[mem°. inside ] D D D Deas 

s^ 
D^ s'. 

It is a long time Since had the pleasure of hearing 
from you nor have had any answer to my two last 
letters of the 20*^ of October last was twelve months 
and the 3*^. of last May, which both related chiefly to 
M"^. Manigaults affairs; — 

1 must now inform you that your Aunt Chris*. 
Broughton is dead, and as she has taken notice of her 
nephews and nieces, thought it proper to insert you 
that paragraph of her Will, viz: and after the death of 

2 0Thomas Broughton married Mary Izard, daughter of Walter Izard 
of Cedar Grove and widow of Charles Izard. See S. C. Hist. & Gen. 
Mag., vol. Ill, 230. 



184 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

my said Sister Lydia Broughton, I give one fourth 
part of my said Estate, to my Severall Nephews, and 
Nieces, the Children of my late deceased Brother, 
and Sisters, Tho^ Broughton, Mary Chamberlain, 
Alethea Acklom, and Constantia Ashby, who shall 
be living at my Death in equal proportions share and 
share alike, if more than one, and if but one, of such 
my Said Nephews and Nieces shall be then liveing, 
my Will is that he, or she, shall have the whole said 
fourth part. 

The rest of her Estate after two or three small lega- 
cies, she leaves to her sister, and as she has left me her 
Executor, you may depend upon it, shall take as much 
care of your interest as my own, for am glad of any 
opportunity to convince you of my sincere friendship, 
and desire you will from me acquaint all my Cousins 
interested in this affair, that they may be thoroughly 
satisfied of the same care. 

I desire you will write by the first Opportunity, and 
send me a list of the above mentioned parties, with 
their Christian names &c. and should likewise be glad 
to know how affairs go on in your parts. A French 
Warr is expected to be declared every day and also 
a general Engagement with our fleets in the Medi- 
teranean, if the Enemies dare come out of their har- 
bours, I am D*" S^ your 

Most Aflfec*. Humble 
Ser*. R. Johnson 

P. S. My best Compliments offet'*. [or attends] 
all friends. 



[From Capt Thomas Reaston to Thomas Broughton, 

eldest son of Capt. Nathaniel Broughton ] 
[Addressed:] To 

M". Tho". Broughton 

Charlestown y^ 28*** Decem^ 1750 
Dear Sir 

I could not omit y*. first opportunity which this day 
offers to advise you of my safe arrival here the very 



BROUGHTON LETTERS 185 

Day I desired &c (viz) Xmassday & in good time so as 
to get my Dinner tho: I Did not make the Land till 
8 the Clock y* morning & it was y* very Barr Exactly 
of off which several vessels has Been above 3 weeks & 
not go in yet so V you will also allow I was very Luckey 
& none of y^ vessels this year was less than 10 12 13 
weeks of their Passages out save Cowe and myself who 
had the greatest chance to have made the greatest 
passage that ever was for y* very day 12 days after I 
left England I was more than 2 /3'^^ my passage to 
Carolina & had y^. wind continued but 6 days longer 
I had Easily After made my passage in 18 days whole 
but was prevented; for 3 weeks after y* did not get 
100 Leagues, but to return what added most to my 
pleas'" was to hear & finde all my friends well here save 
Coll* Ashby^^ who is dead & his son Tho^^^ married as 
is Cousin Andrew Broughton^^ of all which no Doubt 
you'l have or will be Informed as also y^ fine prices 
you get for so great Crops viz £3 Intolerable [sic ] but 
I'le say no more but refer you to Cousin Alex"^^* to 
whom I gave all your Letters sent ^ me and now flatter 
myself you are in perfect health & have something 
Better an Oppinion of England y° I finde you had 
when I left it where I hope to see you by May Next 
&c. I shall send your chest of Florence^^ to y^ Mull- 
berry as soon as y^ Boat comes down which is that 
place I suppose you would have it tho: I in haste &c 
forgot to ask you. 

2iCol. Thomas Ashby buried 5 Nov., 1750.— See St. Thomas Regr.— 
He was a son of John Ashby, the 2nd Cacique, by his wife Constantia 
Broughton, and consequently a first cousin of Capt. Nathaniel Broughton. 

22Thomas Ashby, son of Col. Thomas Ashby, married 18 Dec, 1750, 
Margaret Henrietta Bonneau, daughter of Anthony Bonneau and Mar- 
gret Henrietta, born Horry, and grand daughter of Capt. Anthony Bon- 
neau. Note 15. See St. Thomas Regr. 

2 3 Andrew Broughton of StafFord, son of Andrew Broughton of Seaton. 
He married Ann. His will, dated 7 June, 1779, proved 11 April, 1783. 
Her will dated 12 Dec, 1788, proved 9 June, 1789. 

2 4Alexander Broughton, second son of Capt. Nathaniel, married 
Mary Jones, the widow of Maurice Keating. 

2 5From Murrav's Dictionary — 3, Florence, a kind of wine brought 
from Florence. . '. . Obsolete. Cf. 20 Nov., 1757, H. Walpole, letter 
to Mann — "The chest of Florence . . . proves to be Lord Hertford's 
drams." 



186 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

I shall Inclose this to M' Bondfield to forward where 
you are 

Remains me as ever 

Dear Sir 
your affectionate Cousin 
and Hum^'i" Serv°' 

Tho^ Reaston 
P. S. My Bro*" Peter is well and Desires his Due 
Remembrances to you. 

P. S. pray when you write ocf Rinde make 

my due Respects acceptable to him. 



[From J E Bondfield] 

[Addressed:] To 

Nathaniel Broughton Esq 
at Mulberry 
S° CaroHna 

Hull y" 22 May 1751 
Dear S" 

its with the outmost concearn that I write to you at 
this time as it is on So malloncolly a subject I doubt 
not but M*" Alex"" Broughton has acquainted you there- 
with to whom I advisd on y^ unhappy affair I would at 
that time have wrote to y"" self but as it was of so tender 
anature and being too well asurd how an affair of that 
kind must affect you was oblidg** to omitt it. I have a 
sensable concear for all y^ family & ^ larly your self 
to be deprived of a son of so many valuable qualifica- 
tion his being at this place about six month dureing 
which we was constantly together that I had contracted 
such a friendship with him and his y^ same 

regard for him as a brother & no relation for a Course 
of years has given me so much uneasyness as his death 
I shall ever have a value for his memory & true regard 
to any of the family tho I am a Distant relation by 
Marrage & unknown to any of them, it will yeald 
me secreat satisfaction to hear from any thats 
related to my good Deces** friend I shall never have 
pleasure to be personally acquainted with you its 



BROUGHTON LETTERS 187 

being at such a distance but I have some young branches 
of which Poor M"" Broughton was very fond of some of 
y™ may ^haps reach y*" parts to pay a Visitt to y^ 
family 

I was much out of health when I wrote M"" Alex*^ 
Broughton that it would not ^mitt me to Enlarge at 
that time on so malloncolly a subject was therefore 
oblidge to omitt ^lars. 

I mentioned then that y^ small Pox was what 
occationd the unhappy Circumstance — he had some 
Intervall of his old disorder while with me but other- 
way Injoyd a better state of health than had before 
he left you the Docf had attended him Great Part of 
y^ winter on that ace'' & likewise to prepare him for 
Enoculation as he was determined to go under the 
operation by which he hop"^ of haveing them favourable 
I would gladly prevaild on him to have put it of but he 
was so bent upon it that no perswation could devert 
him from it he was as I observ'^ above Enoculated by 
Doc"" Chambers our ableest Phisision & hop'^ to have 
y*' favourablely but unhappily he was greatly Loaded 
which struck such a damp upon his sperritts as would 
never give an opertunity for them to come to there 
proper height which I am perswaid was in some measure 
y*" occation of y* fatall consiquence. tho we are too 
ready to blame some cause or other when the hand of 
Providence calls, which we must Submitt to in y^ 
best manner we are able but a loss of this kind cant be 
got over without concearn. 

M"^ Broughton never mentiond to me any intention 
of making his will nor did I think it adviseable to give 
y^ least hint of that kind as Emotion of that sort must 
have affect*^ him greatly in his condition I wrote to 
Co" Broughton at London and other Relation in the 
Contry when I thought him in Dainger M""^ Bondfield 
was by him constantly at y*" time of ther height & 
y^ day & Night before his Death he had some favourable 
simptoms of Doing well as they was then turning & 
we all hope'* of geting through them & the Docf was 
then in some hopes but a sudden alteration happ** 



188 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

which I suppose is common in those cases y^ matter 
fell upon his Lungs and carried him suddenly of to 
our great surpriz and concearn 

M"^ P"" Acklome^^ was from home & Co" Th' Acklome 
lay then very 111 that no relations could be at y^ Funerall 
but M"" Tho^ Acklome son & Daughter, the mannage- 
ment there of was left to me in which I acted in y^ best 
manner I was able he is Lay close by his Aunt Reaston^^ 
in the Body of our Trinity Church I was desired by 
M"" Johnson to Transmitt a coppy of the Sundry Dis- 
bur* to M"" Newberry in London which I have done 
accordingly & Doubt not but y*" same will be sent over 
I shall be glad to hear you & rest of relation Injoy a 
Perfect State of health M""^ Bondfield Joyn's me in our 
best respects to yourself & family & what other rela- 
tion in Carolina 

I am D"" S' y' most hum'" Ser* 

J F. Bondfield 



[From Capt. Thomas Reaston] 

[Addressed: ] To 

Nath* Broughton Bsq"" 
att 
Mulberry 

London y" 2°^ July 1751 
Dear Brother — 

1 wrote you y^ 30^ of April last under Cover to 
Cousin Alex"^ by my Pilot; which hope you receiv'd. 
and now Embrace this first Opportunity to advise you 
of our safe Arrival here y^ 18^ Ult° when soon after 
I had y*" satisfaction to hear of all Relations on this 
side y^ water being well, save my Dear Cousin Broughton 

2 6Peter Acklom was apparently a son of Alethia Acklom, a sister of 
Hon. Thomas Broughton; and so was possibly Thomas Acklom, of whom, 
however, we have no other mention. Peter Acklom married Elizabeth 
Heathcote granddaughter of Sir John Rodes, 3rd Bart, of Barlborough, 
(See Burke's Commoners) and lived at Hornsea, where Peter Manigault 
visited him, in 1752. See this Magazine, vol. XV, p. 123. 

2 7from the context of these letters, "his Aunt Reaston" seems to be 
the deceased wife of Capt. Thomas Reaston, and a daughter of Hon. 
Thomas Broughton. 



BROUGHTON LETTERS 189 

whose Death you will be advis'd of before these and 
am sensibly affected with the Concern it must give to 
you and all friends in Carolina as it has been and is 
to me, and all his Relations and friends that had the 
pleasure to know him here; but we must (as daily 
Experience teaches us we aught) submit to the Divine 
Desposer of all things: and rest assured that nothing 
was v/anting to preserve him here: I doubt not but 
you will be advis'd of his being Enoculated by his 
desire which opperation was perform'd by as Eminent 
a Physicition as any in practice allowed; but as to any 
particulars I have not yet heard but soon shall and then 
by Next Opportunity will advise you. 

I the other day waited on Aunt Broughton and gave 
her your letter when she was well and desired when 
I wrote you to present y^ tender of her Due Remem- 
brance to you and all friends in Carolina. 

Cap*' Scott Arriv'd at Cowes soon after my Arrival 
here when we had Advice CoU^ Blake^^ died on Board 
him soon after he left Carolina 

I forwarded your letter to M" Doggitt but as yet 

have not heard from her I also gave the Letters that 

came by me for Cousin Broughton to M*" Newerry 

[Sic ] who saith will send them back to Carolina as 

I advised. 

1 donot know of anything at presant I can advise 
you of and as this vessel Intends to sail tomorrow must 
Conclude in tender of mine & Brothers Due Remem- 
brance to you and all friends in Carolina who am 

Dear Sir 

your Affec* Bro"" 

and most Hum'^ Serv"*' 
Tho^ Reaston 
P. S. 

As it will be a very great pleasure to me to hear 
from you at all times hope you'l afford me it. You may 
direct for me at M'' Isaac Storrs Merch"* in Marke 
Lane — London 

2 8Col. Joseph Blake, son of Govr. Joseph Blake, the Lord Proprietor. 
See 5. C. Hist. & Gen. Mag., vol. I, p. 159. 



190 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

[From IVf Peter Acklom] 

[Addressed:] To 

Nath" Broughton Esq'' 
at 

Mullberry 
S° Carolina 

Hornsea, Septb'' 3, 1752 
Dear Cos"! 

It is ever a perticular satisfaction to hear of my 
worthy Fr*^^ & Relations in Carolina but thy obligeing 
Fav"" of May y" 6^^ ^ Capt° Reaston affected me with 
some concern as it mentions leaving Thee in a bad state 
of health I hope time w^ y^ favourable season may have 
remov'd those complaints w''*' I sincerely wish & shall 
be truly glad to hear of. 

1 doubt not of Cos" Rob' Johnson's duely adviseing 
Our Fr'*^ in y"" parts of Good Aunt Lydia Broughton's 
death who was confin'd for above two months by a 
gentle decay & as I am inform 'd pass'd of much re- 
gretted by y^ whole circle of her Fr*^^ and acquaintance 
& it's no small satisfaction to those who remain to 
find she hath left so amiable a cheracter w** I heartily 
wish wee may use all diligence to copy after. 

Upon our coming here from Derbyshire about a 
month ago Aunt Acklom inform 'd me of M"" Mani- 
gault^' w*'* a Compan" or two calling here in his way 
to y^ North I was realy sorry at missing y* opportunity 
of seeing a young Gentlem" of such promising hopes 
& y^ offspring of so valuable a Fr'^ & Relation to whom 
I certainly owe high obligations on my Nephew Reas- 
ton 's acco* 

As we didn't remove from Derbyshire into this 
Quart"" till near 6 weeks after Capt" Reaston's arrival 
at Hull I have had y^ opportunity of but little of his 
Comp'' here and not being able to settle his Affairs in 
Engl"^ time enough to return w''^ his vessell have this 
day rec'^ an acco* y* he proposes to dispatch her from 

2 9See S. C. Hist. & Gen. Mag., vol. XV, p. 123, for Mr. Peter Mani- 
gault's account of this visit. 



BROUGHTON LETTERS 191 

Hull in a day or two w*^ obliges mee to send this away 
in much hurry being unwilHng to miss y^ conveyance 
of offering my best wishes and sincere acknowledgm*^. 
Wee desire our perticular Respects may be accept- 
able to Our Relations in general & please to believe mee 
w*^ true Esteem — 

Dear Cos"! 

Thy ObHg'd Fr^ 

& very affect*^ Kinsm" 
P Acklom 



[From M" Anne Gibbes ] 

[Addressed:] To 

Nath*' Broughton 

Esq" 

these 

June the 13: 1753 
at night 
Dear Bro"" 

I am glad to hear all is prety well with you and that 
my people is better, I bless God we are the same hear, 
the little one at Dorchester has been out of order but 
is better, the gentlemen got all well home late upon 

night, they went 6 or 8 miles beyond Edisto 

and meet no Indians, my son got home to-day from 
Combe, he says there's been Indians seen about pon- 
pon and stono,^° there was 6 at a mans hous but left 
there guns without the gate, and came unarm'd and 
askt for victuals, he gave 'em some and sent to the 
commander of the Company but before there could 
be any men got they was gon, they say they are Chare- 
kees but no body believes 'em for they speek English 
very well, Ned got up to Combe last Munday was a 
week he was at his work yesterday when my son came 

3 0The appearance of Northern Indians in the Province is spoken of 
in the newspapers about the date of this letter. From Gazette of 18 
June, 1753 — "This day some Northern Indians, lately taken and brought 
to Town by Capt. David Godin's Company of Militia; they call them- 
selves Savannahs or Schawanoes, and say they live on the Ohio River," 
&c., &c. "Soon clear the country of these French and Northern Indians 
that have for some years past infested this Province." 



192 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

away he never came to his master as he went up and 
wont own that he has been down but about the woods 
up there, I should been glad to have heard how poor 
bob is Cate says she sent yesterday to let my sister 
know she was to come down to-day, if she had my 
letter she told the boy she had none but to tell me they 
was all well we Joyn in Duty love and Service as due 
I am 

Dear Bro"" your afft sister 
Anne Gibbes^^ 
Cate tells me they want a few milkpans and she 
hears there's some at the Corner^^ please get some if 
theres any there 
the Cokroch eat this last night [scale] 



From D' WilHam Rind] 

[Addressed:] To 

Nath'' Broughton Esq"" 
at Mulberry 
S° Carolina 

lyivelands 1 Aug* 1753 
Hon^ Sir 

Your last was by favour of M' Watson since which 
I have wrote you by three different opportunities 
(all which I hope came safe to hand) acquainting you 
with my wellfair but not hearing from you for these 
twelve months by past I began to be afraid you had 
been indispos'd till M"" Watson wrote me he had lately 
heard from you I should be glad when your health will 
permitt you would lett me know how you and family 
keeps their health wich will always give me singular 
satisfactione to hear off. I have now the pleasure 

31 Anne Gibbes was a daughter of Hon. Thomas Broughton and the 
widow of John Gibbes, Esq. Her husband was the son of Col. John 
Gibbes, to whom there is a mural tablet on the east wall of the Goose 
Creek Church. Mrs. Gibbes' two daughters married, respectively, 
Walter and John Izard, and have left many descendants. See 5. C. Hist. 
&■ Ge7i. Mag., vol. II, pp. 230, 231. 

3 2Monck's Corner, a village which was a considerable trading centre 
for that section. See map accompanying account of "The F'airlawn 
Barony," by Hon. H. A. M. Smith, S. C. Hist. & Gen. Mag., vol. IX 
page 193. 



BROUGHTON LETTERS 193 

of acquainting you that my wife was safely delivered 
of a son the 12 past who was baptized the 15 by the 
name of James Nath" after his grandfathers & you 
who has always proved a most kind and affectionate 
father to me so I felt myself bound in duty to add your 
name. She I thank God is perfectly recovered and 
desires her Compliments may be made most accepta- 
ble to you & family & is most sincerely join'd by Hon'''^ 
Sir 

your most Dut: & ob. son 
Will: Rind'' 
[Endorsed ] Doct : Rind. 



[From Capt. Thomas Reaston ] 

[Addressed: ] To 

Nath'' Broughton Esq"" 
at 

Mulberry 

Hull y^ 20*^ Octo'^'" 1753 
Dear Bro"^ 

I wrote you last on 20*'' Ult° under cover to M*" 
Manigault which with my others I hope would be handed 
you safe to which crave referance, but I have never 
been favour'd with a line from you since I left Caro- 
lina, which has given me no small concern for you 
health with y^ rest of my friends in Carolina untill 
of late M"" Manigault advised me that all my friends 
there was well amongst which I hope you was included, 
and as I am not conscious of haveing given any just 
cause for being deprived Corresponding with one I 
so much esteem so I am at a loss how to account or 
atone properly for it, which I should with pleasure do 
by any means in my power for y"" Facilitating of w'^'' 
I hope my Dear Bro"" will fav" me with a few lines as 
soon as convenient advising me of his and all my dear 
friends Welfares, which will ever be a great pleas" to 

3 3 Dr. William Rind married Anne, daughter of Capt. Nathaniel 
Broughton. See will of Susannah Lansac (1749) "to cousin Anne Rind, 
wife of Dr. Rind of Charles Town." 



194 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

me who you may direct for in Hull, where in my last 
I advised you of my Progress in making a Second 
Choice of a dear Companion, which will I hope be 
Compleated in a few days as y^ House is just Finished 
for us to live in, where I should be very glad to see any 
of my Carolina friends. 

This Conveyance just offering in y^ Brewing season I 
send thereby to y^ Care of M"" Manigault a Cask of 
Ale which I wish may prove good and begg you'l accept 
y^ Same with the tender of my Affect*"^ love to you & 
sister Gibbes^* with all other my friends as due from 
Dear Bro"" 

yours very Affectionately 
and Most Hum*''" Serv°* 
Tho' Reaston 
P. S. 

I have y* pleasure to advise you all friends here are 
well as I much hope these will meet you all. 
Pray my Complim*^ to M" La Tour. 



[From Charles Pinckney Esq ] 
To Nathaniel Broughton Esq'' 
at the Mulberry in 
S° Carohna 
By Cap* Hunt 

London Aug* V 1754 
Dear Sir 

I duely reced your favours and power Att^ from 
yourself and Mrs Gibbes to me and Mr Watsone ag* 
Mr Johnson which I should sooner have acknowledge^ 
the receipt of but that I waited to do it 'till I had so 
settled the affair as to be able to acquaint you of my 
success therein which I can now with pleasure do, as 
after passing several letters between M"" Johnson and 
myself we have brot it to a conclusion and I have 
recvd from him and paid over to M"" Watson according 
to your orders to me £573 Ster^ on yours, M" Gibbes 
and Miss Monck's^^ accounts which I hope will prove 

34See note 31. 

3 5 Daughter of Thomas Monck by his 1st wife, Joanna Broughton. 



BROUGHTON LETTERS 195 

satisfactory to you, And had I powers from the rest of 
the Legatees in CaroHna I could have recvd their money 
also at the Same time And if they send me their proper 
powers as you did by the first ship that sails after 
this reaches your hands I doubt not to receive and send 
on their money soon after their powers come to hand. 
The other powers wanted are from the Bx'ors or Trustees 
of M" Dwight.^' The Bx'ors of Col. Tho^ Ashby." 
The Bx'ors of M^^ Hassell.'' Col: Lejeau'' in right of 
his wife, and M"" Manigault*" in right of his wife. 

The whole Bstate of M""" Christiana Broughton,*^ 
after payment of Debts and Legacies amounted to 

£8232, of which one half was devised to her sister 
Lydia*^ absolutely and the use of the other half during 
her life, and after her death that half was to be divided 
into 2 parts one of which she directed should go to M.' 
Johnson, and the other to her nephews & nieces the 
Children of her Brother and Sisters Tho^ Broughton, 
Mary Chamberlayn, Althea Aclom, and Constantia 
Ashby, that should be living at the time of her death 
to be equally divided between them share and share 
alike, which were 14, in number 9, in Carolina and 5, 
in Bngland, so that the quarter part of £8232 being 
£2058, to be divided into 14, shares, came to £147 
each, on which we got interest allowed from the time 
of M""^ Lydia Broughton 's death which came to £9 on 
each share and that makes £156 for principal and 
interest. M" Lydia Broughton by her will about 2 

3 6Christiana Broughton, daughter of Hon. Thomas Broughton, was 
married on 17th Jan., 1731/2, to Rev. Daniel Dwight. See S. C. Gazette 
of 22 Jan., 1731/2. Salley's Marriage Notices, p. 5. 

3 7See note 21. 

3 8Elizabeth Ashby, daughter of John Ashby and Constantia (bom) 
Broughton, married Revd. Thomas Hasell, 21 Jan., 1714-5. See St Thomas 
Regr. 

39 (Col.) Francis Lejau married 14 April, 1726, Mary Ashby, daughter 
of John and Constantia Ashby. 

40See note 8. 

41 Christiana and Lydia Broughton were unmarried sisters of Hon. 
Thomas Broughton, who apparently never came to America. The death 
of Christiana Broughton was advised to Capt. Nathaniel Broughton by 
Robert Johnson in his letter received 2 May, 1744 (See p. 183). Mr. 
Peter Manigault attended in London the funeral of Miss Lydia Broughton, 
who died on 28th May, 1750. See page 1 16 of last number of this Maga- 
zine. 



196 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

years ago, gives the Bulk of what she had to M' John- 
son, and only a legacy of £100 to you. (Mr Johnson 
assigns a particular reason for her conduct in this 
matter) which I have recvd with £5 for Int. thereon, 
so that your part of the £573, which I paid to M"" 
Watsone is 261, and the £156, to M'" Gibbes and the 
£156 for Miss Monck makes up that sum. thus Sir 
I have endeavourd to acquit my self in the power you 
intrusted me with with the utmost care and despatch 
and benefit to your Interest and hope it will prove 
to your Satisfaction. You mention in your first letter 
that you had sent me 4 coins of gold amounting to about 
7 guineas but as I was come away from Charles Town 
before that came to hand I suppose you had it Carried 
back to you because I never recvd it. I am 

Sir with due Compliments to all your good family 
your most Obed* hble serv'^ 

C^ Pinckney 
I send you M*" Watsons rect. he will pay me my 
charges in the affair 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES SANTEE. 



1758-1788. 
Copied by Mabel L. Webber. 

{Continued from the July Number.) 



41. I^ewis Miles of this Parish, Bachelor, and Ann Sim- 
mons of this Parish, Spinster, were married at the 
DwelUng-house of George Simmons of this Parish, 
by Licence, this Fourth Day of April in the year of 
our Lord 1765, by me S. F. Warren Rector of this 
Parish. 

This marriage was \ Lewis Miles 

solemnized between us J Ann Simmons 
In the Presence of W™ Roberts 

Moses Miles 

42. William Bell of this Parish, Widower and Ehza- 
beth Anderson of this Parish, widow, were married 
at the Dwelling house of the Re'vd Sam'l Fenner 
Warren of this Parish, by Lycence this Eight Day of 
May in the Year of our Lord 1765, by me S. F. 
Warren, Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was 1 W™ Bell 

solemnized between us J Elis. Anderson 
In the presence of Alex. Miot 

W^ Roberts. 

43. Elias Ball of the Parish of St. Johns, Bachelor and 
Catherine Gaillard of this Parish, Spinster were 
married in the Dwelling-House of Theodore Gail- 
lard of this Parish, by Licence this Fourteenth Day 
of May in the Year of our Lord 1765, by me S. F. 
Warren, Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was \ Elias Ball 

solemnized between us J Cath. Gaillard 
In the Presence of Floride Peyre. 

Samuel Gaillard. 



198 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

44. Robert Morris of this Parish, Bachelor, and 
Elizabeth Jenner of this Parish Spinster, were mar- 
ried in the Dwelling-house of James Halsey of this 
Parish by Licence, this Twenty-Seventh Day of 
June in the Year of our Lord 1765, by me S. F. War- 
ren, Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was 1 Robert Morris X his mark 

Solemnized between us J Elizabeth Jenner X her mark 
In the Presence of James Halsey 

francis Halsey. 

45. Daniel Dubose of the Parish of Christ Church, 
Bachelor, and Frances Simons of the Parish of Christ 
Church, widow, were married at the Plantation of 
Henry Lawrence Esq., in this Parish by Licence, 
this Eleventh Day of November in the Year of our 
Lord 1766, by me S. F. Warren Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was \ Dan^* Dubose 

Solemnized between us J Frances Simons 
In thePresence of Isaac Legare 

demons Brown 

46. Aaron Littell of the Parish of St. Thomas, Bachelor, 
and Elizabeth Jennens of the Parish of St. Thomas 
Spinster, were married in the Dwelling-house of 
Mary Jennens, of this Parish, widow, by Licence 
this Twenty-Seventh Day of November in the Year 
of our Lord 1766, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of 
this Parish. 

This marriage was \ Aaron Littell 

solemnized between us J Elizabeth Jennens 
In the Presence of John Barnett 

John Jennens. 

47. James CoUadon of this Parish Widower and 
Martha Fleming of this Parish, were married in 
the Dwelling-house of John Marion, of this Parish, 
by Licence, this Twenty Ninth Day of December 
in the Year of our Lord 1766, by me S. F. Warren 
Rector of this Parish. 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES SANTEE 199 

This marriage was \ James CoUadon 

Solemnized between us j Martha Fleming 
In the Presence of Peter Guerry 

Jacob Jeanneret. 

48. John Jennens of this Parish, Bachelor, and Martha 
Murrell of the Parish of Christ Church, Spinster, 
were married in the DwelHng-house of Mary Jennens, 
of this Parish, Widower, by Licence this Fifteenth 
Day of January in the Year of our Lord, 1767, by 
me S. F. Warren Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was 1 John Jennens 

Solemnized between us J Martha Murrell X her mark 

In the Presence of Aaron Littell 

Charles Maynard. 

49. William Lewis of this Parish, Bachelor, and Ann 
Murrell of this Parish, Spinster, were married in 
the Dwelling-house of Thomas Pacy of this Parish, 
by Licence this Fourteenth Day of May in the Year 
of our Lord 1767 by me S. F. Warren, Rector of this 
Parish. 

This marriage was \ William Lewis 

Solemnized between us j Ann Murrell X her mark 
In the Presence of Ja^ Halsey 

S Lewis. 

50. Childermas Croft of the Parish of Prince Fred- 
erick, Bachelor and, Mary Simmons of this Parish, 
Spinster, were married in the Dwelling-house of 
George Simmons of this Parish, by Licence this 
Twenty Eight Day of May in the Year of our Lord 
1767, by me S. F. Warren Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was 1 Childermas Croft. 

Solemnized between us J Mary Simmons 
In the Presence of Peter Mouzon 

Jo" Barnett. 

51. Robert Morrison of the Parish of St. Thomas, 
Bachelor, and Rebecca Spencer of this Parish, Spinster 
were married in this Parish, by Banns, this Twenty- 



200 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

fifth Day of June in the Year of our Lord 1767, by me 

S. F. Warren, Kector of this Parish. 
This marriage was 1 Robert Morrison 

Solemnized between us J Rebecca Spencer X her mark. 
In the Presence of Jos : Spencer 

Lydia Perdriau. 

52. Capers Boone of the Parish of Prince-George, 
Widower, and Mary Smith of the Parish of Prince- 
George, widow, were married in the DwelUng-house 
of Paul Lepear of the Parish of Prince-George, by 
Licence, this Sixteenth Day of July in the Year of 
our Lord, 1767, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of St. 
James Santee. 

This marriage was ~[ Capers Boone 

Solemnized between us J Mary Smith 
In the Presence of Paul Lepear 

]° Atchison 

53. John Monk of the Parish of St. Stephens, Bachelor 
and Magdalen Boineau of this Parish Spinster were 
married in the Dwelling-house of Mich'l Boineau 
of this Parish, Widow 'r by Licence this Twentieth 
Day of October in the Year of our Lord, 1767, by me, 
S. F. Warren, Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was 1 John Monk 

Solemnized between us J Magdalene Boineau 
In the Presence of Tho^ Boone Jun"" 

Isaac Rembert. 

54. John Smith of the Parish of Prince-George, Bache- 
lor, and Elizabeth Bacot of Prince-George Parish, 
Spinster, were married in the Dwelling house of 
Elias Foissin, of the Parish of Prince-George by 
Licence, this Eleventh Day of February in the Year 
of our Lord, 1768, by me S. F. Warren Rector of 
the Parish of St. James Santee. 

This marriage was \ Jn° Smith 

Solemnized between us J EHzabeth Bacot. 
In the Presence of EHas Foissin 

Sam' Bacot. 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES SANTEE 201 

55. Daniel M*^Gregor of this Parish, widower and 
Susannah Laurense of this Parish, Spinster, were 
married in the Dwelling-house of Richard Withers, 
of this Parish, by lyicence, this Twenty-fifth Day of 
February in the Year of our Lord, 1768, by me S. 
F. Warren, Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was 1 Daniel M'^Gregor 

Solemnized between us J Susannah Laurens 
In the Presence of James Bell 

Alexand"" M'^Gregor 

56. Francis Roach of the Parish of St. Thomas, Bache- 
lor and Mary Jennens of this Parish, Spinster, were 
married in the Dwelling house of the Rev'd Samuel 
Fenner Warren of this Parish, by Licence, this 
Seventeenth Day of April in the Year of our Lord, 
1768, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was 1 Fran^ Roche 

Solemnized between us J Mary Jennens 
In the Presence of Aaron Littell. 

Samuel Littell. 

57. Jacob Bonhoste of the Parish of Prince-George, 
widower and Hannah Sullivan of the Parish of 
Prince-George, Spinster, were married in the Dwell- 
ing-house of Mark Huggins of the Parish of Prince- 
George, by Licence, this Twenty first Day of April, 
in the Year of our Lord, 1768, by me, S. F. Warren 
Rector of James Santee [sic ] 

This marriage was \ Jacob Bonhoste 

Solemnized between us J Hannah Sullivan X her mark. 
In the Presence of Anna Huggins 

Esther Sullivan. 

58. James Bell of this Parish, widower and Esther 
Chovin of this Parish, Spinster, were married in the 
Dwelling-house of William Bell in the Parish of 
Prince George, by Licence, this Twenty Third Day 
of May in the Year of our Lord, 1768, by me S. F. 
Warren Rector of this Parish. 



202 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 



This marriage was \ James Bell 

Solemniz'd between us J Esther Chovin 
In the Presence of W™ Mathews 

W" Bell. 

59. John Gaillard of this Parish, Bachelor, and Su- 
sanna Boone of this Parish, Spinster, were married 
in the Dwelling-house of Thomas Boone, of this 
Parish, by Licence, this Tenth Day of November in 
the Year of our Lord, 1768, by me S. F. Warren 
Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was "I John Gaillard Jr. 

Solemniz'd between us J Susannah Boone 
In the Presence of Thos Boone Junr. 

Cha' Gaillard. 

60. Bartholomew Gaillard of this Parish, Bachelor, 
and Elizabeth Webb of this Parish, Spinster were 
married in the Dwelling-house of Elizabeth Webb, 
of this Parish, by Licence, this Nineteenth Day of 
February in the Year of our Lord, 1769, by me S. F. 
Warren, Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was \ Barth™ Gaillard 

Solemnized between us J Elizabeth Webb 
In the Presence of Peter Mouzon 

Frances Bochet. 



61. William Matthews of the Parish of Prince-George, 
widower, and Esther SulUvan of the Parish of Prince- 
George, Spinster, were married at the Plantation of 
Coll: Shingleton, in the Parish of Prince-George, by 
Licence, this Twenty-Fifth Day of April, in the Year 
of our Lord, 1769, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of 
this Parish. 

This marriage was \ W™ Mathews 

Solemnized between us J Hester Sullivan 
In the Presence of W™ Bell 

Joseph Sullivan 

62. Paul Trapier Esq. of the Parish of Prince-George, 
Widower, and Elizabeth Waties of the Parish of 
Prince George, Widow, were married at the Parish 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES SANTEE 203 

Church of Prince George, by Licence, this Twenty- 
First Day of May, in the Year of our Lord, 1767, 
by me, S. F. Warren, Rector of St. James Santee. 

This marriage was 1 Paul Trapier 

Solemnized between us J KHz: Waties 

In the Presence of Job Rothmahler 

Jos. Dubourdieu. 

63. Jacobus CalHon, of the Parish of Prince George, 
Widower, and Margaret Waller, of the Parish of 
Prince George, Widow were married at the Dwell- 
ing-house of the Revd. S. F. Warren, of this Parish, 
by Licence, this Ninth Day of July, in the Year of 
our Lord, 1769, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of this 
Parish. 

This marriage was 1 Jacobus CoUon 

Solemniz'd between us J Margaret Waller 
In the Presence of Alexander [undecipherable ] 

Benj° Perdriau. 

64. William Henry Mills, of the Parish of Allsaints, 
widower, and Elizabeth M'^Gomery, of the Parish of 
Allsaints, Spinster, were married in the Dwelling- 
house of Joseph AUston, of the Parish of Allsaints, 
by Licence, this Twenty Second Day of July, in the 
Year of our Lord, 1769, by me S. F. Warren, Rector 
St. James Santee. 

This marriage was 1 W" H^ Mills. 

Solemnized between us J Elizabeth Montgomery 
In the Presence of Joseph Alston, 

And'' Johnston. 

(To be continued.) 



IINDBX 



Abercromby, Mr., 115. 

Acklom, Mrs., 190. 

Acklom, Aithea, 184, 188. 

Acklom, Peter, 188, 190, 191. 

Acklom, Col. Thomas, 188. 

Adams, Martha, 102. 

Alason, Rev. (a Dissenting Minister), 

47. 
Almanacs, (S. C), 73-81. 
Alston, Joseph, 203. 
Amelia by Fielding, 122. 
Amys, Thomas, 91. 
Anderson, Elizabeth, 197. 
Anderson, James, 133, 136. 
Anderson, Jean, 142. 
Anderson, John, 124. 
Anderson, Joseph, 136. 
Anger, Anne, 45, 46. 
Anger, Joseph, 43, 45, 46. 
Anger, Sarah, 45, 46. 
Armstrong, Col., 83, 131, 167. 
Ash, John, 43. 
Ash Hill plantation, 8 
Ashby, Mrs, 176. 
Ashby, Ann, 115, 178. 
Ashby, Constantia, 184, 185. 
Ashby, EUzabeth, 195. 
Ashby, John, 113, 174, 195. 
Ashby, John, 2d, Casique, 185. 
Ashby, Mary, 195. 
Ashby, Thomas, 115, 185. 
Ashby Arms, 115, 117. 
Ashe, Gen., 56. 
Ashepoo, 71. 

Ashepoo Barony, 63-72, map of, 63. 
Ashley Barony, 152, 154, 155, 
Atchison, Jonah, 140, 142. 
Atchison, Jo., 200. 
Auptin, George, 7. 
Axson, James, 136. 

Backer, [Baker?] Sarah, 50. 
Bacot, Elizabeth, 200. 
Bacot, Samuel, 200. 
Baker, Margaret, 68, 69. 
Baker, Richard, 68, 69. 
Baker, Richard Bohun, 155. 
Baker, Susannah, 165. 
Baker, William, 69. 
Baldy, Cicely, 139. 
Ball, E., 94. 
Ball, Elias, 93, 108, 112, 197. 



Ball, Capt. Elias, 110. 

Ball, John, 11. 

Ball, John Coming, 94, 139. 

Ball, Lydia, 112. 

Ball, WilHam, 153. 

Ball, W J., 110. 

Banbury, Miss, 115. 

Baptists, (Arian or General), 160, 161. 

Baptists (at Stono), 160. 

Baptist Church (First), 159, 160. 

Barker, Benjamin, 125. 

Barnard, James, 139. 

Barnard, Judith, 139. 

Barnett, John, 136, 139, 140, 143, 198, 

199. 
Barnwell, Joseph W., 2, 33. 
Baronies of S. C, 3. 63, 150. 
Barrington, EHzabeth, 13. 
Barton, vSarah, 137. 
Basnett, John, 160. 
Bayley, John, Landgrave, 3-9. 
Bedon, Martha, 47. 
Bedon, Richard, 172. 
Bedon, Col. Richard, 44. 
Beekman, Lt. Col. Barnard, 52. 
Belfield, Allen, 92. 
Belfield, Finney, 92. 
Bell, Capt., 176. 
Bell, James, 142 (2), 201, 202. 
Bell, Joseph, 142. 
Bell, William, 142, 197, 201, 202. 
Bellinger, Anne, 67. 
Bellinger, Edmund, 1st Landgrave, 9-12, 

63-72. 
Bellinger, Edmund, 2d Landgrave, 4, 5, 

10, 11, 66-72. 
Bellinger, Edmund, 3d Landgrave, 70-72. 
Bellinger, EHzabeth, 11, 64, 66, 67, 68, 

69. 
Bellinger, George, 11, 68, 71. 
Bellinger, John, 64, 67, 71. 
Bellinger, Dr. John, 71. 
Bellinger Joseph, 71. 
Bellinger, Lucia, 43, 67. 
Bellinger, Mary, 11. 
Bellinger, Richard, 63. 
BeUinger, Thomas, 10, 11, 66, 69. 
Bellinger, William, 11, 67, 68. 
Belmont plantation, 8. 
Belvidere plantation, 7. 
Berringer, Col. John, 64. 
Berringer, Capt. Jehu, 64. 



INDEX 



205 



Berringer, Mary, 64. 

Bishop, Robert, 64. 

Black, Anne Maria, 50. 

Black, Nathaniel, 50. 

Black Branch plantation, 8. 

Black Jack plantation, 8. 

"Black Robin", 154, 155. 

Black Swamp, Camp at, 82. 

Blake, Mr., 116, 122, 123. 

Blake, Col., 189. 

Blake, Joseph, 189. 

Blake, Mary, 102. 

Blakeway, Mrs., 116. 

Bloodgood, John, 47. 

Bloody Marsh, 171. 

Blue Hole plantation, 8. 

Bochett, Ann, 140. 

Bochett, Henry, 140. 

Bohun, Edmund, 67, 68. 

Bohun, Elizabeth, 68. 

Bohun, Mary, 68, 69. 

Bohun, Nicholas, 67, 68. 

Boineau, E. Madalen, 143. 

Boineau, Magdalen, 200. 

Boineau, Mary, 143. 

Boineau, Michael, 137, 143 (2), 200. 

Bondfield, Mrs., 188. 

Bondfield, J. E., 186, 188. 

Bone, John, 140. 

Boner, Jane, 39. 

Boner, Lucy, 39. 

Bonhoste, Jacob, 139, 201. 

Boisseau, James, 93. 

Boisseau, Jean, 13. 

Boisseau, Mary, 13. 

Bonneau, , 93. 

Bonneau, Anthony, 110, 180, 185. 

Bonneau, John, 97. 

Bonneau, John, Jr., 97. 

Bonneau, Margaret Henrietta, 185. 

Bonneau, Mary, 39. 

Bonneau, William, 39. 

Bonneau's Ferry, 180. 

Boone, Capers, 200. 

Boone, Elizabeth, 141. 

Boone, Suannah, 202. 

Boone, Thomas, 141, 202. 

Boone, Thomas Jr., 200, 202. 

Boone's Barony, 63. 

Booth, Martha, 42. 

Bouchet, Frances, 202, 

Bowen, Owen, 97. 

Bowie, Capt., 169. 

Bowler, Charles, 43, 46, 47, 48, 49. 

Bowler, Elizabeth, 46, 47, 48, 49. 

Bowler, Francis, 48, 49. 

Boy den, Daniel, 104 (2) 

Boyden, John, 104 (2). 

Brackey plantation, 78. 

Brail sford, Mrs., 115. 



Brailsford, Dr. William Moultrie, 17. 

Branford, Anne, 50. 

Brandford, William, 97. 

Brevard, Col., 54, 55. 

Brewton, Mr., 22. 

Brewton house, 144. 

Brewton Miles, 144. 

Briar Creek, 56, 57. 

Broughton, Miss, 116. 

Broughton, Alexander, 181, 185. 

Broughton, Andrew, 110, 171, 174, 176, 

180. 
Broughton, Andrew, of Stafford, 185. 
Broughton, Ann, 153, 171, 172, 176, 185, 

193. 
Broughton, Charlotte, 178, 179-180. 
Broughton, Christiana, 171, 195. 
Broughton, Constantia, 171, 174. 
Broughton, Henrietta Charlotte, 172, 181. 
Broughton, Johanna, 171,174, 194. 
Broughton, Lydia, 184, 195. 
Broughton, Mary, 183. 
Broughton, Nathaniel, 109, 171-196. 
Broughton, Sir Nathaniel, 171. 
Broughton, Robert, 171,172. 
Broughton, Thomas, 109, 171-196. 
Broughton, Thomas Jr., 180-181. 
Broughton Letters, 171-196. 
Brown, Clemons, 198. 
Brown, Edward, 42. 
Brown, W., 95. 
Brush Pond plantation, 8. 
Bryan, Nicholas, 134. 
Budd, John S., 53, 82. 
Bull, Benjamin William, 102. 
Bull, Burnaby, 11, 67. 
Bull, Sarah, 102, 103. 
Bull, Thomas, 102, 103. 
Bull, William, 154. 
Bullivane, John, 96. 
Bulloch, Joseph G., 69. 
Burden, Kinsey, 144. 
Buretel, Mrs., 174, 175. 
Burke, R., 53. 
Bush, Lieutenant, 163. 
Butler, Capt., 175. 
Butler, Gen., 169. 
Butler, Elizabeth, 11, 70, 71. 
Butler, Esther, 70, 71. 
Butler, Hugh, 172. 
Butler, Capt. Lewis, 163. 
Butler, Richard, 159. 
Butler, Shem, 11, 70, 71. 
Butler, Thomas, 1 1 . 

Cabanis, Jane, 179. 
Cahusac, Peter, 182. 
Cains, John, 138. 
Cains, Mary, 138. 
Caldwell, William, 86, 124. 



206 



INDEX 



Chamberlain, Mary, 184. 

Chambers, Dr., 187. 

Cantey, Charles, 16, 17. 

Cantey, Harriet, 17. 

Capers, Richard, 94. 

Carnes, Patrick, 163. 

Carries, Susannah, 163. 

Caro, Peter, 47. 

Case, Joseph, 

Cattell, Arthur, 44. 

Cattell, Benjamin, 50, 89, 104 (2), 105. 

Cattell, John, 99, 102, 103. 

Cattell, Lydia, 104 (2). 

Cattell, Margaret, 99. 

Cattell, Mary, 104 (2). 

Cattell, Sarah, 101. 

Cattell, William, 44, 103, 105. 

Cattell, William Jr., 44, 50, 160. 

Cavanagh, Dr. James, 16. 

Champanare, Esther, 136. 

Chapman, Eleanor, 39. 

Chapman, Mary, 39. 

Chapman, Rebecca, 43. 

Chapman, William, 39. 

Chastaigner, Alexandre de, 179. 

Chastaigner, Catherine de, 179. 

Chastaigner de Lisle, Mrs. Alexandre 

Thesee, 174. 
Chastaigner de Lisle, Henrietta Charlotte, 

174. 
Chee-Ha, 70. 
Cheves, Langdon, 2, 172. 
Chicken, Catherine, 112, 140. 
Chicken, George, 112, 174. 
Chicken, Lydia, 112. 
Chicken, WiUiam, 138. 
Child, Elizabeth, 112. 
Child, Hannah, 111. 
Child, Isaac, 107, 111, 112. 
Child, James, 107-112. 
Child, Lydia, 11, 112. 
Child, Margaret, 112. 
Child, Mary, 112. 
Child, Sarah, HI, 112. 
Child, William, 111, 112. 
Childsbury, 107-112, map, 107, fair, 110, 

free school, 109. 
Chovin, Elizabeth, 138. 
Chovin, Esther, 139, 201, 202. 
Clark, Capt., 118. 
Clay Hill plantation, 157. 
Cleveland, John B., 2. 
Clieland, Dr., 180. 
Club No. 45, 26, 27. 
Cockran, Michael, 141, 113 (2), 134. 
Codner, Grace, 43. 
Coffin, James, 103, 104. 
Coffin, Sidney, 104. 
Coffin, Susannah Wilson, 104. 
Colcock, C. J., 2. 



Colladon, James, 198-199. 

Colleton, John, 92. 

Colleton, Sir John, will of, 91, 92. 

Colleton, Robert, 91, 92. 

Colleton, Susannah, 92. 

Collins, Ann, 91, 92. 

Collins, Jonah, 140. 

Collins, John, 91. 

Collon, Jacobus, 203. 

Congregational Church at Dorchester, 153. 

Connely, Judith, 50. 

Conyers, Doctor, 175. 

Cooper, Rev. 97, 101, 102. 

Cooper, John, 154, 155, 164, 165. 

Corbett, Mrs., 114. 117. 

Corbett, Thomas, 94, 113, 114, 116, 117, 

118, 119, 120. 
Cordes, Ann, 145. 
Cordes, Isaac, 145. 
Cordes, John, 92, 145, 147. 
Cordes, Mary, 145. 
Cordes, Thomas, 94, 145, 146. 
Cordes, Capt, Thomas, 110. 
Country Club, 157. 
Crab, Oyburn, 86. 
Cramahi, Mr., 115. 
Craven, Lord, 9. 
Craven, Charles, 155, 164, 165. 
Cree, George, 50. 
Croft, Childermas, 199. 
Croft, Robert, 141. 
Crook. Elizabeth, 138. 
Crosthwaite, Capt., 117, 119. 
Crowfield plantation, 64, 95. 
Cruger, Nicholas, 153. 
Cummings, John, 137. 
Gushing, Thomas, 29. 
CutlifFe, Thomas, 165. 

Daniel's Island, 65. 

Dart' Mr., 22. 

Dart, Benjamin, 29. 

Davis, Capt. H., 52, 84, 85. 

Davis, William, 125. 

Dawshee plantation, 8. 

Deas, Miss Anne, 107, 108. 

Delahowe, Dr., 43. 

De Lesseline, John, 138. 

Deloney, Arthur, 103. 

Dennis, Lawrence, 159. 

Dering, Dr. Cholmondley, 40, 44, 47. 

Dering, Elizabeth. 40. 

Des Champes, Esther, 134, 135. 

Des Champes, Francis, 135. 

Des Champes, Francis Sr., 134, 135. 

Des Champes, Peter, 135. 

Detreville, Capt. John, 52. 

Deveaux, James, 1 1 . 

Devon, Charles, 156. 

Dexter, Henry, 139. 



INDEX 



207 



Dicey, Prof., 36. 

Dixie, Hannah, 111. 

Dixie, Robert, 111. 

Doggitt, Mrs., 189. 

Donnom, William, 52, 55, 56, 58, 59, 82, 

85. 
Dorchester, S. C, 13, 197. 
Dorchester Congregational Church, 153. 
Douglas, Daniel, 95. 
Doyley, Mr., 22. 
Drayton, Mr., 116, 121, 122. 
Drayton, Dr. Charles, 102, 104. 
Drayton, Charles H, 105, 106. 
Drayton, Dorothy, 98. 
Drayton, Eliza M., 105, 106. 
Drayton, Ehzabeth, 45, 46, 104. 
Drayton, Esther, 104. 
Drayton, Glen, 104. 
Drayton, Hannah, 45, 46. 
Drayton, Henry, 104. 
Drayton, Jacob, 45, 46. 
Drayton, Hon. John, 105. 
Drayton, John Jr., 103, 105. 
Drayton, Rev. John Grimke, 105, 106. 
Drayton, Mary, 45 (2), 46, 104. 
Drayton, Mary Middleton, 105. 
Drayton, Thomas Sr., 102. 
Drayton, William, 45 (4), 46 
Drayton, William Henry, 43, 98. 
Dring, Percival, 138. 
Dubourdieu, Joseph, 203. 
Dubosc, Ann, 178. 
Dubose, James, 178. 
Dubose, Daniel, 198. 
Dubose, Martha, 17. 
Dubosque, Anne, 134. 
Ducke, Rev. Jacob, 50. 
Dundas, Rev. John, 101, 103. 
Dumay, Jean Elizabeth, 142 (2). 
Dumay, Martha, 138. 
Dumay, Peter, 142. 
Dunne, Mary, 96. 
Dupont, Dr. CorneHus, 17. 
Dupont, Elizabeth, 140. 
Dutarque, John, Jr., 136. 
Dutarque, John, Jr., 141. 
Dupre, Daniel, 134. 
Dutart, Ann, 137. 
Dutart, John, 143. 
Dwight, Rev. Daniel, 195. 

Eaton, Major, 125, 132. 

Edwards, William, 100. 

Ellery, Thomas, 172. 

Elliott, Amarinthia, 40, 41 (2), 42, 44. 

Elliott, Ann Barnet, 45. 

Elliott, Barnard, 52, 53, 70, 71, 159, 162, 

163, 164. 
Elliott, Benjamin, 30. 40, 41 (2), 42, 44, 

162. 



EUiott, Catherine, 40, 46. 

Elliott, Charles, 30. 

Elliott, Edith, 40, 99. 

Elliott, Frances, 43. 

EUiott, Gilbert, 40, 99. 

Elliott, James. 40. 

Elliott, John, 159, 160. 

EUiott, Joseph, 40 (5), 46, 99, 159, 161, 

162. 
EUiott, Mary, 49. 
EUiott, Mary BeUinger, 70, 71. 
EUiott, Sabina, 45 (2). 
EUiott, Sarah, 40 (3), 99. 
EUiott, Samuel, 162. 
EUiott, Susannah, 163. 
EUiott, Thomas, 39, 71, 98, 159, 160, 161, 

162. 
Elliott, Thomas Law, 7 1 . 
Elliott, William, 11, 45 (2), 47, 151, 158, 

159, 160, 161. 162, 163, 164, 165. 
EUiott, William Jr., 161, 162. 
Elliott, William, Carolina Sports, 70. 
Emms, Ralph, 161. 
Eustis, Mrs., 12. 
Eutaw Springs, 6. 
Eutaw Springs, battle of, 9. 
Evance, Thomas, 29. 
Evans (or Evance), Philip, 156. 
Evins, Rev. (a Baptist minister), 98. 
Evins, Stephen, 43. 

Fairchild, Richard, 67. 

Fairchild, Thomas, 92. 

Fairlawn Barony, 92. 

Fairlawn Barony, 171. 

Farr, Amerinthia, 159, 161, 162, 163, 164. 

Farr, Nancy, 105. 

Farr, Thomas, 105, 163, 164. 

Fenwick, Edward, 100. 

Fenwick, Edward, 115. 

Field, James, 53. 

Fitch, Ann, 13, 16. 

Fitch, Elizabeth, 136. 

Fitch, Isabella, 43. 

Fitch, Jonathan, 13, 16, 

Fitch, Joseph, 100. 

Fitch, Rachel, 142. 

Fleming, Martha, 198, 199. 

Florence (wine), 185. 

Foissin, Elias, 200. 

Foley, Catherine, 101. 

Foley, Capt. Thomas, 43. 

Fogartie, David, 141. 

Fogartie, Joseph, 141. 

Fogartie, Stephen, 141. 

Ford, Isaac, 137. 

Ford, Stephen, 137. 

Ford's ferry, 170. 

Fosters Creek, 6. 

Fowler, Elisha, 102. 



208 



INDEX 



Fraser, Charles, Reminiscences of Charles- 
ton, 33. 
Fraser, John, 50. 
Frick, Mr., 102. 
Fuller, Anne, 49, 103. 
Fuller, Bemjamin Cattell, 45, 46. 
Fuller, Benjamin, 45, 105. 
Fuller, Catherine, 45 (4). 
Fuller, Christopher, 45. 
Fuller, Elizabeth, 48, 49, 101. 
Fuller, Joseph, 48, 49. 
Fuller, Judith, 42, 45, 46, 48 (2), 49. 
Fuller, Lydia, 41, 44, 45. 
Fuller, Lydia N., 103. 
Fuller, Mary, 48, 49. 
Fuller, Nathaniel, 49, 100, 103. 105. 
Fuller, Sarah, 41, 42. 
Fuller, Thomas, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45 (4), 

48, 49, 98. 

Fuller, Maj. Thomas, 42, 97. 

Fuller, Col. Thomas, 43, 101. 

Fuller, Washington, 45. 

Fuller, Whitmarsh, 42, 45, 46, 48 (2), 

49, 97, 98. 

Fuller, William, 41(2), 42, 44. 
Fuller, William Cattell, 42. 
Fuller, Zacheus, 48. 
Fury, Mr., 114. 

Gadsden, Christopher, 29. 

Gaillard, Bartholomew, 141, 202. 

Gaillard, Catherine, 141, 197. 

Gaillard, Charles, 202. 

Gaillard, Elizabeth, 141. 

Gaillard, James, 8, 142. 

Gaillard, John, 139, 202. 

Gaillard, Capt. Peter, 8. 

Gaillard, Samuel, 197. 

Gaillard, Tacitus, 8, 38. 

Gaillard, Theodore, 141, 197. 

Garth, Charles, 21, 22, 23, 94. 

Gibbes, Madam, 180. 

Gibbes, Ann. 172, 191, 192. 

Gibbes, Elizabeth, 172. 

Gibbes, John, 110, 172, 192. 

Gibson, John, 97. 

Gibson, Robert, 50. 

Gignilliat, James, 13. 

Gignilliat, Jean Francois, 13, 

Gignilliat, Mary, 13. 

Girardeau, J. H., 71. 

Girardeau, Peter, 68. 

Glenn, Gov., 145. 

Godfrey, Benjamin, 45, 46. 

Godfrey, Elizabeth, 40, 41, 42, 45, 46. 

Godfrey, John, 40, 41, 45, 46, 48, 49, 98, 

102. 
Godfrey, Margaret, 49,98. 
Godfrey, Patience, 48, 49, 98. 
Godfrey, Richard, 102, 



Godfrey, Sarah, 42. 

Godfrey, Sarah Fowler, 101. 

Godfrey, Susannah, 48. 

Godfrey, Thomas, 42. 

Godfrey, William, 101. 

Godin, Capt. David, 191. 

Golden Islands 150. 

Golightly, Dorothy, 42. 

Golightly, Dorothy, 43. 

Golightly, Mary, 42. 

Gorget, John, 52, 82, 85. 

Gough, John, 110. 

Gough, John Parker, 71. 

Gough & Roche, Messrs, 93, 

Gould, WilUam Drake, 91. 

Govan, Elizabeth, 99. 

Grace, William, 42. 

Granville County 9. 

Grant, Frances, 143. 

Green, Gen., 9, 156. 

Gresham, Major, 125. 

Grimke, John Faucheraud, Order Book of, 

51, 82, 124, 166. 
Guerard, Mr., 22. 
Guerard, Hannah, 174. 
Guerard, Peter, 174. 
Guerin, EUzabeth, 98. 
Guerin, Mathurin Sr., 93, 101. 
Guerry, Peter, 140, 199. 
Gunter, Dr. Edward, 101. 

Hagan, The, plantation, 93. 
Haggatt, Elizabeth, 95. 
Haggatt Hall, 95. 
Haggatt, William, will of, 95-96. 
Hall, Mr., 93. 
Halsey, Francis, 198. 
Halsey, James, 143, 198, 199. 
Hamilton, Lieut., 90, 125. 
Hamilton, Archibald, 110. 
Hammond, Major, 166. 
Hardlock, Andrew, 48, 49. 
Hardlock, Jasper 48, 49. 
Hardlock, Mary, 48, 49. 
Harleston, Major, 129, 131. 
Harleston, Edward, 30. 
Harleston, Hannah, 112. 
Harleston, John, 30, 112. 
Harleston, Capt. John, 110. 
Harleston, Nicholas, 112. 
Harleston. Sarah, 112. 
Harley, Anne, 45, 46. 
Harley, James, 45, 46. 
Harley, WiUiam, 45, 46. 
Harrison, Rev. (of Goose Creek), 47. 
Hasell, Miss, 115. 
Hasell, Christopher G, 17. 
Hasell, Rev. Thomas, 110, 195. 
Hastie, W S., 105, 106. 
Hawley, Edward, 91, 



INDEX 



209 



Hawley, Elizabeth, 91. 

Hayne, Robert Y., 61. 

Heape, Charles, 45, 47. 

Heape, Henry, 41, 42. 

Heape, Jonathan, 41, 42, 45, 47. 

Heape, Maryan, 41, 42, 45, 47. 

Heathcote, Elizabeth, 188. 

Henderson, Col., 90. 

Herries, Peter, 138. 

Hepworth, Thomas, 156. 

Hey ward, Anne, 40 (2), 41, 42. 

Heyward, Daniel, 40. 

Hey ward, Joseph Ferguson, 172. 

Heyward, Thomas, 40 (2), 41, 42. 

Heyward, William Miles, 40, 41. 

Hey wood. Rev. Henry, 159, 160, 161. 

Highback, Ann, 137. 

Hinckle, Miss, 102. 

Hinckle, George, 40. 

Hinckle Hannah, 40, 41, 44, 47. 

Hinckle, Jacob, 40, 41, 45, 47. 

Hinckle, Polly, 45, 47. . 

Holman, Elizabeth, 100. 

Holman, John, 48, 49. 

Holman, Mary, 47, 100. 

Holman, Mary Elizabeth, 48, 49. 

Holman, Priscilla, 48, 49. 

Holman, Thomas, 100, 103. 

Holmes, Henry S., 2. 

Holt, Rev. Chas. J., 106. 

Horry, Major, 83, 124. 

Horry, Daniel, 134, 135, 136, 139. 

Horry, Daniel Jr., 136, 139. 

Horry, Elias, 30, 94, 135, 36. 

Horry, John, 135. 

Horry, Thomas, 50. 

Houser, Henry, 16. 

Howes, Robert, 16. 

Hudson, John, 42. 

Huger, Gen., 88, 125. 

Huger, Ann, 92. 

Huger, Daniel, 94, 108, 145, 146. 

Huger, Daniel, will of, 92-94. 

Huger, Daniel Jr., 93, 94. 

Huger, Francis, 93, 94. 

Huger, Isaac, 93, 94. 

Huger, John, 30, 93, 94. 

Huger, Margaret, 93, 94. 

Huger, Paul, 93, 94. 

Huger, William E., 156. 

Huggins, Anna, 201. 

Huggins, Mark, 201. 

Hughes, Elizabeth, 100. 

Hughes, James, 41, 46. 

Hughes, Joseph. 100. 

Hughes, Patrick, 41, 46, 47. 

Hughes, Rebecca, 41, 46, 47. 

Huguenot Settlement at Goose Creek, 13. 

Hull, John, 71. 

Hunt Capt. 194. 



Hunt, Benjamin, F., 61. 

Hunt, James, 96. 

Hut (The) plantation, 162. 

Hutchins, Elizabeth, 44. 

Hyrne, Benjamin, 45, 98. 

Hyrne, Henry, 11, 42, 43, 45 (3), 98. 

Hyrne, Mary, 42 (2), 45 (3), 46, 98. 

Hyrne, Sarah, 42. 

Hyrne, Sarah, 45. 

Indians, 191. 

Ingram, Rev., 161. 

Innis, Capt., 118. 

loor, Sarah, 17. 

Izard, Allen Smith, 156. 

Izard, Charles, 183. 

Izard, Georgina, 156. 

Izard, Henry, 152. 

Izard, Mary, 183. 

Izard, Patience W. B., 12. 

Izard, Ralph, 11, 12, 152, 154, 155, 156, 

158. 
Izard, Walter, 11, 183. 

Jackson, Basil, 53. 

Jamison, Capt., 55. 

Jaudon, Daniel, 134. 

Jaudon, Esther, 139. 

Jaudon, Paul, 134, 135, 139 (2). 

Jeanneret, Jacob, 199. 

Jenkins, Ann, 141. 

Jenkins, Richard, 71. 

Jennes, John, 140 

Jennens, Elizabeth, 198. 

Jennens, John, 198, 199. 

Jennens, Mary, 198, 199, 201. 

Jenner, EUzabeth, 198. 

Jenys, Paul, 181. 

Jerman, Edward, 136. 

Jervey, Elizabeth Heyward, 74. 

Jervey, Theodore, D., 2. 

Johnson, Mr., 115, 116, 196. 

Johnson, Col., 169. 

Johnson, Gov. Robert, 14, 15, 16. 

Johnson, Robert, 118, 154, 155, 172, 183, 

190, 195. 
Johnson, Robert, "alias Black Robin," 

154. 
Johnson, Thomas, 39. 
Johnson, Dr. Thomas Henry, 39, 42. 
Johnston, Andrew, 203. 
Johnstone, William, 50. 
Jones, Charles, 97. 
Jones, David, 98. 
Jones, Elizabeth, 43. 
Jones, Mary, 142, 185. 
Jones, Richard, 43. 
Jones, Samuel, 48, 49. 
Jones, Sidney, 48, 49. 
Jones, Susannah, 48, 49. 



210 



INDEX 



Jones, Thomas, 98. 
Jones, William, 142. 
Jordan, Christopher, 140. 
Jordan, Elizabeth, 140. 
Jordan, John, 140. 
Jordan, Robert, 142. 

Juckes, Landgrave Edward, 151, 154, 155, 
164, 165. 

Keating, Maurice, 185. 

Keith, Rev. Alexander, 135, 136. 

Keith, William, 145, 146, 147. 

Kelly's Cowpen, 168. 

Kennedy, Michael, 86. 

Kershaw, Rev. John, 106. 

Ketelby, Abel, Landgrave, 150-165. 

Ketelby, Robert, 151. 

Ketelby 's Barony, 150-165. 

Kiblesworth plantation, 172. 

King, Anne, 44. 

King, Deborah, 44. 

King, Hugh, 41, 42. 

King, Jean, 41, 42. 

King, Jane, 44, 97, 98. 

King, John, 98. 

King, Richard, 41, 42, 44 (3), 97. 

Kinloch, Francis, 78. 

Kinloch, Sir Francis, 6. 

Kinloch, James, 6, 7. 

Kirkwood, Mr., 44. 

Knight, Mr., 182. 

KoUock, Charles, 2. 

Ladson, Capt., 129, 131, 132, 167. 

Ladson, Abraham, 50, 104 (2). 

Ladson, Elizabeth, 104 (2). 

Ladson, Frances, 98. 

Ladson, Isaac, 42, 47, 105. 

Ladson, John, 42. 

Ladson, Joseph, 98. 

Ladson, Margaret, 47. 

Ladson, Mary, 42. 

Ladson, Rachel, 42, 104 (2). 

Ladson, Sarah, 50. 

Ladson, Thomas, 39. 

Lander, Capt. Francis, 39. 

Lansac, Susannah, 193. 

Latour, Mrs., 176, 180, 194. 

La Tour, Charlotte, 179. 

Laumoy, Col., 84, 85. 

Laurens, Mr., 22. 

Laurens, Henry, 29. 

Laurens, Susannah, 201. 

Lawrence, [Laurens ?], Henry, 198. 

Lawson, Mr., 178. 

Leafe, John, 47. 

Le Bas, James, 178. 

Le Bas, Paul Peter, 178. 

Lee, Col. Henry, 156, 157. 

Legare, Isaac, 198. 



Legg, Christopher Smith, 48, 49, 100. 

Legg, Edward, 44, 48 (2), 49 (2), 100 (2). 

Legg, Elizabeth, 44, 48 (2), 49 (2), 100. 

Legg, Elizabeth-Rebecca, 44. 

Legg Thomas, 48, 49. 

Lejeau, Francis, 93, 108, 109, 110,195. 

Lejeau, Col. Francis, 93. 

Le Noble, Miss, 179. 

Lepear, Paul, 200. 

Lequeux, Harriett, 17. 

Lesesne, Daniel, 94. 

Leslie, Robert, 91. 

Lewis, J., 138. 

Lewis, S., 199. 

Lewis, Eiias, 138. 

Lewis, William, 199. 

Lime Spring plantation, 8. 

Limrick plantation, 93. 

Lindo, Moses, 77. 

Lining, Ann, 44. 

Lining, EHzabeth, 99, 101, 103. 

Lining, John, 50, 99, 101, 103, 104. 

Lining, Mary, 99, 101, 103, 104. 

Lining, Sarah, 104. 

Listen, Mrs., 48. 

Listen, John, 47, 48. 

Liston, Thomas, 58. 

Littell, Aaron, 198, 199, 201. 

Littell, Samuel, 201. 

Lloyd, Mrs., 39. 

Lloyd, John, 29. 

Lock, Col., 55. 

Logan, Mary, 138. 

Lowndes, Mr., 21. 

Lyford, Martha, 39. 

Lyford, William, 39. 

Lynch, Sabina, 44. 

Lynch, Thomas, 7. 

Lynch, Thomas, 30, 93, 94, 

McCall, Mary, 50. 
McClelland, Archibald, 134, 135. 
McCormick, Nathaniel, 133. 
McDonald, Adam, 40, 43, 99. 
McDonald, Alexander, 86. 
McDonald, Anne-Bellah, 40. 
McDonald, Fanney-Fitch, 40. 
McDonald, Frances, 99. 
McDonald, Isabella, 40. 
McDowell, Col., 169. 
Mack Dowll, Ann, 138. 
Mack Dowll. George, 138. 
McGregor, Alexander, 201. 
McGregor, Daniel, 138, 140, 201. 
M'Gregor, Elizabeth, 141. 
M'Karty, Jane, 134. 
McKarty Michael, 134. 
Mackee, Allen, 142. 
McKelvey, James, 7. 
Mackintosh, Captain, 44. 



INDEX 



211 



Mackintosh, Alexander, 43. 

McQueen, Alexander, 101. 

Mailing Barony, 12-17. 

Malmody, Col., 167. 

Man, Ann, 42, 99, 100. 

Man, Beulah, 99, 100. 

Man, Elizabeth. 101. 

Man, John, 42, 98, 102, 103. 

Man, John- Vincent, 50, 99, 100. 

Man, Martha, 98. 

Man, Thomas, 42. 

Manigault, Mr., 183. 

Manigault, Ann, 113. 

Manigault, Gabriel, 94, 113, 178. 

Manigault, Joseph, 113. 

Manigault, Peter, 29, 30, 178, 188, 190, 

195. 
Manigault, Peter, Letters of, 113-123. 
Mansion House plantation, 153. 
Manzequen, Mary, 182. 
Marion, Benjamin, 8. 
Marion, Esther, 145-146. 
Marion, Francis, 8, 141, 145, 163. 
Marion, Gabriel, 8, 145, 146. 
Marion, Gabriel Jr., 147. 
Marion, Job, 141. 
Marion, John, 198. 
Mars, John, 124. 
Marshall, James, 96. 
Mathews, James, 40. 
Mathews, Agnes Haig, 105. 
Matthews, Paul F., 105. 
Matthews, Susan Pauline, 105. 
Matthews, WiUiam, 202. 
Mayers, John, 137. 
Maynard, Charles, 199. 
Mayrant, James Nicholas, 93. 
Mayrant, John, 93, 135, 142. 
Mayson, Col., 87, 88, 131, 170. 
Mazyck, Mr., 22. 
Mazyck, Catherine, 179. 
Mazyck, Isaac, 179. 
Mazyck, Paul, 179. 
Mell, Anne, 40, 41. 
Mell, Benjamin, 40, 41. 
Mell, WilUam 40, 41. 
Mellichamp, Mr., 114. 
Mellichamp, Catherine, 43. 
Mellichamp, Martha, 101. 
Mellichamp, Thomas Senr., 103. 
Middleton, Arthur, 22. 
Middleton, Esther, 102. 
Middleton, Henry, 102. 
Middleton, Mary Henrietta, 102. 
Middleton, Hon. William, 64. 
Mikell, Ephraim, 159. 
Miles, Anne, 39, 43, 99, 100. 
Miles, Edward, 39, 41 (2), 44 (2), 46. 
Miles, Elizabeth, 39, 41, 43, 44, 46. 
Miles, John, 39, 99, 100. 



Miles, Jonathan, 99, 100. 

Miles, Lewis, 197. 

Miles, Moses, 197. 

Miles, Susannah, 39. 

Miles, WiUiam, 41, 46, 49, 103. 

Mills, WiUiam Henry, 203. 

Minors, Robert, 137. 

Miot, Alexander, 137, 142, 197. 

Mitchell, Capt., 54. 

MitcheU, Capt. E., 52. 86. 

Mitchell, Capt. James, 52, 83, 84, 86, 87. 

Mitchell, Capt, WiUiam, 52. 

Mitchell, WiUiam Boone, 153, 162, 164. 

Mitten plantation, 178. 

Monck, Miss, 194, 196. 

Monck, Joanna, 194. 

Monck, Thomas, 174, 178, 194. 

Moncrieff, Mr., 144, 145. 

Money, Susanna, 139. 

Monk, John, 200. 

Montague, Lord Charles Greville, 29. 

Montgomery, Elizabeth, 203. 

Montgomery, Sir Robert, 150. 

Moore, James, 173. 

Moore, Henry, 53. 

Moore, Col. James, 64. 

Moore, William, 93. 

Moreland, Andrew, 106. 

Moreland, Susan Cochran, 106. 

Morgan, David, 40. 

Morison, Samuel Eliot, 60. 

Morley, Mr., 114. 

Morris, Robert, 198. 

Morrison, Robert, 199, 200. 

Motte, Mr., 116. 

Motte, Mrs., 116. 

Motte, Isaac, Jr., 7. 

Moultrie, Gen., 57, 89. 

Moultrie, WiUiam, 30. 

Mouzon, Peter, 134, 135, 199, 202. 

Mucklewain, Francis, 102. 

Mulberry plantation, 171. 

MuUins, George, 101, 103. 

Murdaugh, William, 44. 

Murrill, Ann, 199. 

Murrill, Martha, 142, 199. 

Nelson's Ferry, 9 

New Mercia plantation, 8. 

Newberry, Mr., 188. 

New Market plantation, 181. 

Nicholas, Capt., 55. 

Nicholase, EHzabeth, 137. 

Nicholson, Catherine, 43. 

Nicholson, Francis, 151. 

Nicholson, John, 93. 

Normand, Mary, 134. 

Nutcher, Mary, 43. 

Oglethorpe, Gen., 181. 



212 



INDEX 



Old House plantation, 153. 

Oldham, Bennet, 40, 41, 42, 43. 

Oldham, Harriet, 40, 41, 42. 

Oldham, William Thomas Harriet, 40, 

41, 43. 
Oliphant, Jane, 101. 
O'Neal, Charles, 7. 
O'Neal, Margaret, 6, 7. 
Otis, Harrison Gray, Life and Letters of, 

60-61. 

Pacy, Thomas, 199. 

Palmer, John, 67, 69. 

Palmer, Joseph, 135, 136. 

Panting, Rev. Thomas, 99, 100. 

Parsons, Mr., 22. 

Parsons, James, 30. 

Patterson, James, 100. 

Peacock, Miss, 101. 

Pearson, Capt., 121. 

Peirce, Rev. (of Dorchester), 50, 101, 

103. 
Perdriau, Benjamin, 93. 137, 203. 
Perdriau, Benjamin Jr., 93. 
Perdriau, Elizabeth, 93, 135. 
Perdriau, Lydia, 93, 137, 200. 
Perdriau, Mary, 141. 
Peronneau, Alexander, 103. 
Perry, Benjamin, 43. 
Perry, Edward, 152, 153, 154. 
Perry, Dr. Fabricus, 157. 
Peyre, Floride, 197. 
Pinckeny, Mr., 22. 
Pinckney, Major, 125, 166. 
Pinckney, Col., 169. 
Pinckney, Ann, 95. 
Pinckney, Anne, M., 106. 
Pinckney, Anna Maria, 95. 
Pinckney, Charles. 11, 29, 158, 194-196. 
Pinckney, C. C. 106. 
Pinckney, Charles Cotesworth, 158. 
Pinckney, Eliza Lucas, 158. 
Pinckney, Jane, 95. 
Pinckney, Mary, 95. 
Pinckney, Roger, will of, 94-95. 
Pinckney, Sallie Morgan, 106. 
Pinckney, Thomas, 2. 
Pinckney, William Cotesworth, 71. 
Pinckney Plains plantation, 157, 158. 
Pine Hill plantation, 157, 158. 
Pitt, William, 18-28. 
Pitt, Wilton's Statue of, 18-38. 
Platen P. F., 53, 83. 
Plum Patch plantation, 7. 
Poaug, John, 30. 
Pond BluflF plantation, 8. 
Pooshee plantation. 179. 
Poplar Hill plantation, 152, 153. 
Poppenheim, Lewis, 17. 
Postell, Peter Bohun, 7 1 . 



Postell, WilHam, 164. 

Pourroy, Mr., 118. 

Power, John, 99, 100. 

Power, Mary, 99, 100. 

Power, Philip, 99, 100. 

Prevaux, EHzabeth, 16, 17. 

Prince, Frederick parish, 133, 134. 

Prince George Winyah, 134. 

Pringle House, 144. 

Purcell, Jphn, 5. 

Purcell, Rev., 101. 

Quakers, 161. 
Quandrean, John, 125. 
Quash, Robert, Jr., 30. 
Quarterman, Mary, 101. 
Quenby, County Leicester, 115. 

Rae, Col., 83. 

Raiford, Captain, 126, 129, 132, 168, 170. 

Ramsden, J., 96. 

Randolph, Peyton, 29. 

Raphoe Barony, 3-9. 

Raphoe Barony, map of, 3. 

Raven, John, 159. 

Raven el, Rene Louis, 179. 

Read, Motte Alston, 2. 

Reaston, Captain, 116, 122, 123. 

Reaston, Mrs., 188. 

Reaston, Thomas, 184-186, 188, 

190, 193, 194. 
Reid, James, 30. 
Rem, Barbara, 97 (2). 
Rem, John Martin, 97(2), 98. 
Rem, Margaret, 97. 
Rembert, Judith, 136, 140, 143. 
Rembert, Andrew, 136. 
Rembert, Isaac, 200. 
Rembert, Isaac, Senr., 134, 136. 
Rembert, James, 143. 
Rice Hope plantation, 93. 
Rind, James Nathaniel, 193. 
Rind, Dr. William, 192-193. 
Riscoe, Nathaniel, 15. 
Rivers, Benjamin, 104. 
Rivers, Charles, 41. 
Rivers, EHzabeth, 98, 104. 
Rivers, Francis, 40, 43. 
Rivers, John, 98 (2). 
Rivers, Jonathan, 40. 
Rivers, Mary, 50, 101, 104. 
Rivers. Rebeccah, 41, 49, 97. 
Rivers', Robert, 41, 42, 97. 
Rivers, Sarah, 98. 
Rivers, Suannah, 40. 
Robert, Elizabeth, 139. 
Roberts, James, 138. 
Roberts, Col. Owen, 52. 
Roberts, Capt. Richard, Brook 52, 83» 

85, 87. 1 



189, 



INDEX 



213 



Roberts, William, 134, 197. 

Robinson, Francis, 101. 

Robinson, Jane, 99, 101 (3). 

Robinson, John, 101. 

Robinson, William, 99, 101 (3). 

Roche, Francis, 201. 

Rodes, Sir John, 188. 

Rogers, Capt., 117. 

Roper, Mr., 22. 

Rose, Mrs. A. G., 108. 

Rose, Elizabeth, 50. 

Rose, Elizabeth Anne, 97. 

Rose, Francis, 44, 46, 47(2), 50, 97, 101, 

102, 104 (2). 
Rose, James, 46, 47. 
Rose, Mary, 101, 103, 104. 
Rose, Mary Anne, 99, 101. 
Rose, Rebecca, 99, 101. 
Rose, Richard, 102. 
Rose, Robert, 49, 99, 101, 104. 
Rose, Sarah, 46, 47 (2), 101, 104. 
Rose, Thomas, 50, 102, 103. 
Rothmahler, Job, 178, 203. 
Rotund Savannah plantation, 152. 
Royer, Ann, 135. 
Russell, Sarah, 43. 
Rutherford, Gen., 51, 54. 
Rutledge, Mr., 115. 
Rutledge, Mrs., 100. 
Rutledge, John, 30, 61. 

St. Andrew's Parish Register, 39, 97. 
St. James Santee. Parish Register of, 133, 

197. 
St John's Parish, 141. 
St. Stephen's Parish, 135. 
Sallen, Peter, 94. 
Salley, A. S. Jr., 2, 23, 69. 
Saltus, Elizabeth, 16. 
Saltus, Richard, 16, 17. 
Sams, Donald D., 105. 
Samways, John, 39, 100. 
Samways, Mary, 39. 
Sanders, Col., 55. 
Sanders, James, 153. 
Sanders, Lawrence, 153. 
Sanders, Mary, 50. 
Sanders, WiUiam, 101, 153. 
Sarrasin, Stephen, 107. 
Savage, John, 160. 
Savage, Thomas, 29. 
Say, Mrs., 39. 
Say, Edward, 39. 
Schwab, Rev. Christopher, Ernest, 50, 

99, 102, 103. 
Schencking, Bernard, 70. 
Schen eking, Katherine, 70. 
Scott, Capt., 189. 
Scott, Lieut. Col., 85. 
Scott, Mr., 22. ' 



Scott, Ann, 45, 46, 48 (2), 49, 97, 99. 

Scott, Archibald, 101. 

Scott, David, 101. 

Scott, Jane, 48, 99. 

Scott, Martha, 48, 49, 97. 

Scott, Sarah Priscilla, 49. 

Scott, Thomas, 45, 46, 48 (2), 49 (2), 97, 

99. 
Scott, William, 30, 102. 
Scriven, Thomas, 43. 
Seaton, plantation 172. 
Seles, Hendrick, 43. 
Sereau, Mrs., 179. 
Sergeant, Rev., 39. 
Serre, Judith, 135, 136. 
Sheldon, Rev. George, 154. 
Sheldon Church, 12. 
Shepperd, Joannah, 50. 
Sherman's Army, 12. 
Shingleton, Col., 202. 
Simmons, Anne, 197. 
Simmons, Elizabeth, 135. 
Simmons, George, 135, 197, 199. 
Simmons, Mary, 199. 
Simons, Frances, 198. 
Sinkler, James, 7. 
Sinkler, Peter, 7. 
Skene, Rev., 43. 
Skinner, William, 108. 
Skirving, James, 158. 
Skirving, James Jr., 30. 
Skotowe, Thomas, 43. 
Slann, Capt. Peter, 151, 157. 
Slaves, 162. 
Small-pox, 187. 
Smallwood, Judith, 40, 41, 45, 46, 98, 

100, 101. 
Smallwood, Mary Ann, 98, 101. 
Smallwood, Mathew, 40, 41, 45, 46, 98, 

100, 101. 
Smallwood, Richard, 45, 46. 
Smallwood, William 
Smith, Mr., 54. 
Smith, Mrs., 102. 
Smith, Ann, 50. 
Smith, AHce R. Huger, 144. 
Smith, Benjamin, 163. 
Smith, D. E. Huger, 2, 18, 61, 144, 171. 
Smith, Edward, 100. 
Smith, Elizabeth, 43. 
Smith, G. H., 154. 
Smith, Henery, 153. 
Smith, Henry A. M,, 2, 3, 63, 107, 150. 

171, 192. 
Smith, John, 200. 
Smith, Joseph Allen, 156. 
Smith, Mary, 142, 200. 
Smith, Phebe, 140. 
Smith, Thomas, 153. 
Smith, Thomas, 2d Landgrave, 153. 



214 



INDEX 



Snell, Susannah, 92. 

Snowden, Yates, 2. 

South Carolina Almanacs, 73-81. 

Sowers, Adam, 47. 

Sowers, Elizabeth, 47. 

South Carolina Gleanings in England, 9 1 . 

South Sea Annuities, 93, 

Spanish Invasion of Georgia, 181-182. 

Spencer, Joseph, 200. 

Spencer, Mary, 133. 

Spencer, Rebecca, 199, 200. 

Spencer, Thomas, 133, 139. 

Spencer, Thomas Jr., 136. 

Stanford, John, 84. 

Stanyarne, Archibald, 30. 

Stead, Mr., 115. 

Stead, Benjamin, 164. 

Steadland plantation, 164. 

Stent, Mary, 100. 

Stent, Samuel, 100. 

Stephens, Rev. (a Baptist), 44. 

Stevens, John, 13, 151, 153. 

Stevens, Dr. Samuel, 153. 

Stobo, Ann, 48. 

Stobo, Charlotte, 101, 102. 

Stobo, Elizabeth Louisa, 48. 

Stobo, Jean, 48. 

Stobo, John Rutledge, 48. 

Stobo, Mary, 48 (5), 102 (2), 105. 

Stobo, Richard Park, 48 (5), 101, 102 (2), 

105. 
Stobo, vSarah, 101, 102. 
Stone, Mr., 42. 
Stone, Ruth, 40, 41. 
Stone, Benjamin, 40, 41, 46, 49. 
Stone, Ruth, 46, 49. 
Stone, Susannah, 46, 49. 
Storrs, Mr., 189. 
Strawberry bluff, 107. 
Strode (or Stroud), John, 6. 
Strode, Susannah, 6. 
Sullivan, Esther, (or Hester), 201, 202. 
Sullivan, Hannah, 20. 
Sullivan, Joseph, 202. 
Sullivan, Rebecca, 133 (2), 134. 
Sullivan, Stephen, 134, 139, 140. 141, 

143. 
Summersett, Capt., 115, 
Summerville, S. C, 14. 
Sumner, Col., 87, 168. 
Swetman, John, 99, 100. 
Swetman, Mrs., 99. 
Swetman, Margaret, 99. 

Tate, Lieut., 56, 58, 59, 82, 85, 87, 88. 

Tate, William, 53. 

Taylor, Captain, 124. 

Taylor, John, 43, 98. 

Thomas, Col, 168. 

Thomas, Catherine, 136. 



Thomas, James, 103. 

Thomas, Mary, 112. 

Thomas, Noah, 140. 

Thomas, Samuel, 112. 

Thompson, Rev., 183. 

Thompson, George, 122. 

Toasts, 27. 

Tomotley Barony, 9-12, 67, 

Trapier, Paul, 202, 203. 

Travours, Joan, 145. 

Tray, Christian, 39. 

Tray, Elizabeth, 46, 47, 48, 49. 

Tray, George, 39, 46, 47, 48, 49. 

Tray, Mary, 46, 47. 

Trench, Alexander, 4, 5, 6, 7. 

Trench's Barony, 7. 

Tucker, Capt. Thomas, 105. 

Tunsteed, Francis, 111. 

Tunsteed, Margaret, 111. 

Turner, Henry, 159. 

Turner, John, 159. 

Two Sisters Ferry, 55-57, 58. 

Tynte, Gov. Edward, 150. 

Vanderthussen, Col. Alexander, 115. 
Villa plantation, 157, 165. 
Villepontoux, Francis, 110. 
Verdal, Thomas, 43. 

Wainwright, Samuel, 152, 153. 

Waite, Ezra, 144. 

Walker, Alexander, 48, 49, 97, 99 (2) 100. 

Walker, Anne, 48, 49, 99 (2), 100. 

Walker, Charles Cattell, 100. 

Walker, Sir Hovenden, 13, 17. 

Walker, Martha-EUiott, 48, 99 (2). 

Walker, William, 143. 

Walker, Col. William, 14. 

Walker, William Fairchild, 49, 97. 

Walker, Wndym, 92. 

Wallace, Dorothy, 106. 

Wallace, Helen Yates, 106 (2). 

Wallace, WiUiam, Gordon, 106. 

Wallace, William Montgomery, 106 (2). 

Waller, Margaret, 203. 

Walnut Grove plantation, 8. 

Walnut Hill plantation, 152. 

Walter, Hannah Christiana, 104 (2). 

Walter, Jane, 104 (2). 

Walter, John-AUeyne, 101, [misprinted 

Walker], 104 (2). 
Walter, Richard, 17. 
Walworth plantation, 8. 
Wampee, 178. 
Waring, Benjamin, 30. 
Waring, Joseph, 157. 
Waring, Richard, 157. 
Waring, Thomas, 157, 158. 
Warley, Felix, 86. 
Warren, Captain, 179. 



INDEX 



215 



Warren, Sir Peter, 115. 

Warren, Rev. Samuel Fenner, 133-143, 

197-203. 
Warren, Samuel Fenner, (Marriage of), 

135. 
Wassamsaw, 178. 
Waties, Mr., 125. 
Waties, Elizabeth, 202, 203. 
Watson, Mr., 192, 196. 
Weaver, Capt. Lieut., 83, 85. 
Webb, Elizabeth, 202. 
Webb, William, 68. 

Webber, Mabel L., 2, 39, 83, 133, 197. 
West, Landgrave, 178. 
Westbury, Anne, 50. 
Westo Indians, 154. 
Westo plantation, 152. 
Weston, F. H., 2. 
Wheeler, Rev. (a Baptist), 42. 
White, Thomas, 44. 
Whitecomb Rawlegh, 91. 
Whitter, Mrs., 115. 
Wickly, John, 52. 
Wilkes, John, 20. 
Williams, Ehzabeth, 39. 
Williams, Francis, 109. 



Williams, Joseph, 39, 97. 

Williams, Mary, 134. 

Williams, Rowland, 124. 

Williamson, Gen., 167. 

Wilson, Hugh, 98. 

Wilson, James, 52. 

Wilson, Thomas, 136. 

Wilton, Rev., 43. 

Wilton, Joseph, see Wilton's Statue of 

Pitt, 18. 
Wilton, Rev. Joseph Darcy, 44. 
Wilton's Statue of Pitt, 18-38. 
Winn, Capt., 169. 
Wise, Major, 88, 132, 169. 
Withers, Richard, 201. 
Withington, Lothrop, 91. 
Wragg, Ehzabeth, 113. 
Wragg, Samuel, 151, 152, 155. 
Wragg, William, 152. 
Wright, James, 160. 
Wright, Thomas, 69. 
Wright, W. Redwood, 145. 
Yellow fever, 174. 
Yemassee Indians, 9. 
Yemassee Lands, 10. 
Yemassee War, 172. 



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THE 

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PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY THE 

SOUTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



EDITED BY 
MABEL LOUISE WEBBER 



VOLUME XVI 




BALTIMORE 

WILLIAMS & WILKLNS COMPANY 

1915 



OFFICERS 

OF THE 

SOUTH CAROLINA HISTORICALSOCIETY 

January, 1915 — January, 1916. 

President, 
Hon. Joseph W. Barnwell. 

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Hon. Henry A. M. Smith. 

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A. S. Salley, Jr. 



i;Lj!^l„, . , r. 

FIREPR. •. , . ,,^ 

CHARLES'! ON, 5, SOUTH CAROLIN 



THE 



SOUTH CAROLINA 

HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 

MAGAZINE 




PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY THE 

SOUTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



VOLUME XVI, No. i 



JANUARY, 1915 



Entered at the Post-office at Charleston, S. C, as 
Second-Class Matter 



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE. 
Joseph W. Barnwell, Henry A. M. Smith, 

A. S. S ALLEY, Jr. 

EDITOR OF THE MAGAZINE. 
Mabel L. Webber. 



CONTENTS 

Old Charles Town and its vicinity, Accabee and Wappo 
Where Indigo Was First Cultivated, With Some Adjoining 
Places in Old St. Andrews Parrish 1 

Parrish Register of St. James', Santee 16 

A List of Noncommissioned Officers and Private Men of the 
Second South Carolina Continental Regiment of Foot. . . 25 

Death Notices From the South Carolina and American 
General Gazette, and its Continuation the Royal Gazette . 34 

Order Book of John Faucheraud Grimke 39 



N. B. — These Magazines, with the exception of No. 1 of 
Vol. I, are $1.25 to any one other than a member of the South 
Carolina Historical Society. Members of the Society receive 
them free. The Membership fee is $4.00 per annum (the fiscal 
year being from January to January), and members can buy 
back numbers or duplicates at $1.00 each. In addition to 
receiving the Magazines, members are allowed a discount of 25 
per cent, on all other publications of the Society, and have the 
free use of the Society's library. 

Any member who has not received the last number will 
please notify the Secretary and Treasurer. 

Miss Mabel L. Webber, 

South Carolina Historical Society, 

Charleston. S. C. 



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE. 

Joseph W. Barnwell, Henry A. M. Smith, 

A. S. Salley, Jr. 

EDITOR OF THE MAGAZINE. 
Mabel L. Webber. 



CONTENTS 

Old Charles Town and its vicinity, Accabee and Wappo 
Where Indigo Was First Cultivated, With Some Adjoining 
Places in Old St. Andrews Parrish 1 

Parrish Register of St. James', Santee 16 

A List of Noncommissioned Officers and Private Men of the 
Second South Carolina Continental Regiment of Foot. . . 25 

Death Notices From the South Carolina and American 
General Gazette, and its Continuation the Royal Gazette. 34 

Order Book of John Faucheraud Grimke 39 



N. B. — These Magazines, with the exception of No. 1 of 
Vol. I, are $1.25 to any one other than a member of the South 
Carolina Historical Society. Members of the Society receive 
them free. The Membership fee is $-1.00 per annum (the fiscal 
year being from January to January), and members can buy 
back numbers or duplicates at $1.00 each. In addition to 
receiving the Magazines, members are allowed a discount of 25 
per cent, on all other publications of the Society, and have the 
free use of the Society's library. 

Any member who has not received the last number will 
please notify the Secretary and Treasurer. 

Miss Mabel L. Webber, 

South Carolina Historical Society, 

Charleston, S. C. 



m: 






Uix (jntit/)? an mippoo GfjM idinx JnsLco wtto 



I aJjiv 



/£*^ 



(irrwi&tL^tm »l«L eUtd^ a/Kit ftoM in. 



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JL 4Ji.- c/} Url old. iniAi (^ Gat: '[uica^ f>Ot/n. 



Reduced to \ of oriKinal sizt 




The South Carolina 

Historical and Genealogical 

Magazine 

VOL. XVI JANUARY, 1915 No. 1 



OLD CHARLES TOWN AND ITS VICINITY, ACCABEE 
AND WAPPOO WHERE INDIGO WAS FIRST CULTI- 
VATED, WITH SOME ADJOINING PLACES IN OLD 
ST. ANDREWS PARISH. 

By Henry A. M. Smith. 

The original settlement by the English in South Carolina was 
at a point on the Southwest side of the Ashley river, at the place 
now known as Old Town plantation. At that place a creek 
makes in from the river running first generally to the Southwest, 
and then turning Northwest and forming a neck of land bounded 
Northeast by the marshes of Ashley river Southeast, South, and 
Southwest by this creek and its marshes, and Northwest by a 
narrow extent of high land capable then of easy defence. The 
river, as far at least as that point, was called by the native In- 
dians by a name spelled by the settlers variously as Keyawah, 
Kyawaw, Kayawah, Chyawhaw, Kiwaha, Kywaha, Keywaha, 
and Kiawah^ which last, viz., Kiawah, became later the accepted 
form; pronounced Kee-a-wah. 

As early as 1666 Robert Sanford in his exploration of the coast 
named the river "that leadeth into the country of Kywaha" the 
River Ashley "from the right Hon^'« Anthony Lord Ashley."^ 
Sandford appears to have alluded to the inlet that forms Charles- 
ton Harbour as he does not seem to have entered in far enough 

1 Coll""^ Hist. Soc. of S. C, Vol. 5, pp. 68, 80, 166, 169, 173, 186. 

2 Ibid., p. 80. 

1 



2 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

to be aware that the inlet was divided into two rivers by the 
peninsula now the site of the city of Charleston. 

Sometime early in April, 1670 (according to Carteret's relation^) 
the first ship with Governor Sayle reached Kiawah and selected 
the place just described for the settlement. The neck of land so 
settled upon they called "Albemarle Point."* On 20 Sept^ • 
1670, Florence O'Sullivan wrote to Lord Ashley, "We build our 
towne upon a point of land called Albemarle point seated upon 
the River that leads in from the sea called by us Ashley river, "^ 
and William Owen also writing to Lord Ashley on 15 Sepf, 1670, 
says, "We have made choise for y® better having pitcht on a 
pointe defended by y^ maine river with a brooke on y^ one side, 
and inaccessible Marshe one y^ other w°^ att high tides is ever 
overflowne: ioying itself to y*^ mainland in a small neck not ex- 
ceeding fiftie yards which now is pallizadoed, and with a verye 
small charg might be made impregnable."^ 
On 1^' Novr, 1670, Lord Ashley writing to Joseph West in Caro- 
lina informs him, "you are to take notice that the River was 
by Captain Sandford long since named Ashley River and still 
is to be called soe, and the Towne you are now planted on we 
have named and you are to call Charles Towne. "^ 

Notwithstanding this notice (or perhaps because it was not 
sooner received) the town continued to be called "Albemarle 
Point" as late as March 1670/P but according to a memo, in the 
handwriting of John Locke made about August, 1671, he notes, 
"The towne cald Charlestowne"^ and Joseph West writing on 
3'^ Septs 1671, dates his letter, "Charles Towne upon Ashley 
River."!" 

At that time some construction was under way in the town, 
for the Council in a letter to the Proprietors dated 21 March 
1671/2 say, "We have with much adoe, our people being weake 
by reason of scarcity of provisions, pallasadoed about 9 acres 
of land, being a point, whereon we first set downe for our better 
security and mounted seaven great Gunns;" and "when we ar- 
rived here, we thought it most conducing to our safety to build 

3 Coir^ Hist. Soc. of S. C, Vol. 5, p. 168. ' Ibid., p. 211. 

' Ibid., pp. 173, 174. « Ibid., pp. 275, 287, 309. 

<* Ibid., p. 188. 9 Ibid., p. 350. 

« Ibid., p. 196. " Ibid., p. 389. 



OLD CHARLES TOWN 3 

a town, where we are now settled, it being a point with a very 
convenient landing, and safely fortified, being almost surrounded 
with a large Marsh and Creek. "^^ 

The minutes of the first meeting of the Grand Council as now 
known to us records the meeting held 25 August, 1671, with 
Col. Joseph West as Governor and notes the meeting as held 
"at Charles Towne upon Ashley River" and the name Albemarle 
Point as applied to this first settlement seems to have ceased 
between March and August, 1671. 

There has been some confusion with regard to the application 
of the name "Albemarle Point." Governor William Sayle who 
died in the Province 4**^ March, 1670/1, left a will dated 30 Sepf 
1670 whereby he devised to his son Nathaniel Sayle, "all that 
my Mansion House and Town Lot on Albemarle Point in the said 
Province of Carolina"^" and on some old map on a very small 
scale, apparently this mansion house was placed as on the point 
where Wappoo creek enters Ashley river opposite the present 
City of Charleston which point was marked as Albemarle Point. 
The present writer was with others so misled.^^ Data which has 
later been made accessible proves this to be incorrect. Albe- 
marle Point was the point or neck of land selected as the place 
of first settlement and the mansion house of Governor Sayle re- 
ferred to in his will was almost without doubt in the town first 
known as Albemarle Point and later as Charles Town. The 
point of land at the junction of Wappoo creek and Ashley river 
was taken up first by Sir John Yeamans the Governor 1672-1674 
who there had a house or "mansion" and some mixing as to the 
two governors and the dating of Sayle's letters from Albemarle 
Point doubtless caused the mistake. 

A town with lots and streets was laid out as soon as the settlers 
landed. Gov' Sayle as we have seen on Sepf. 1670 devises his 
"Town Lot." The Grand Council write the Proprietors in March, 
1670/1 that they had granted town lots containing eleven poles 
or thereabouts, with ten acre lots to plant. The ten-acre lots 
being laid out about the town from the South Westward to the 
North, which model they had been forced to exercise at first for 

^^ColF^Hist. Soc. of S. C, Vol. 5, pp. 283, 284. 

^'Rivers' Sketch, p. 385. 

1^5. C. Hist. &- Gen. Mag., Vol. 1, p. 32.5. 



4 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

better defence and speedy concourse to the Town.^^ This model 
may not have pleased the Proprietors for on 1 May, 1671, they 
enclose to the Governor and Council a model plan for a town to 
be followed.^^ The Proprietors altered their minds for Lord 
Ashley writing later (15 Dec', 1671) to Governor Yeamans — 
"Wee have in Favour of the first Planters altered our minds about 
the Port Towne on the River Ashley as you will find by our 
Generall Letter which through the little care was taken to lay 
it out into Convenient Streets at theire first comeing it cannot 
be made soe exactly regular and beautyful as Wee wish yet wee 
desire you would use your Endeavour to have the Streets layd 
out as large orderly and convenient as possibly may be."^^ This 
suggestion was acted upon. At the meeting of the Grand Coun- 
cil held 22 July, 1672, it is recorded that "The persons here- 
under named came this day before the Grand Councill and for 
the better Modell of Charles Towne according to the annexed 
Scheme did surrender all their lands in the said Towne and agreed 
to possess only the severall lots as hereafter is menconed that is 
to say."" Then follows a list of the settlers with the lots as- 
signed to each. The lots aggregate 62 and the list of names is 
valuable as an authentic list of actual settlers at that early date. 
According to an old letter among the Shaftsbury papers dated 
about March 1671 the size of the town is given viz., "Our towne 
called Albemarle Point is scituate on a point W'' is almost encom- 
passed w*** a large Marsh & may easily be fortified w*'' a broad 
trench, it contains about 80 acres of Land."^* 

There is in existence, known to the writer, no copy of the plan 
or model of the town: of either the original or the revised model. 
All that exists is the plan on Culpeppers map of Ashley river (the 
frontispiece to Vol. 5 of the Colt^^ of the Historical Society of So. 
Ca.) and that it evidently meant to indicate only the general 
location and is not any exact plan of the town. 

The town so founded continued as the seat of the govern- 
ment until 1680 when the government was removed to the "Oyster 

" Co//"« Hist. Soc. of S. C, Vol. 5, p. 284. 

'^Ibid., p. 323. 

" Ibid., p. 360. 

^' Printed Journal of Grand Council, p. 40. 

i«C<7//"« Hist. Soc. ofS. C, Vol. 5, p. 309. 



OLD CHARLES TOWN 5 

Point" thereafter known as Charles Town and the site of the 
present city of Charleston. The advantages of this last site were 
so manifest that at the very first settlement Governor Sayle 
directed that about 600 acres between the Ashley and Wando 
(Cooper) rivers be left vacant for a town and fort.^^ 

It appears that the new settlement on the Oyster Point had for 
some time been receiving inhabitants at the expense of the old, 
the only reason for occupying which in the beginning had been its 
better defensive position for a weak settlement. After the trans- 
fer of the government the old town seems to have rapidly de- 
cayed. It was probably abandoned as a town almost imme- 
diately and the name Charles Town was finally transferred to 
the new town. In the minutes of the Grand Council for 1«* 
June 1680 held "att Charles Towne" directions are given that 
certain Indians held in bondage be brought before the Grand 
Council "at Kaiawah sometimes called Charles Towne. "^^ There 
was nothing in the way of any permanent construction to restrain 
abandonment. The fortifications were trenches or moats and 
banks with "palisadoes" of fresh cut wood of very temporary 
existence. The houses and "mansions" were almost certainly 
of that original colonial American architecture which consisted 
of logs squared, or round, built in square pens, one, or more 
connected together; with the interstices or "chinks" well filled 
with clay, and roofed with shingles, and in the cases of greater 
opulence ceiled or lined inside with boards called "clapboards," 
i.e., split and not sawed from logs. The chimneys at first were 
sun dried clay mixed with straw or pine needles although the 
burning of clay into bricks seems very early to have been intro- 
duced into the colony. When the present writer was a boy the 
only apparent relic of the old town was a shallow depression run- 
ning from the marsh on the river to the creek on the West which 
was said to be the line of the old defensive trench or moat. 

After 1680 the name Charles Town was understood to refer 
to the town on the Oyster Point.^i The very lot owners at old 
Charles Town seem to have simply abandoned their lots and 
grants, which were later taken up by and granted to other per- 
is Co;/°« Hist. Soc. of S. C, Vol. 5, p. 378. 
2" Printed Journal of Grand Council, p. 84. 
" 5. C. Hist. &• Geti. Mag., Vol. 9, p. 11. 



6 SO. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

sons. Between 1694 and 1697 the following grants were made 
to one James Le Sad or as more commonly spelled Le Sade, viz. :^^ 

Acres 

15 May, 1694 70 

24 Febry, 1696 65 

24 Febry, 1696 285 

19 Sept^ 1696 240 

8 Sepf, 1697 100 

760 

The writer has never found anything upon the records as to 
Le Sade's nativity although he apparently was a French Hugue- 
not immigrant. He may have come via Ireland as he had a 
sister whose married name was Neale but as two persons named 
Neale took out grants not far from Le Sade, about the same 
time he obtained his own, she may have married after her arrival 
in Carolina. 

The grants to Le Sade included all the high land on which 
Albemarle Point or Old Charles Town had been situated to- 
gether with much more to the West and North and his planta- 
tion included in these grants, was in his time, as it has been ever 
since, known as "Old Town Plantation." The record does not 
show why these lands so formerly laid out to others were now 
regranted to Le Sade. There was probably another grant of 
200 acres to James Le Sade for by a deed of his nephew Peter 
Le Sade it is stated that his uncle's Old Town plantation con- 
tained 960 acres. James Le Sade left a Will dated 3 Novr 1703 
whereby after a life estate to his wife Elizabeth he devised his 
lands to his brother Peter Le Sade and his sister Mary Neale 
each one half but if neither his sister nor any child of hers ap- 
peared and claimed within three years after his death then the 
whole was to go to his brother Peter. No claim having been 
made the whole vested in Peter who by his will dated 9 August, 
1716, devised the Old Town plantation after the death of his own 
wife Ann to his son Peter except 250 acres which he devised to his 
daughter Ann then the wife of John Girardeau^^ and who after 
Girardeau's death married Andrew Deveaux. The writer has not 

22 0/. Hist. Com'' Bk., 1701-1712, pp, 27, 28, 31, 32. 
^Frob. a. Charleston Bk., 1714-1717, p. 526. 



OLD CHARLES TOWN / 

found on the record how or when the plantation passed from this 
last Peter Le Sade but on 15 February 1734 Daniel Cartwright 
conveyed to John Beresford the Old Town plantation containing 
by estimation 710 acres which "was lately in the possession of 
Peter Le Sad planter. "^^ A few days later -20 Febry 1734— 
John Beresford conveyed the 710 acres to William Branford.^^ 
The deed states that although conveyed for 710 acres but 525 
were found. The William Branford to whom the property was 
so conveyed was the son of a William Branford who as early as 
11 July, 1694, had procured a grant for 150 acres on Ashley river 
next Southeast to the plantations of William BuU.^^ In the 
memorial of his son this 150 acres is described as "upon Ashley 
river called or known by the Indian name of Panthetion plan- 
tation and also one little Island called Panthetion Island, "bound- 
ing Westward upon "Panthetion creek." The creek separating 
Branford's grant from Bull's plantation was "Panthetion creek." 
To this grant of 150 acres the first William Branford added 41 
acres granted him 5 Deer 1696, 50 acres granted him 2 January, 
1697, 72 acres granted him 23 July, 1711, and 10 acres originally 
granted 28 October, 1676 to George Cantey and purchased by 
Branford, all of which aggregating 323 acres William Branford 
by his will dated 30 July 1717 devised to his son William Bran- 
ford;-^ who added to it 91 acres purchased 26 Jany, 1732, from 
John Brown part of 100 acres originally granted 8 July, 1696, to 
Thomas Clarke, and then the 710 (or 525) acres of old Town plan- 
tation acquired from John Beresford, and later on 20 Novr, 1747, 
73| acres part of Accabee plantation purchased from Francis 
Rose.28 

The record does not show where the first William Branford 
came from. There was a John Branford who also appeared in 
the Province at the same time and settled among the settlers of 
Dorchester on Ashley river. The Dorchester settlers came prin- 
cipally from Massachusetts and were CongregationaUsts and 
John Branford from contiguity and association seems to have 

24 M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. N, p. 189. 
^^Off. Hist. Comm"^ Memorial Bk. 7, p. 495. 
26 Grant Bk, Vol. 38, p. 146. 
-^ Met7torial Bk, Vol. 3, p. 22. 
28 Memorial Bk, Vol. 7, p. 495. 



8 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

been one of them but there is nothing the writer has found on 
the record showing precisely whence he came. William Branford 
also acquired and held for some time a tract of land in the Dor- 
chester settlement near John Branford but the writer has found 
nothing to show the exact connection between them. 

The lands near Old Town so acquired by the second William 
Branford aggregating about 1012|^ acres seem in his possession 
to have been generally known as Old Town plantation although 
the Northeastern part retained the name of "Accabee." William 
Branford left the lands to his son a third William Branford 
who died about 1772 and these lands passed to his two 
daughters, Ann Branford who married Thomas Horry and Eliza- 
beth Branford who married EUas Horry Jun"" — two brothers mar- 
rying two sisters. The lands were partitioned between the two 
sisters the Old Town part as containing 519 acres being allotted 
to Elizabeth Horry and the Accabee part containing 489j acres 
to Ann Horry who with her husband Thomas Horry on 22 No- 
vember, 1774, conveyed it to EUas Horry thus reuniting the whole 
tract in EHas and Elizabeth Horry .^^ To the tract additions 
were made by grants of adjoining marsh and of 96 acres of high 
land to the Northwest purchased from Sarah Gray the heir at law 
of John Samways,^" and the whole continued in the descend- 
ants of Elias Horry until 8 April, 1833, when the whole plan- 
tation under the name of Old Town as containing 1530j acres was 
sold to Anthony Barbot.^^ The land granted to the first Wil- 
liam Branford in 1694 thus continued in his descendants until 
1833 a period of near 140 years. Anthony Barbot in 1835 con- 
veyed to Jonathan Lucas whose Executors in 1850 conveyed to 
the late W°* McKenzie Parker from whose estate it was transferred 
some time subsequent to the War of 1861-1865. 

North of Old Charles Town or Albemarle Point on the South 
bank of the Ashley river was a point of land formed by a change 
of course in the river where after running nearly Northwest from 
Albemarle Point it turns at near a right angle to the Westward. 

The tract of land contained within this elbow was called "Ick- 
erby", "Ickerbe", 'Tckabee",^^ "Acabe" and "Accabee" and 

«» Memorial Bk., Vol. 2, p. 429. 

30 M. C. 0. Charleston Bk. Z, N°. 5, p. 382. 

31 Ibid., Bk F, N". 10, p. 349. 

32 Printed Journal of Grand Council, pp. 36, 67, 73. 



OLD CHARLES TOWN 9 

seems to have settled in spelling to the form "Accabee." In 
the grant to Jacob Neale 3 July, 1696, for 72 acres on the south 
side of Ashley river it is described as "joining to Acabee land."^^ 
By later deeds and maps the name seems also to have been given 
to the land on Charleston Neck on the North side of Ashley river 
opposite the land so termed on the South side. The writer has 
never been able to satisfy himself whether the Indian designation 
originally applied to the banks on both sides the river at that 
point, or to the "reach" of the river itself, or perchance to some 
small tribe or tribal remnant of Indians occupying the river banks 
there. However that may be the plantation on the South bank 
at the river bend in question long owned by the Rose family, 
and the plantation nearly opposite long owned by the Elliott 
family, were both known by the name of "Accabee." 

On 22 October, 1681, a grant of 190 acres on the South side of 
Ashley river at "Accabee" was made to Stephen Bull and Mau- 
rice Mathewes who seem to have abandoned it for on 1 June, 
1709 the same tract was granted for 180 acres to Charles Clifford^ 
whose representatives Benjamin Clififord with his wife Sarah, 
John Bulloch and his wife Mary and Stephen Clififord on 10 Sept' 
1718, conveyed it to Thomas Rose. 156 acres adjoining was on 
9*'' June, 1709, granted to James Bryan^^ which was on 1 Novem- 
ber, 1718 conveyed by James and Catherine Sameways to Thomas 
Rose. Eighty-nine acres additional were conveyed to Thomas 
Rose 22 Aug., 1721 by Ephraim Mikell and Mary his wife which 
seems to have included 80 acres taken up by Joseph Dalton in 
1672 and which on 26 December, 1674, he surrendered up to the 
Grand CounciP^ and the Grand Council directed to be granted 
equally between Anthony Churne and John Chambers to whom 
grants for 36 acres each were accordingly issued 21 April, 1677^^ 
and for which another grant was made to Jacob Neale on 3 July, 
1696,^^ through whom apparently Ephraim Mikell and his wife 
claimed. Thomas Rose finally purchased on 27 July, 1723, from 
Peter Le Sade 42 acres part of 100 acres granted James Le Sade 
8 Sepf, 1697, and forming part of Old Town plantation. By 
these purchases Thomas Rose acquired 477 acres covering a large 

33 Grants, Vol. 38, p. 180. ^ Printed Journal, p. 73. 

^Of. Hist. Com'' Bk F, p. 123. " c^^^; g^^ Vol. 38, pp. 11, 16. 

35 G^a„; Bk, 39, p. 32. 38 ibid.^ p, 180. 



10 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

part of the area on the South side of the Ashley river called Ickerby 

or Accabee.^^ 

Exactly when and whence this Thomas Rose came to the 

Province the writer has never been able to determine. From 

quite an early period there seem to have been several apparently 

entirely disconnected families named Rose in the Province. There 

was a Thomas Rose who as early as April, 1677, received a warrant 

for 500 acres for which a grant was made 16 June, 1677,^° on 10 

March, 1681, lot N° 64 in Charles Town was granted Thomas 

Rose Sen''*^ and 6 July, 1680, a lot was granted to Thomas Rose^ 

which on 10 June, 1689 seems to have been regranted to Thomas 
Smith.43 

On 10 April, 1684, a warrant was issued to lay off 330 acres 
to Thomas Rose as remaining due to him on record under the 
Proprietors' offers to settlers for the arrival in the Province of 
himself and several servants.** The writer has found no further 
notice of him on the record until Febry 24, 1692, when Thomas 
Rose appears as surety on a bond in the Ordinary's court*^ and 
thereafter he is mentioned in a number of cases as on bonds or 
papers in the Ordinary's court. *^ 

On 12 June, 1694, town lot N° 228 in Charles Town was granted 
to Thomas Rose Jun',*^ and this lot 228 was on 8 Aug., 1710, 
conveyed by Thomas Rose "cordwinder" to Henry Samways, 
the deed reciting that this lot had been granted to Thomas Rose 
dec''. Gentleman and was conveyed by Thomas Rose his son 
and heir.*^ On 24 February, 1701, Francis Fidling conveyed to 
a Thomas Rose a tract of 38 acres near Ashley Ferry on the 
South side of Ashley river"* ^ and this is apparently the land re- 
ferred to in the Act of 23 Deer., 1703, as then owned by "Thomas 

39 Memorial Bk., Vol. 5, p. 116. 

*« Grant Bk., Vol. 38, p. 43. 

" Ibid., p. 56. 

^ Ibid., p. 65. 

« Warrants, 1672-1679, p. 210. 

^ Ibid., p. 154. 

« S. C. Hist, b- Gen. Mag., Vol. 8, p. 170. 

« Ibid., p. 172. Vol. 10, pp. 11, 15, 17, 86, 138, 142. 

*' Ibid., Vol. 9, p. 22. 

« M. C. 0. Charleston, Bk. 1, p. 658. 

« Ibid., Bk. O, p. 128. 



OLD CHARLES TOWN 11 

Rose, Planter."^" The writer has never been able to connect 
any of these Thomas Roses with Thomas Rose who in 1718 
acquired Accabee; although it is likely he was the same to whom 
Francis Fidling conveyed 38 acres in 1703. 

According to a memorial filed by one Henrietta Rose on 26 
May, 1733^'- her "late father" Thomas Rose had died previously 
leaving her sole heir at law whereas Thomas Rose of Accabee 
would appear by St. Andrews Register to have died in December, 
1733. 

There is a statement which seems authentically to point to 
him, to be found in Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History 
of the Landed Gentry or Commoners of Great Britain and Ire- 
land published in 1838, vol. 4, p. 218 under the head of Rose- 
Cleland of Rath-Gael, referring to the family of Rose of Abingdon 
Berks, and to Richard Rose of Abingdon who died 19 April, 1719, 
leaving among other children 

"4. Thomas Rose of Charlestown South Carolina America 
settled there about the year 1700 he m. first 1704 Elizabeth only 

child of Bennet of A. K. B. [Accabee?] plantation 

situated between Ashley & Cooper rivers near Charlestown (he 
was a physician and came from Thame in Oxfordshire and was 
descended from Hugo Bennet high Sheriff for Oxfordshire in the 
region of King Henry VI and ancestor of Lord Tankerville). By 
this lady M'. Rose had issue. 

"1. Richard b. W^ October 1705 as hereafter. 

"2. Thomas m. Elizabeth and had issue Thomas 

and Elizabeth. 

"1. Sabina m. to Robert Ladson: she d. 6*^ December 1741 leav- 
ing four children. 

"2. Margaret. 

"3. Elizabeth m. Samuel Stocks leaving a son Samuel Stocks. 

"He m. secondly and had a son Francis who left three sons and 
a daughter. M'' Rose (whose will is dated 20 October 1733) 
died the 5**^ December following and was s. by his son. 

"Richard Rose of Abingdon who being adopted as heir to his 
Uncle Richard Rose of Abington come from Charlestown in the 
year 1714 to reside with him, the rest of the family remained in 

6« S. C. Hist, b' Gen. Mag., Vol. 10, p. 24. 
»i Meviorial Bk., Vol. 5, p. 118. 



12 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

America where some of their descendants are still living in great 
respectability." 

This account was doubtless written for Burke by some de- 
scendant of this last Richard Rose and whether or not it be re- 
liable as to the accounts of the family given for the early periods 
in England yet as to the family in America shows that the writer 
must have had access to writings and family data of the period 
for his statements are substantially confirmed as to Thomas 
Rose and his children by the records here. The will of Thomas 
Rose is not now to be found here of record. Many of the records 
in the Probate Court of that date disappeared during the late 
war. According to the record here Thomas Rose sen' (of St. 
Andrews Parish as the record is that Parish Register) was buried 
3 Deer., 1733, a Thomas Rose (probably his son) married Eliza- 
beth Coppin 6 March, 1725/26. Sabina Rose married Robert 
Ladson. Margaret Rose married Henry Williamson and Eliza- 
beth Rose married first James Samways and then Samuel Stocks, 
and on 23 March, 1721/22, Francis Rose the son of Thomas 
Rose was baptised. The writer has found no record here showing 
that Thomas Rose married here Elizabeth Bennet or that Fran- 
cis was the son of a second wife but records of that early date are 
wofully deficient. 

At the death of Thomas Rose in 1733 the Accabee plantation 
seems to have passed to his son Francis for on 20 Novr, 1747, 
Francis Rose conveyed 73j acres off this Accabee plantation to 
William Branford.^^ Francis Rose on 23 Febry, 1743, married 
Mary Ann Elliott daughter of Joseph Elliott.^^ She died March, 
1756, and in February, 1759, he married Sarah Balentine.^^ She 
died January, 1767, and in July, 1767, he married Elizabeth 
Ann Lining daughter of D'. John Lining.^^ She died April, 1768, 
and in April, 1771, he married Sarah Backer.^" He seems to 
have had three sons who lived to maturity Richard, Robert, and 
Thomas all of whom predeceased him and two daughters who 
survived him Elizabeth who married Abram Ladson and Sarah 

^2 Memorial Bk., Vol. 7, p. 495. 

^' S. C. Hist, b- Gen. Mag., Vol. 11, p. 62. 

5" Ibid., Vol. 14, pp. 155, 214. 

5* Ibid., Vol. 15, pp. 44, 47. 

«Ibid., pp. 50, 97. 



OLD CHARLES TOWN 13 

who married Butler. Francis Rose died in 1783. By 

his will he devised his plantation at Accabee on which he usually 
lived containing about 407 acres to his wife Sarah Rose for life 
and after her death to his grandson Francis Rose son of his son 
Robert Rose. His son Richard seems to have died without 
issue. Robert left two children Francis and Mary Ann, and 
Thomas left two daughters Elizabeth Sanders Rose who married 
D' Edward Lynah and left issue and Mary Ann Blake Rose who 
married Capt. William Miles and left issue. On 11 September, 
1802, this last Francis Rose conveyed to Richard Yeadon the 
plantation known by the name of Accabee containing 407 acres*^ 
and so far as the record shows the name of Rose of this family 
seems then to have disappeared. Yeadon on 8 May, 1818, con- 
veyed to Copeland Stiles from whom it passed in 1827 to Chris- 
tian Staley from whom it passed in 1836 to Edward C. Perron- 
neau. During the ownership of Perronneau the name of the 
plantation was changed to "Orange Grove" and it was on 1 
January, 1850, conveyed by Perronneau to the late W™ Mc- 
Kenzie Parker^^ as the plantation called "Orange Grove," with 
1202 acres of marsh attached granted by a late grant. The 
plantation has since been known as Orange Grove and on the 
late maps the creek from the river through the marsh to the 
plantation high land originally called Ickerby or Accabee creek is 
now styled Orange Grove creek. 

Adjoining the Old Town plantation as granted to James Le 
Sade and to the Southwest of it was a tract of 200 acres granted 
8 Sepf, 1697, to Francis Blanshaw on the West side of Old Town 
creek bounding South on Capt. John Godfrey .^^ In the grant to 
Capt. Godfrey^" the locality to the North is styled "Wespanee." 
This would appear to have been the Indian name of the locality. 
It is the first time it appears by name on the record. The name 
Wespanee if correctly so given in Godfreys grant was soon modi- 
fied to "Westpenny." From Francis Blanshaw the 200 acres 
passed to Peter Le Sade (brother of James) who later received 
by devise the Old Town plantation from his brother James. By 

" M. C. 0. Charleston, Bk. N, N°. 7, p. 84. 
68 Ibid., Bk. F, N°. 12, p. 148. 
^^ Grant Bk., 38, p. 364. 
6« Ibid., p. 457. 



14 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

the will of Peter Le Sade dated 9 Aug., 1716, he devised to his 
daughter Ann Girardeau the plantation containing 200 acres 
formerly belonging to Francis Blanshaw commonly called "West- 
penny" on the West side of the head of Old Town creek and also 
250 acres to be taken off the Old Town plantation adjoining the 
Westpenny^i tract and beginning at the "creek of Westpenny." 
This his son Peter Le Sade confirmed by a deed to his sister Ann 
who had since married Andrew Deveaux settling and defining 
the lines of the 250 acres taken off Old Town plantation. ^^ This 
deed states that his sister at his father's death was the wife of 
John Girardeau who had since died and his widow had mar- 
ried Deveaux. Andrew Deveaux and his wife on 21 Sepf con- 
vey Westpenny (450 acres) to John Garnier who with his wife 
Magdalen immediately reconveyed to Andrew Deveaux.^^ j^ 
seems to have been owned by M"" Deveaux for many years. It 
was this M'' Deveaux who was the friend and neighbor of Miss 
Eliza Lucas and who is so frequently mentioned in the life of 
Miss Lucas by her descendant the late M''^ St. Julien Ravenel. 
The distance between Westpenny and Miss Lucas' home on 
Wappoo was but a few miles. Andrew Deveaux died 1754 for 
in that year a partition of certain of his property was had between 
his three sons Andrew, James, and John. How the plantation 
passed from Andrew Deveaux to Alexander Perronneau J"" does 
not appear on the record but in 1772 the latter appears as the 
owner on the partition map of Old Town plantation between Ann 
and Elizabeth Horry and in December, 1774, the property is sold 
as late the property of Alexander Perronneau J'' deceased for 
424 acres to Isaac Peace*''* who on 20 November, 1776, conveyed 
it to M""* Elizabeth Branford in trust for Ann Horry wife of Thomas 
Horry for life and after her death to her heirs. ^^ 

During the ownership of the Horrys sometime later than its 
purchase in 1776 the name of the place was changed from Wes- 
panee or Westpenny to Fairfield. In 1785 Thomas Horry added 
to it 24 acres adjoining originally part of "Tiger Swamp" pur- 

^^Proh. Cl. Charleston Bk., 1714-1717, p. 526. 

62 M. C. 0. Charleston, Bk. H, p. 97. 

63 Ibid., pp. 262-268. 

6* Ibid, Bk. P, N° 4, p. 60. 
6*Ibid., Bk. A, N°5, p. 279. 



OLD CHARLES TOWN 15 

chased from Thomas Godfrey and he also purchased from Charles 
Lining a space for a family burying ground on the small island in 
the marsh to the North of "Hillsborough," where the Linings 
also had a family burying ground. 

After the death of Thomas Horry and his wife the plantations 
passed first to their son the late Elias Horry and after his death to 
his daughter Harriet the wife of the late Judge Edward Frost 
in whose descendants the place continued until 1904 when it was 
sold having been in Ann Horry and her descendants since 1776. 

{To be continued) 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE. 



1758-1788. 

Copied by Mabel L. Webber. 

{Continued from the October Number) 

65: Daniel Sinkler of this Parish, Bachelor, and Ann Dupr^ 
of this Parish, widow, were married in the Dwelling house of 
Ann Dupre of this Parish, Widow aforesaid by Banns, this Twen- 
tieth Day of August, in the Year of our Lord, 1769, by me S. F. 
Warren, Rector of this Parish. 
This marriage was \ Daniel Sinkler 

Solemnized between us/ Ann Dupre 

In the Presence of Samuel Mouzon 

Richard Blake Jun'. 

66: Stephen Guerry of this Parish, Bachelor, and Mary San- 
ders of this Parish, Spinster, were married in the Dwelling-house 
of Isaac Legrand, of this Parish, by Licence, this Ninth day of 
September, in the year of our Lord, 1769, by me S. F. Warren, 
Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was \ Stephen Guerry 

Solemnized between us/ Mary Sanders 

In the Presence of Peter Robert Jun'. 

Stephen Dumay 

67: Thomas Boone Jun' of the Parish of Prince Frederick, 
Bachelor, and Hannah Atkinson of the Parish of Prince Frederick, 
Spinster, were married in the Dwelling-house of George Atkinson, 
of the Parish of Prince Frederick, by Licence this Fourteenth 
Day of September, in the Year of our Lord, 1769, by me S. F. 
Warren Rector of St. James Santee. 
This marriage was \ Tho^ Boone Jun'. 

Solemnized between us / Hannah Atkinson 

In the Presence of Geo. Atkinson 

Jonah Woodberry 
16 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 17 

68: Thomas Denny of the Parish of Prince George, Bachelor, 
and Sarah Lee of the Parish of Prince George, Spinster, were 
married in the Dwelling-house of the Rev'd S. F. Warren of this 
Parish, by Banns, this Twenty-ninth Day of October, in the Year 
of our Lord, 1769, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of this Parish. 
This marriage was 1 Thomas Denny X his mark 

Solemnized between us J Sarah Lee 

In the Presence of Peter Guerry 

Patrick Bower 

69: David Graham of the Parish of Prince George, Bachelor, 
and Elizabeth Hunter of the Parish of All Saints, Widow, were 
married at the Dwelling-house of Percival Pawley of the Parish 
of All Saints by Licence, this Ninth Day of January, in the Year of 
our Lord, 1770, by me, S. F. Warren, Rector of St. James' Santee. 
This marriage was \ David Graham 

Solemnized between usj Elizabeth Hunter 

In the Presence of John Postell Jun'. 

Edw. Drake 

70: Thomas North of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Bachelor, 
and Rose Mclver of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Spinster, were 
married at the Dwelling-house of Joseph Willingham of this 
Parish, By Banns, this Fourth Day of March, in the Year of 
our Lord, 1770, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of St. James Santee. 
This marriage was \ Tho^. North 

Solemnized between us/ Rose Mclver 

In the Presence of Michael Boineau 

Ann Varnor. 

71: Samuel Dupre of this Parish, Bachelor, and Elizabeth 
Mary De Liesseline of this Parish, Widow, were married at the 
Dwelling-hou^e of Elizabeth Mary De Liesseline of this Parish, 
Widow, by Licence, this Twelfth Day of April in the Year of our 
Lord, 1770, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of this Parish. 
This marriage was \ Sam*. Du Pre 

Solemnized between usJ Elz'*. Mary Deliesseline 

In the Presence of Ann Du Pre 

Jonah Robert 
Benj°. Perdriau. 



18 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

72: John Jaudon of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Bachelor, 
and Mary Gaillard of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Widow, 
were married at the Dwelling-house of Mary Gaillard of the 
Parish of Prince Frederick, Widow, aforesaid, by Licence this 
Nineteenth Day of April in the Year of our Lord, 1770, by me, 
S. F. Warren, Reef, of St. James' Santee. 
This marriage was 1 John Jaudon 

Solemnized between us/ Mary Gaillard 

In the Presence of Paul Jaudon Jun'. 

Peter Michau. 

73: Charles Gee of the Parish of Prince George, Bachelor, 
and Catherine Bond of the Parish of Prince George, Widow, were 
married in the Public School-house of Prince George, by Banns, 
this Twenty Fourth Day of April in the Year of our Lord, 1770, 
by me S. F. Warren, Rector of St. James Santee. 
This marriage was 1 Charles Gee 

Solemnized between usj Catherine Bond X her mark 

In the Presence of Thomas Webb 

Peter Maume[?] 

74: Jonah Bonhost of the Parish of Prince George, Widower, 
and Rebecca Vereen of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Spinster, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of William Walker of the 
Parish of Prince Frederick, by Licence, this Twenty-Fifth Day of 
April in the Year of our Lord, 1770, by me S. F. Warren, Rector 
of St. James Santee. 

This marriage was \ Jonah Bonhoste 

Solemnized between us/ Rebecca Vereen 

In the Presence of Elizabeth Bonhost 

Jonah Robert. 

75 : Samuel Mouzon of the Parish of Christ Church, Bachelor, 
and Anne Maynard of the Parish of Christ Church, Spinster, were 
married at the Plantation of Major George Paddon Bond of this 
Parish, by Licence, this Seventeenth Day of May in the Year of 
our Lord, 1770, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of this Parish. 
This marriage was \ Samuel Mouzon 

Solemnized between us/ Ann Maynard 

In the Presence of Chas. Maynard 

Elias Lewis. 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 19 

76: Isaac Rembert of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Widower, 
and Elizabeth Varner of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Widow, 
were married at the Dwelling-house of Jacob Jeanneret of this 
Parish, by Licence, this Twenty-Fourth Day of May in the Year 
of our Lord, 1770, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of this Parish. 
This marriage was 1 Isaac Rembert 

Solemnized between us/ Eliz*. Varner 

In the Presence of Jacob Jeanneret 

W"». Walker. 

77: Henry Varner of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Bachelor, 
and Rachel Rembert of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Spinster, 
were married at the Dwelling-house of Jacob Jeanneret of this 
Parish, by Licence, this Twenty-Fourth Day of May in the year 
of our Lord, 1770, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of this Parish. 
This marriage was 1 Henry Vamor 

Solemnized between us/ Rachel Rembert 

In the Presence of Jacob Jeanneret 

W». Walker. 

78: William Yeo of this Parish, Bachelor, and Mary Smalaga 
of this Parish, Spinster, were married at the Dwelling-house of 
the Rev'd Samuel Fenner Warren of this Parish, by Banns, this 
Seventeenth Day of June in the Year of our Lord, 1770, by me 
S. F. Warren, Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was \ William Yeo X his mark 

Solemnized between us J Mary Smalaga X her mark 

In the Presence of John Drake 

Benj". Perdriaux. 

79: Anthony White Jun'. of the Parish of Prince Frederick, 
Bachelor, and Hannah Barton of the Parish of Prince George, 
Spinster, were married at the Dwelling-house of William Barton 
of the Parish of Prince George, by Licence, this Thirtieth Day of 
August in the Year of our Lord, 1770. by me S. F. Warren, Rector 
of St. James Santee. 

This marriage was 1 Anthony White Jun"". 

Solemnized between us/ Hannah Barton 

In the Presence of Joseph Dubourdieu 

William Barton 



20 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

80: Thomas Webb of the Parish of Prince George, Bachelor, 
and Mary Herries of the Parish of Prince George, Widow, were 
married in the Dwelling-house of Mary Herries of the Parish of 
Prince George, Widow, by Banns, this Thirty-first Day of Augt. 
in the Year of our Lord, 1770, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of St. 
James Santee. 

This marriage was 1 Thomas Webb 

Solemnized between us J Mary Herries 

In the Presence of Elias M'Pherson 

John Curless [?] 

81: Charles Gaillard [torn] Parish, Bachelor and Ann Dupr^ 
of this Parish, Spinster, were married in the Dwelling-house of 
Samuel Dupre, of this Parish, by Licence, this Thirteenth Day of 
September in the Year of our Lord, 1770, by me S. F. Warren, 
Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was 1 Cha. Gaillard 

Solemnized between us J Ann Dupre 

In the Presence of Jonah Robert 

Benj. Perdriau. 

82: John Clerk of the Parish of Prince George, Bachelor, and 
Mary Lambert of the Parish of Prince George, Widow, were 
married in the Dwelling-house of the Rev'd Samuel Fenner War- 
ren of this Parish, by Banns this Fifteenth Day of September in 
the Year of our Lord, 1770, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of this 
Parish. 

This marriage was \ John Clark 

Solemnized between us/ Marey [sic] Lambert 

In the Presence of John Bell. 

Lydia Perdriau. 

83: Stephen Sullivant of this Parish, Widower, and Esther 
Axson of this Parish, Widow, were married at the Plantation of 
Paul Douxsaint, Esq. of this Parish, by Licence, this Eleventh 
Day of October in the Year of our Lord, 1770, by me S. F. Warren, 
Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was 1 Stephen Sullivant 

Solemnized between usj Esther Axson X her mark 

In the Presence of Franc^. D. Champs 

Jo". Barnett. 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 21 

84: George Greenland of the Parish of St. Michael, Charles- 
town, Bachelor, and Patience Simmons of this Parish, Spinster, 
were married at the Plantation of George Simmons of this Parish, 
by Licence, this Sixth Day of December in the Year of our Lord , 
1770, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of this Parish. 
This marriage was 1 George Greenland 

Solemnized between us/ Patience Simmons 

In the Presence of John Drake 

Peter Simmons. 

85: Peter Simmons of this Parish, Widower, and Mary Green- 
land of this Parish, Spinster, were married at the Plantation of 
George Simmons, of this Parish, by Licence, this Thirtieth Day 
of December in the Year of our Lord, 1770, by me S. F. Warren, 
Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was 1 Peter Simmons 

Solemnized between us / Mary Greenland 

In the Presence of Paul Douxsaint 

John Drake. 

86: John Williams of this Parish, Bachelor, and Patience 
Conner of this Parish, Spinster, were married in the Dwelling- 
house of Edward Jerman of this Parish, by Banns, this Third 
Day of January in the Year of our Lord, 1771, by me, S. F. Warren, 
Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was \ John Williams 

Solemnized between us / Patience Conner 

In the Presence of Eliz*'* Jones 

Edw^. Jerman. 

87: Francis Redford of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Bach- 
elor, and Elizabeth Smith of the Parish of Prince Frederick, 
Spinster, were married in the Dwelling-house of Mrs. Anne Le 
Nud, of the Parish of Prince George by Banns, this Fifth Day of 
May in the Year of our Lord, 1771, by me S. F. Warren, Rector 
of St. James Santee. 

This marriage was \ Francis Redford 

Solemnized between usj Elizabeth Smith X her mark 

In the Presence of John Leger 

Joseph Gregory. 



22 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

88: John Vivane of the Parish of Prince George, Widower, 
and Mary Grant of the Parish of Prince George, Widow, were 
married in the Dwelling-house of William Allston of the Parish 
of Prince George, by Banns, this Seventh Day of June, in the 
Year of our Lord, 1771, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of St. James 
Santee. 

This marriage was \ John Vivane X his mark 

Solemnized between us/ Mary Grant X her mark 

In the Presence of Matthew Drake. 

Mary Atchinson. 

89: Clemard Griggs of the Parish of Prince George, Widower, 
and Lydia Jenkins of the Parish of Prince George, Spinster, were 
married in the Dwelling-house of Peter Lesesne, of the Parish of 
Prince George, by Banns, this Eighth Day of June, in the Year 
of our Lord, 1771, by me, S. F. Warren, Rector of St. James 
Santee. 

This marriage was \ Clemard Griggs 

Solemnized between us/ Lydia Jenkins 

In the Presence of Pet'. Lesesne 

Ann Alston 

90: William Bowen of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Bach- 
elor, and Margaret Skinner of Prince Frederick's Parish, Widow, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of the Rev'd Samuel Fenner 
Warren of this Parish, by Banns, this First Day of August, in the 
Year of our Lord, 1771, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of St. James 
Santee. 

This marriage was \ William Bowen 

Solemnized between us/ Maggtte [sic] Skinner 

In the Presence of James Bernard 

Paul Jandon Jun'. 

91 : James Calhoon of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Widower, 
and Martha Monk of the Parish of Prince George, Widow, were 
married in the Dwelling-house of William Hull of the Parish of 
Prince George, by Licence, this Fifth Day of September, in the 
Year of our Lord, 1771, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of St. James 
Santee. 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 23 

This marriage was 1 James Calhoon 

Solemnized between us J Martha Monk 

In the Presence of Edmund Carr 

John Simmons. 

92: John Shepard of the Parish of Prince George, Widower, 
and Martha Loftus of the Parish of Prince George, Widow, were 
married in the Dwelling-house of William Hull, of the Parish of 
Prince George, by Licence, this Sixth Day of September, in the 
Year of our Lord, 1771, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of St. James 
Santee. 

This marriage was \ John Shepard 

Solemnized between us/ Martha Loftus 

In the Presence of Edmund Carr 

John Simmons 

93: Thomas Spencer of the Parish of Prince George, Widower, 
and Mary Griggs of the Parish of Prince George, Spinster, were 
married at the Plantation of George Saxby, Esq. in the Parish of 
Prince George, by Licence, this Thirty-first Day of October, in 
the Year of our Lord, 1771, by me, S. F. Warren, Rector of St. 
James Santee. 

This marriage was 1 Thos. Spencer 

Solemnized between us J Mary Griggs 

In the Presence of Jehu Postell 

Arthur Delony. 

94: Paul Trapier of the Parish of Prince George, Bachelor, 
and Elizabeth Foissin of the Parish of Prince George, Spinster, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of Elizabeth Foissin of the 
Parish of Prince George, Widow, by Licence, this Nineteenth 
Day of November in the Year of our Lord, 1771 by me S. F. 
Warren, Rector of St. James Santee. 
This marriage was \ P. Trapier Jr. 

Solemnized between us/ E. Foissin 

In the Presence of Elias Foissin 

T[?] Dubourdieu. 

95: Benjamin Screven of the Parish of Prince Frederick, 
Bachelor, and Margaret Brockinton of the Parish of Prince Fred- 



24 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

erick, Spinster, were married in the Dwelling-house of Captain 
John Brockinton of the Parish of Prince Frederick, by Licence 
this Twenty Second Day of November, in the Year of our Lord, 
1771, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of St. James Santee. 
This marriage was \ Benjamin Screven 

Solemnized between us/ Margaret Brockinton 

In the Presence of W™. Davidson 

William Snow, 

96: Henry White of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Bachelor, 
and Susanna Boone, of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Spinster, 
were married at the Plantation of John Boone of the Parish of 
Prince Frederick, by Licence, this Fifth Day of December, in the 
Year of our Lord, 1771, by me, S. F. Warren, Rector of St. James 
Santee. 

This marriage was 1 Henry White 

Solemnized between usj Susanna Boone 

In the Presence of James Durand 

Rebecca Knox. 

{To be continued.) 



A LIST OF NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICERS AND PRI- 
VATE MEN OF THE SECOND SOUTH CAROLINA 
CONTINENTAL REGIMENT OF FOOT.' 

Compiled by John Bennett. 

The subjoined list of Continental soldiers, noncommissioned 
officers and private men of the rank and file, of the Second South 
Carolina Continental Regiment of Foot, and of a few others, of 
the First and Fifth South Carolina Continental Regiments, men- 
tioned in the orders of the day, is compiled from the Orderly 
Book of Capt. Samuel DuBose, of the Second Regiment,^ now in 
possession of DuBose Heyward, Esq., of Charleston, S. C. 

The period covered by this orderly book extends from January 
15 to November 22, 1777,^ during which time the 2d Regiment, 
Col. Isaac Motte, Lt. Col. Francis Marion, Major Peter Horry, 
with the 1st and 5th, Pinckney's and Huger's Regiments, was on 
garrison or post duty in and about Charleston and Dorchester. 
Col. Owen Roberts' Artillery were stationed at Ft. Johnson.^ 

The North Carolina troops under Col. Francis Nash, which had 
garrisoned Haddrell's Point,^ being withdrawn under orders to 
join Washington's army in the Jerseys, the Continental troops of 
South Carolina,^ two regiments of infantry,''' one of Rangers,® 
a regiment of artillery,^ and two regiments of riflemen,'" remained 
on command in the garrison towns of Georgetown, Charles Town 



1 The names of staff and field officers of the 2d Regt. are given in Desaussure. 
2 The book is stated to have been that of Isaac DuBose: Isaac DuBose, 

1st Lieut., 2d Regt., resigned his commission in March: DuBose's Orderly 
Book, March 7th. 

2 There is a hiatus between Feb. 14 and 24. 
* DuBose, Jan. 24, g.o. 

^ DuBose, Jan. 18, g.o.; Feb. 9, h-q. o.; the 1st North Carolina Continental: 
McCrady, 304. 

6 Now dwindled to 1200 men: McCrady, 309. 

Mst, Pinckney; 2d, Motte. 83d, Thomson. '4th, Roberts. i^Sth, 
Huger; 6th, Sumter. 

25 



26 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

and Beaufort;" while details from the several regiments did duty 
in Georgia. '2 

Of the Charles Town garrison, detachments were maintained at 
Haddrell's Point magazine, Ft. Moultrie, Fort Johnson, and 
Dorchester. 

Owing to the detached situation of these outpost defences, and 
to minimize the increasing friction arising from conflict of authority 
among mutually jealous commanding officers, ^^ General Robert 
Howe, of North Carolina, commanded in Town and at Ft. John- 
son; General Gadsden, at Ft. Moultrie and Sullivan's Island;'^ 
and General Moultrie, Nash's North Carolinians at Haddrell's 
Point. '5 

Though General Howe remained Commander-in-Chief, by 
seniority, in this Department, of the South, "until further orders 
to the contrary," Gen. Moultrie took command of the Brigade'® 
which had been allotted to Howe by Gen. Moore.'^ After the 
resignation of Brig. Gen. Gadsden, the 2d and 5th regiments were 
formed into a Brigade under Col. Isaac Huger.'^ 

From the troops garrisoned in the city, Town Guard, Magazine 
Guards and Barrack Guards'^ were regularly maintained:^*' at 

" Moultrie's Memoirs, 190, 217. 

^ In March, 700 Continental troops of South Carolina were sent into Geor- 
gia, leaving 400 or 500 for the defence of Charles Town, Georgetown and 
Beaufort: Moultrie, 190, 217. DuBose says 600 to Georgia; Feb. 26. 

13 See McCrady, 305-6-7-8. 

" Relations were so strained between Gadsden and Howe that they usually 
communicated through Moultrie: McCrady, 305. 

« DuBose, g.o., Jan. 20. 

1^ 1st, 3d and 6th Battalions: DuBose, g.o. Sept. 3.; and g.o., Apr. 28. 

1' Gen. James Moore, of North Carolina, on whom command at Charles 
Town devolved on Charles Lee's departure for the North. 

"DuBose, g.o., Aug. 22: "The Honble. Br. Gen. Gadsden having resigned 
his commission, is no longer to be considered a Continental officer." Col. 
Isaac Huger was promoted Brigadier General, Jan. 9, 1777: Moultrie, Memoirs, 
II, 146. 

" DuBose: b.o., May 25: each regiment maintained separately its own Bar- 
rack guard. 

2» DuBose, r.o., Jan. 15. " DuB., Jan. 15, etc. 22 Dyg^ jo., Jan. 18, 
19, 20. 23 £)uB., g.o., Jan. 24-6. 24 DuB., g.o., Jan. 22. =* On or near Gads- 
den's Wharf: DuB., g.o., June 27, July 3. ^e DuB., b.o., June 9. " DuB., 
g.o., Jime 19: Hon. Rawlins Lowndes, President of the Provincial Congress. 



NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICERS AND PRIVATE MEN 27 

Cumberland street magazine,^' a magazine "at Colo. Laurence's 
Brick House,"22 at the General Hospital,^ on Gadsden Wharf,^^ 
and, on occasions, at Broughton's, Littleton's, Craven's, Gran- 
ville's, Elliott's^^ and Laurens' batteries; at the Exchange ;2® the 
house of the President,^^ the State House,^^ and at Gen. Howe's 
headquarters.^^ 

Guards were also maintained, by detachments, at Dorchester 
magazine,^" Cumming's Point magazine,^' and the magazine "at 
Pritchard's Place, on south-west City Point," "the Ship-yard at 
Hobcaw,"^^ and occasionally on Morris' Island ;^^ with varying 
periods of duty, relieved weekly, fortnightly or monthly. A 
guard from the Artillery corps was outposted at Beaufort, to 
relieve the militia, in whose charge the Beaufort magazine had 
been.^ 

On February 23, by express-rider from Georgia, immediate aid 
was asked. ^^ Georgia had been invaded by a strong party from 
Florida: stated 1000 men, 500 regulars,^^ 100 Florida Rangers, 
known as the Calybites, Scovillites, or refugees,^^ a battery of 
field-pieces, and a body of Creek Indians; they had attacked one 
fort. Ft. Mcintosh on the Satilla, garrisoned by Capt. Richard 
Winn and 50 men of the South Carolina Rangers, which had 
fallen; the enemy were fast advancing into the State; other forts 
were about to be evacuated; and immediate support was neces- 
sary,^^ else Georgia was lost.^^ Detachments of the 2d and 5th 



28DuB., r.o., Sept. 12. ^^ DuB., aft. o., Jan. 19; g.o., June 19. ^^DuB., 
g.o., Jan. 22, etc. ^i DuB., r.o., March 27; b.o., May 25. ^^ DuB., g.o., 
March 1, "the Magazine at Hobcaw;" March 27, "at Pritchard's and Hob- 
caw." ^^DuB., b.o., June 14. 

^DuB., g.o., June 12; the mihtia were the Beaufort Volunteer Artillery 
Company, Capt. Wm. Harden. 

^Howe to Moultrie, North Carolina Records, XI, 709. 

^ South Carolina &= American General Gazette, Feb. 27. Parts of 14, 16 
and 60 infantry, under Col. Fuser: McCall. 

" Commanded by Cols. Thos. Brown, Robt. Cunningham, and Dan. Mc- 
Girtt, refugee Royalists of South CaroHna. 

3^ Howe to Moultrie, Feb. 23; North Carolina Records, XI. 

39 Howe: NCR: XI, 709 p.: "Added to this, the Light Horse of Georgia 
refused to do duty when ordered ... so that the Georgia Battalion, 
consisting of not over 400 men, were the only troops to defend that State 
. . . the numbers of Disaffected in that country, who, if the progress of the 



28 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

regiments, and of the 4th Artillery, four guns, two schooners, a 
sloop and store-ship, with four weeks provision for 600 men, were 
instantly despatched to Georgia/" Through lack, in part, of in- 
telligent cooperation, in part of means and munitions of war, 
the allied expedition failed. The detachment under Col. Motte 
returned immediately to Charles Town.^' 

In August a detachment^^ was despatched to Edisto, to defend, 
against row-galleys of the enemy, and privateers out of St. Au- 
gustine, a vessel lying there, and to bring her into Charles Town; 
which they did.^ 

Beyond these activities, indicated in DuBose, the story is for the 
more part one of dry routine and garrison duty. This was a 
period of trying inactivity,^ full of suppressed discontents and 
disagreements. Yet, though at first thought, b.o., g.o., and r.o., 

enemy were not stopped, would undoubtedly join them, and the probability 
of a Seaboard attack in a short time . . . made a critical situation of 
affairs." Notwithstanding Howe's statement, Baker's Georgia Light Horse 
turned out, did active service, and were disastrously defeated at Nassau 
River, by the Florida Scouts, under Brown and McGirtt: Elbert, May 19th. 

« DuBose, g.o., Feb. 24, 26. 

^ " Detachment under Col. Motte to return to Charles Town immediately 
on the transports under command of Lt. Col. Marrian:" (Marion): Journal of 
Col. Saml. Elbert, 2d Georgia Continental Regiment, officer commanding 
the Southern Expedition of 1777: March 18. The detachment from the 2d 
Regiment consisted of 107 men: DuB., Reg. Returns, March 1. 

^ 1 subaltern, 1 sergeant, 25 rank and file: DuB., b.o., Aug. 22. 

*' Edisto Inlet was particularly infested during the entire course of the 
war by privateers, "refugee boats," and Row-Galleys, coming up from St. 
Augustine, seeking cattle for the garrison there, plunder of indigo and rice, 
and revenge. These "refugee boats" were long, low, uncovered pettiaugers, 
carried from 40 to 50 men, armed with muskets and boarding-pikes, and 
manned each with 24 oars, 12 sweeps to the side, and carried, each, a six- 
pounder in the bow and a four-pounder in the stem; they were rigged with 
shding-gimter masts and latteen sails, very like the pirate galleys of the Medi- 
terranean, and were usually manned by refugee royalists who had fled from 
the State, and by Mediterranean sailors from the Greeks at New Smyrna. 
Three of these galleys combined took a vessel of 10 guns with a fighting cap- 
tain. The detachment from the 2d had its work cut out for it, had Mr. Gal- 
van's vessel of which they were in charge, been attacked, as they weie but 
scantily supplied with ammunition, 12 rounds per man: Du B., Aug. 22. 

** Col. C. C. Pinckney, of the 1st, impatient of the continued inaction, and 
desiring active service in the field, joined Washington in the autumn of 1777, 
and was present at the battles of Brandywine and Germantown: McCrady, 310. 



NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICERS AND PRIVATE MEN 



29 



brigade, general, and regimental orders, principally concerned 
with guard detail and petty court-martial, would appear to offer 
little excitement, there is, not a deal, but some: quarrels and 
assaults among officers, over gambling debts; an apparent tragedy 
arising therefrom; mad frolics among tipsy soldiery at the New 
Barracks, and upon the adjacent Green, where races were run simi- 
lar to the famous "Taking of Lungtungpen," and other pranks 
and misdemeanours perpetrated, such as stealing silk stockings 
and fine linen shirts from the officers' laundry, and having the 
worth of same estopped from their pays; fighting with citizen 
inhabitants; affronting the King's adherents; stealing the parson's 
fences; insulting the regimental chaplain ;^^ carrying parched and 
thirsty occupants of the guard-house surreptitiously to the dram- 
shop for Jamaica in the face of the regulations; stealing fruit 
from the officers' servants; firing untimely salvos through the 
barrack windows; and in various other characteristic ways dem- 
onstrating the truth of Kipling's statement that "single men in 
barracks don't grow up to plaster saints." The value of it all 
lies in the light it throws upon the gradual disintegration of mili- 
tary affairs between 1776 and 1780, when the storm broke upon a 
country unprepared. 



Apshead, John, private 
Athorph (Apthorpe), Anthony 
Ashford, William 
Anderson, Seymoure 
Allwell, John 

Baldwin, WiUiam 

Bowen, Thomas 

Batchelor, John 

Barefield, Jesse 

Bilboa, Nicholas 

Brown, John 

Blenchfield (Blancheville), James 

Bourdeshore, Peter 

Bland, Andrew 

Berlin, Abraham 

Bladwell, James 



Baptist, John, of Capt. Shubrick's 

Company 
Bryan, Bemaby 

Clark, William 
Champneys, Roger 
Carlile, John 
Clement, John 
Collins, William 
Cunningham, Robert 
Caddet, Jean 
Crawford, John 
Creighton, Adam 
Crawford, Arthur 
Clement, Benjamin 
Cowen, Francis 
Cook, John 



« Rev. Wm. Purcell. 



30 



so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 



Campbell, James 
Clark, James 
Clark, Nathaniel 

Dupuis, Frands 

Duprez, Francis — (?) Duprez or 

Dupuis 
Delaimay, Jean Baptiste or John 

Baptist Deloney 
Devinney, Peter 

Durborough, Hugh — or Durbury 
Davis, William 
Davis, John 
Dimbar, Jacob 
Downing, Timothy 
Donnom, William 
Davis, Mason 
Davis, Anson 

Evans, William 
Early, Jeremiah 

Fry, Edward or Fay 

Fagan, Peter 

Francis, William 

Foimtaine, Francis — Fontaine 

Flinn, Nicholas 

Frazer, Samuel 

Francis, John 

Fenwick, John 

Fay, Edward — Fry(?) 

Ficklin, William 

Ferguson, Alexander 

Ffillory, Stephen 

Filtner, Conrad — Filner or Fitner 

Griffin, John 
Green, Timothy 
Griffin, Owen 
Grenada, Joseph 
Greenwood, James 

Harrington, William 

Hendrickson, Andrew or Henderson 

Hawkins, John 

Hutton, George or Hutson(?) 

Hughes, Joseph 



Hysicker, Peter (Heidseicker) (?) 

Hooper, James 

Henderson, Samuel 

Hyde, WiUiam 

Horn, George 

Harris, Aaron, "of the Grenadier 

Guard" 
Husband, Laomi or Laoni 
Hasman, William 
Hill, Jeremiah 
Hughes, George 
Horn, Samuel 

Ingram, Ralph 

Jacks, John Michael, or Jean Michel 

Jaques 
Je(r)vey, Robert 
Jackson, Arthur 
Jones, William 
Johnson, Frederick 

Kelley, James 
Kelley, Woodrop 
Keaton, John 
Keel, Isaac 

Lewis, Thomas 
Lyons, John 
LeMay, John Baptist 
Lucas, Charles 
Long, Walter 

McDonald, James 

McCollock, William 

McGuinness, Jeremiah 

McDowell, John 

McCude, or McHugh, John 

McDowell, William 

McKann, William 

McDonald, Archibald 

McPharlan or McFarlane, Malcom 

McCaUister, William 

Meek, Adam 
Mills, John 
Madsden, Robert 



NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICERS AND PRIVATE MEN 



31 



Maroney, Vincent 

Murphy, Edward 

Mitchell, James 

Mossman: William, died in service, 

Sept., 1777; Capt. Harleston's 

Company (Mosiman?) 

Neat, Thomas 

Odum, or Oldham, Archibald 

O'Neal, Seymoure 

Oakes, James 

Orange, James 

O'Neal, Douglas, of Capt. Blake's 

Company: see Sergt.; Chamock's 

Co. 

Pickering, Francis 

Potts, Robert 

Pipkin, Daniel 

Pinhorn, Robert 

Penrice, or Penrhys, Edmund 

Price, Reuben 

Parsons, David 



Raybold, 

Roberts, William 

Stone, Josiah 

Simpson, William 

Smith, John 

Surgener, John 

Sample, James 

Simmor, or Seymore, Alex 

Smith, James 

SuUivant, John 

Shoore or Shore, Thomas 

Smily, William 

Simpson, Francis 

Sheedy, John 

Stanton, James 

Simpson, Robert 

Steel, John 

Smith, John 

Streetham, Steven 

Stafford, Thomas 



Thompson, John 

Thomas, RowUn or Rowland 

Thomas, PhiUp 

Therrell, Moses 

Thomas, Dempsey 

Upthegrove, Francis or Upde- 
graaf(?) 

Welch, Thomas 

Whitefish, J. 

Walker, Thomas 

Whitefield, Joshua (Whitefish, J., ?) 

Williamson, Richard 

Wihnot, Benjamin 

Whiteley, John 

Williamson, Isaac 

Wiggins, William 

Wieley, John 

WeUs, WiUiam 

Watts, Nehemiah 

Windsor, Thomas 

Weekly, John 

Wilson, John 

Witsell, John 

Wolvey, or Wolsey, John 

Corporals and Sergeants: 
Corpo. Roberts 

" Frazer, of Capt. Moul- 
trie's Company 
" Gammell, or Gamwell 
" Keel 
" Jones 

" BriUat ^ 

" KidweU 
" Amos 
" Henderson 
" Conyers 
" Teague 
" Kearsley 

" Gulps, Josiah or Joseph, 
Capt. Blake's Company 
Sergt. Simpson 
" Marlow 
" Newtown 
" Burgess 



32 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Corporals and Sergeants — Con.: Armourer Proby, John; Capt. Ash- 

Sergt. Monrow, or Munro by's Company, Regimental At- 

" Isaac Dyer, of Capt. mourer 

Motte's Company Scattering: subalterns and rank and 

" Anderson, James; Capt. file: 

Ashby's Company Pritchard, James, "of Col. Pink- 

" Holliday ney's Battalion" 

" O'Neal, Douglas; Capt. Eustas, John, private, "Col. 

Chamock's Co.; trans- Pinkney's Battalion" 

ferred from Blake's Holmes, J., "of the Fifth Regi- 

" Mathews ment" 

" Laurence Kingham, "of the Fifth Regi- 

" Coleman ment, Huger's" 

" Burthell Corker, John, "of the 1st Bat- 

" Raybold tahon" 

Sergi. Major Jacobi Gibbons, Simon, "of Col. Pink- 

" " Edmund, "of Col. ney's Battalion" 

Motte's Battalion" Sergt. Curtis, "of the 5th Regt." 

This list comprises 170 private men; 13 corporals; 14 sergeants; 
2 sergeants-major; 1 armourer; of the 2d Regiment; 200 all told, 
rank and file and noncommissioned officers; also the names of 8 
men of other commands doing duty at that time in and about 
Charles Town. 

It is to be noted that during this period of approximately ten 
months the roster of the regiment was never half full, although 
recruiting went on constantly, with a bounty ofifered by Congress 
increased by the State.^^ The average enrollment of the regi- 
ment during the period covered by DuBose was 238 men fit for 
duty; 316 fit and unfit; so that the above list recovers the names of 
nearly as many men as were actually doing duty in the regiment. 

Whatever may have been the character of these troops, theirs 
was no enviable condition. They were neither well-cared-for,^^ 

**DuB., r.o.. May 24: the bounty allowed by Continental Congress, $20 
and 100 acres of land for enlistments "during the war;" 3 years enhstments, 
$20 and twenty doUars worth of clothing per annum; South Carohna addi- 
tional boimty, $10, for "all recruits physically fit, having no sore legs, not 
less than 5 ft. 3 in. height, nor over forty-five years age." 

"DuBose: r.o., June 18; g.o., June 19; also g.o., Nov. 14 and 18. "The 
General with displeasure has observed the slovenly, indecent, dirty manner 
in which the soldiers have, of late, upon almost every occasion, appeared, 
inconsistent with health, disgraceful to the army, censurable at all times, 
and when on duty absolutely inexcusable. He laments the inattention of 



NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICERS AND PRIVATE MEN 33 

nor very well quartered, though in new barracks; they suffered 
in winter from lack of blankets and of fuel;^^ and in summer from 
the illnesses incident to the heated term of this latitude: in Sep- 
tember 56 men from the 2d Regiment were in the hospital; and, 
during the time covered by Du Bose, by regimental returns, fifty- 
two men deserted, or were "absent from duty without leave." 

Officers of Companies to their men. Gentries sent, even to the President's 
Door and to Headquarters, with bare legs, long beards, hats flapped, and 
uncombed hair; in short, in a manner so shamefully dirty and indecent that 
officers permitting it may with every appearance of justice, be accused of 
inattention and neghgence:" g.o. by Gen. Howe. 

*8 DuB. h-q. o., March 24, 26; g.o., April 15, and Oct. 22. At Col. Lau- 
rens' Brick House the guard tore out the floors, doors and window-cases for 
firewood, being without any other: DuB., g.o., March 22. 



DEATH NOTICES FROM THE SOUTH CAROLINA AND 
AMERICAN GENERAL GAZETTE, AND ITS CON- 
TINUATION THE ROYAL GAZETTE. 

May 1766- June 1782. 

Compiled by Mabel L. Webber. 

[Note: The marriage notices from these papers have been compiled by Mr. 
A. S. Salley, Jr., and were published by the Historical Commission of S. C. in 
1914. Mr. Salley gives in his introduction some account of this paper, and also 
a list of the missing numbers in the Charleston Library Society's file.] 

May 19, Mr. Joseph Moody, aged 77. (Friday, May 30, 1766.) 

At St. Augustine, the honourable John Dunnant, Esq., a mem- 
ber of his Majesty's Council, & Secretary of East Florida. (Fri- 
day, July 11, 1766.) 

In Charlestown, July 13, Miss Elizabeth Banbury. The 15th 
Capt. Robert Bond. (Friday, July 18, 1766.) 

Lieut. Theodore Winter, of the Royal American Commanding 
at Augusta. Captain Sheppard Eustace of the brigantine Phila- 
delphia-packet, of Bristol. (Friday, August 8, 1766.) 

Col. William Walter, Andrew Hunter, Esq., Deputy Collector 
of his Majesty's Customs. Capt. James Smith, of the Ship 
Union, in his passage from Jamaica to Pensacola. Richard 
Black, Esq., Comptroller of his Majesty's Customs at Beaufort. 
(Friday, Aug. 15, 1766.) 

Aug. 22, at St. Augustine, Capt. Thomas Wilson of the Artil- 
lery. Sept. 2d, in Charlestown, Mr. Thomas Lloyd, late of 
Savannah in Georgia, formerly of this town, merchant. (Friday, 
Sept. 5, 1766.) 

At St. Augustine, Lieut. & Adjunt. Wm. Sharp, of the 9th regi- 
ment. In Charlestown, Mr. Robert Stedman. (Friday, Sep- 
tember 12, 1766.) 

Sept. 14, Mr. John Denton, searcher of customs. Sept. 17th, 
Mrs. Anne Mayrant,^ wife of John Mayrant, Esq. Capt. Henry 
Constant. (Friday, Sept. 19, 1766.) 

' She was Anne Woodrap, dau. of W™. Woodrap, of Charleston, and mar- 
ried Oct. 25, 1758 {St. Philip Reg.) John Mayrant, his second wife; her age 
at death is given in the Pringle bible as 27; she was the mother of John May- 
rant of the Navy, lieut. under John Paul Jones. 

34 



DEATH NOTICES SO. CA. AND AM. GEN. GAZETTE 35 

At Beaufort, Port Royal, Sept. 22, Francis Stuart,^ Esq. (Fri- 
day, Sept. 26, 1766.) 

Sept. 30, in Charlestown, Capt. John MacLish, of the Sloop 
Fanny from Nevis. Oct. 1, at Stono, Mr. Robert Mackewn, 
aged 67. (Friday, Oct. 3, 1766.) 

Oct. 8, Mrs. Mary Hesket, aged 77, Relict of the late Mr. 
George Hesket. (Friday, Oct. 10, 1766.) 

Mrs. Mary Frost,^ aged 79. Robert Hume, Esq., Rev. Hugh 
Gaston, lately arrived from Ireland, author of A Scripture Account 
of the Faith and Practice of Christians, and other works. (Friday, 
Oct. 24, 1766.) 

Mrs. Agnes Lind, wife of Mr. Thomas Lind. (Friday, Oct. 31, 
1766.) 

Mrs. Drayton, wife of Stephen Drayton, Esq. Mrs. Hartley, 
wife of Thomas Hartley. Mr. George Wardrop. (Friday, Nov. 
7, 1766.) 

Lately at Bristol, Samuel Eveleigh, Esq. At Beaufort, Port 
Royal, Mrs. Barnwell, wife of Mr. John Barnwell Jun. Capt. 
George Perkins of the new ship, St. Helena. In Charleston, Mr. 
Wm. Watson, son of the late Mr. John Watson, of London, mer- 
chant. (Friday, Nov. 14, 1766.) 

Nov. 28th, William Elliott, Esq., aged 70. Dec. 1st, Capt. 
Silas Miles. Dec. 2d, Wm. Pinckney, Esq., Commissary General 
of this Province, in the 62d year of his age. (Friday, Dec. 5, 
1766.) 

Col. Thomas Middleton, Esq. Mrs. Elizabeth Hunt." Mr. 

^Francis Stuart, bachelor, merchant, married Dec. 28, 1752, Aime Reeve, 
spinster, (St. Helena Rec.) 

' She was the daughter of Nicholas Morecock and his wife Mary Burnham, 
of Boston, {Boston Prob. Ct., Vol. 22, p. 97) and married Charles Burnham 
the 2d, of Charlestown, S. C. before Feb. 11, 1716/17, {Charleston, S. C. Prob. 
Ct. Book, 1714-17). Charles Burnham died in 1729, and his widow married 
Joseph Townsend, Dec. 2, 1729 {St. Philip Reg.). Townsend died in May, 
1736, and October 31st of the same year, his widow married W™. Frost. She 
had issue by her first husband, only; Charles, Mary, Nicholas, Nathaniel, 
Jonathan & Margaret Burnham. Mary, who married 1738, Artemus Elliott, 
is the only one who left descendants. 

* "Thursday last died, greatly lamented, aged 73 years, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Hunt, a native of this province, and practising midwife. It is said to appear 
by an accoimt regularly kept by her, that she had been present at the birth 



36 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Thomas Clifford [this an error, and corrected in the next issue]. 
Mr. Champernown Williamson. (Friday, Dec. 19, 1766.) 

Mr. James Matthews. In Georgia, Rev. Mr. Bartholomew 
Zouberbuhler. Lieut. Mungo Graham. Mr. Charles Blundy. 
(Monday, Dec. 29, 1766.) 

In Charleston, Capt. John Rosse. Mr. George Carpenter. In 
Prince George's parish, Mr. James Hunter, formerly of Charles- 
town, merchant. (Friday, Jan. 16, 1767.) 

At his Plantation near Dorchester, Adam Daniel, Esq. In 
Charlestown, Mr. Edward Bullard, a native of Wales, aged sev- 
enty. At sea, in his passage from Savannah to this port, Mr. 
William Trewin, merchant at Augusta. (Friday, Jan. 23, 1767.) 

On Tuesday last, Mr. Caleb Lloyd, merchant. (Friday, Feb. 
13, 1767.) 

Elias Foissin, Esq. (Friday, Mar. 6, 1767.) 

Mrs. Isobel Marshal. Captain William Cutter, of the Ship 
Argo of London. (Friday, April 3, 1767.) 

In London, Mr. Henry Kennan, late of Georgia, formerly of 
this province. At Jamaica, Capt. Dickenson, of the Sloop Benja- 
min. At Ponpon, Mr, David Maybank. In Charlestown, Mr. 
William Branford. (Friday, May 1, 1767.) 

On Saturday last, 2d inst. at his plantation on the river May, 
Joseph Elliott, Esq. (Friday, May 8, 1767.) 

May 27th, in Charlestown, John Mayrant, Esq. June 2d, at 
his house on Santee, Francis Kinlock, Esq. (Friday, June 5, 
1767.) 

June 11th, Captain Thomas Morris, of the Skow Thomas, lately 
arrived here from London. (Friday, June 17, 1767.) 

Mrs. EHzabeth Marianne Marshall, wife of Mr. George Mar- 
shall. (Friday, June 19, 1767.) 

Captain George Spender, of the Ship Catherine. (Friday, July 
3, 1767.) 

At Beaufort Port Royal, William Harvey, Esq., naval officer 
and receiver-general of the county-duties at that port. At his 

of near 4000 children. She was remarkably strong and healthy, till within 
a few months before her death, and, had she taken common care of her con- 
stitution promised very fair to have lived beyond a century" (So. Ca. Gazette, 
Monday, Dec. 22, 1766). 



DEATH NOTICES SO. CA. AND AM. GEN. GAZETTE 37 

plantation near Charlestown, Mr. George Marshall, whose wife 
died about four weeks ago. (Friday, July 17, 1767.) 

Mr. Benjamin Backhouse, Tavern keeper. (Friday, August 
14, 1767.) 

August 15th, at his seat in Granville County, in the 72d year 
of his age. Captain John Bull, Esq., Brother of the late, and Uncle 
of the present Lieutenant Governour of this Province; he was the 
last survivor of all those gentlemen who went on the Expedition 
into the Cherokee Country in the winter of 1715, during the 
time of our general Indian War — In the year 1728, a Party of about 
50 Spaniards and Indians from St. Augustine made an Inroad 
into this Province as far as the Plantation of Captain Micheau, 
near Ponpon, whom they killed. Captain Bull went out with 
a Party of the Militia that was very expeditiously collected, with 
which he pursued, engaged and defeated the Spaniards and In- 
dians near Coosawhatchee, Since which Spirited Action this 
Province has been free from any Incursions from that Quarter. 
(Friday, Aug. 21, 1767.) 

In the 19th year of her age, Mrs. Anne Matthews, wife of John 
Matthews, Esq. In the 79th year of his age, Mr. Adam Stewart, a 
native of England, who came from thence in the early Part of his 
Life to this Province. He was one of those who took Major 
Bonnet and the other Pirates that were executed here about 
fifty years ago. He afterwards carried his Majesty's Act of 
Grace to the Pirates then in the Bahama Islands who there upon 
submitted themselves. (Friday, Aug. 28, 1767.) 

Mrs. Peronneau, widow of Henry Peronneau, Esq. Lieut. 
Towers of his Majesty's Ship Sardoine. (Friday, Sept. 11, 1767.) 

In Savannah: Mr. Grant, purser of his Majesty's Ship Sardoine, 
and Mr. Balguy Littlewood, merchant. (Friday, Sept. 18, 1767.) 

Mr. Francis Varambaut. Mr. John Neyle, merchant. Mr. 
Conner, Surgeon of his Majesty's Ship Cygnet. (Friday, Sept. 23, 
1767.) 

Rev. Joseph Darce Wilton, assistant lecturer of St. Philips 
parish. John Govan, Esq. (Friday, Oct. 9, 1767.) 

Dr. William Pillans [?]. (Friday, Oct. 16, 1767.) 

Mrs. Katherine Backhouse, widow of Mr. Benjamin Back- 
house. (Friday, Oct. 23, 1767.) 



38 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Mr. John Joor, Jun. of Dorchester, merchant. (Friday, Oct. 
30, 1767.) 

William Matthews, Esq. Francis Roche, Esq. Mrs. Lem- 
priere, wife of Clement Lempriere, Esq. (Friday, Nov. 6, 1767.) 

Mrs. Susanna Scot, relict of Mr. William Scot, g.ged 75 years, 
70 where of she had lived in this province. Rev. Mr. Daniel 
Wheeler, minister of the congregation of the general baptists. 
(Friday, Nov. 13, 1767.) 

Mrs. Anne Outerbridge, wife of White Outerbridge, Esq. (Fri- 
day, Nov. 27, 1767.) 

John Harleston, Esq. Mrs. Lord, wife of Mr. Andrew Lord, 
and sister of Mr. Greenwood of London. (Friday, Dec. 11, 1767.) 

{To be continued.) 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKfi 

August 1778 to May 1780. 
{Continued from the October Number) 

Fords Ferry, 16th May, 1779. 

16: Parole, Ogle. C. S., Oak., Ore. 

Brig". Gen', for tomorrow, Gen'. Butler. 
F. O. Lieu*. Col°. Henderson. 
B. M. Major Lowry. 

The Troops are to be in readiness to march this morning at 
Eight oClock with the Baggage loaded. 

The Brigade Court Martial ordered by Gen'. Butler for the 
Trial of Cap*. Barkley of the N°. Carolina Light Horse for Diso- 
bedience of Orders, have reported him guilty, & are unanimously 
of Opinion that the said Cap*. Barkley shall be cashiered — The 
General approves the Sentence. 

The four Brigades of Infantry, the Artillery & Light Troops 
composing this Army will observe the following Order of Battle 
& March until further Orders. 

The Troops of every Corps are to be told off and formed after 
their number, according to the Rules given for the formation of 
Troops. 

The S. C. B. of Confederal Troops form the Right, the N. C. 
B. of Militia the Center & the N. C. B. of Confederal Troops the 
left of the first Line, with double Intervals between the Brigades 
viz*. 60 paces, & no Interval at all between Regiments (the usual 
Intervals may be observed in the Order of Incampment.) 

The first Line of Battle will be supported by Six Field Pieces 
posted about six yards in front of it, or at such other lesser Dis- 
tance as the Nature of the Ground may require, one opposite to 
every Interval between the Brigades & two on each Wing. 

The S. C. B. of Militia will be divided into two equal Bodies to 
compose the Second Line — those two Bodies will form for firing 
as they have been shewed before, opposite to the Interval of the 
Brigades of the front Line at the Distance of two hundred paces 
in the rear of it — The Georgia Troops will form at a hundred 

39 



40 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

• paces in the rear & opposite to the Interval of the S: C: B: of 
Militia, to act as a reserve — the remainder of the Artillery will be 
posted in the front & opposite to the Center of the Second Line, 
at such a Distance as Col°. Roberts will think best-^The Light 
Infantry & Light Horse will receive particular Orders from the 
Commander in Chief or the Brigadier Gen', of the Day, & be 
posted according to Exigencies. 

The Troops will pass from the Order of Battle, to the Order ot 
March by the right or left as follows. 

P'. Advanced Guard. 

2^. One Field piece. 

3*^. One Brigade of Confederal Troops. 

4**^. Two Field pieces. 

5. Ammunition belonging to the three Pieces mentioned, & 
to the Brigade of Confederal Troops. 

6. The North Carolina Brigade of Militia. 

7. One Field Piece. 

8. Ammunition belonging to that Piece & to the Brigade. 

9. S°. Carolina Brigade of Militia. 
10. Another Field Piece. 

IL Ammunition belonging to that piece to the S. C. B. of 
Militia & to the Confederal Brigade & Georgia Troops who are to 
follow. 

12*^. The other Brigade of Confederal Troops. 

U*-^. The Georgia Troops. 

14*''. Spare Waggons for the Sick & Wounded & one half of the 
Artifices. 

IS***. Waggons loaded with Entrenching Tools. 

16*''. Provision Waggons. 

17*''. Hospital Waggons. 

18*'\ Baggage of the Military Staff of the Army beginning with 
the Commander in Chief &c. 

IP***. Baggage of the Artillery. 

20*''. Baggage of the Line. 

2P*. Quarter Master Gen'. & Stores & Waggons with the other 
half of the Artificers. 

22^. One Field Piece. 

23*'. The rear Guards. 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKE 41 

The Light Horse & Light Troops, will receive particular orders & 
Instructions relative to their place in the Order of March, from the 
Commander in Chief or Brigadier Gen^ of the Day. If they pre- 
ceed the Column their Baggage will follow that of the Artillery, 
and when they march in the rear or on the Flank, it will come 
after that of the Army. 

The Orders of the 10*^ of February last, are to be strictly ob- 
served, with regard to the mode of marching the Troops; the ad- 
vanced & rear Guards, their Flankers, those of the Line; the Gen- 
eral Duties of the Officers of the Day; the Drums & Fifes of 
Brigades & the Signals to be given in order to regulate the March. 

The South Carolina Brigade of Militia will always march from 
their Encampment by the Center of the Brigade, and pass to an 
Order of Battle as directed before. The Brigade Q"". M'. of each 
Brigade will rendezvous, with the Officer of the day at the Ad- 
vanced Guard one hour after the Departure of the Troops, in order 
to reconnoitre with the Chief Engineer & Inspector, an Incamp- 
ment for the Troops, & proper places for the Guards & Picquets, 
necessary to the Security of the Camp. 

The Artillery although divided in the Line of March will en- 
camp together, & in Case of Alarm be disposed quickly, as di- 
rected in these Orders. 

Upon the March, a Discharge of a Field piece or the Advanced 
Guards, will be the Signal for the Line to halt, & hold themselves 
in readiness to form for Battle. 

The Several Officers of the Line are to be answerable for the 
Soldiers marching ahead of the Column. 

Camp Parker's Ferry. 

17th May, 1779. 

Parole Pulasky. C. S. Party. Push. 
Brigadier for tomorrow, Gen'. Williamson. 
F O. L*. Col°. Lytle. 
B. M. Cap*. Bowie. 

The Army is to receive a Gill of Rum ^ Man immediately. 
A:0. 

The Value of all property taken from the Enemy in arms, saving 
such as have been plundered from the Inhabitants, shall be di- 
vided among the Captors — The Commanding Officer of every 
party which had or shall take any property from the Enemy, 



42 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

will immediately deliver the same into the hands of the Q: M: G. 
who will appraise such Stores as are necessary for the Army & 
keep them for its use — That which belongs to the friendly Inhabi- 
tants, to be returned to them, all others to be sold by the Q: M. 
who is to be accountable for the proceeds. 

No property is to be taken from any of the Inhabitants under an 
Idea of their being Tories, for if they have forfeited their Effects, 
it is to the State & not to Individuals. When the Safety & In- 
terest of the public makes it necessary to secure the persons & 
property of the unfriendly, a Special. Order will be given for that 
purpose. 

No Horses are to be turned into any field of Corn or Grain, 
until notice is given by the Forage Master that the same hath been 
taken for the public use & appraised. Captains & Commanders 
of Companies are to read the above Orders to their Men. 

The Gen^ Court Martial of which Major Wise is president hath 
reported — Thomas Edwards charged with Desertion & having 
joined the Enemy — acquitted — The General approves the Sen- 
tence & directs the prisoner to return to his Duty. 

18: Parole-Quaker. C: S: Quick Quill. 

Brigadier Gen' for tomorrow. Col°. Pinckney. 
F: O: Lieut. Col°. Scott. 
B. M. Cap*. Ladson. 

M: 0. Cap*. Lining of the 1^* S° CaroHna reg*. is appointed 
to act as Judge Advocate in the room of Cap*. Taylor. 

The Georgia Light Dragoons, the N. C. Light Dragoons & the 
three Companies of N. C. Militia Light Horse, are to be incorpor- 
ated under the command of Major Dekeyser. 

The Army is to be in readiness to march in an hour, The Guards 
to be immediately paraded. 

The Gen^ Court Martial of which Major Wise is president 
have further reported Matthew Morrow of the 3^. S". Carolina 
Reg. charged with Desertion. 

The prisoner pleaded Guilty & was sentenced to receive one 
hundred Lashes on the bare back with Switches. The General 
approves the Sentence and directs the Execution as soon as the 
Army halts. 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKE 43 

Three Miles from Parkers Ferry, 
Beech Hill road 

18th May, 1779. 
A. : O. A Musquet from the Park of Artillery at half an hour 
past three oClock tomorrow Morning will be the Signal for Tents 
to be Struck & Baggage loaded. The Discharge of another Mus- 
quet from the Park at half past four will be the Signal for the Line 
to move off the Ground. 

The New Guards will be paraded & told off in time to march 
in front of the Line. The old Guards come in & form as soon 
as the first Musquet is discharged. 

19: Camp, Bacon's Bridge 

Parole, Rockingham, C.S: Roebuck, Ranger. 

Brig"". Gen', for tomorrow, Gen^ Sumner. 

F: 0. L*. Col°. Wofford. 

Major for tomorrow. Major Armstrong. 

B:M. Cap*. Raiford. 
Four Light Horsemen are to be paraded with the Guards daily 
& to take their Orders from the Brig"". Gen', or Field Officer of the 
day. 

A return to be made tomorrow Morning at 6 oClock of Officers 
non-commissioned & rank & file present fit for Duty. 

20: Camp, Bacon's Bridge 

Parole, Saunders. C. S. Steel, Steady. 
Brig''. Gen', for tomorrow. Gen'. Butler. 
Major Major Eaton, 
B. M: Major Lowry. 

21. Camp at Bacon's Bridge. 

Parole Temper. C: S. Time Tart. 

Brig'. Gen', for tomorrow Gen'. Williamson. 

Col°. for the day tomorrow L*. Col°. Kirkland. 

Major Major Pinckney 

B. M. Major Bowrie. 

The Inconvenience which must unavoidably attend an Army 

incumbered with Baggage, are too obvious to require a particular 

Detail — The General hopes the bare mention thereof will be a 

Sufficient Inducement for the Gentlemen of the Army, to Subject 



44 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

themselves to a temporary Inconvenience, which in its Conse- 
quences may amply repay them. 

He thinks a Portmanteau of necessary Cloaths, a Case of Liquor 
to a Mess & a Waggon to fifty men, will curtail the Line of Waggons, 
without unnecessarily distressing the Army. 

Camp at Bacon's Bridge 
22: Parole Vigilance. C. S: Virtue Victory. 
Brig'. Gen^ for tomorrow, Gen^ Sumner. 
Col°. for the Day tomorrow, L*. Col°. Purves. 
Major for tomorrow Major Owens. 
B:M. Cap°. Ladson. 

The Army will be in readiness to march at ten oClock this 
Morning with Baggage loaded. 

Eleven oclock. The Troops are to be served with two days 
Rations of Beef which must be cooked immediately. 
Ten oClock in the Evening. 

For Command immediately L*. Col°. Henderson, Major Wise, 
eight Captains, twelve Subalterns, Sixteen Sergeants & four 
hundred Rank & file, to be ready to march precisely at three 
oClock tomorrow Morning. 

The Troops are to be under Arms tomorrow Morning at half 
past three. 

23: Parole Unanimity C. S: Union, Useful. 
Brig'. Genl. for tomorrow Gen^ Butler 
Col° for tomorrow L*. Col°. Baker 
Major Major Richardson 
B:M: Cap^ Raiford. 
The Gen^ Court Martial of which Major Wise is president is 
dissolved. 

A Gen'. Court Martial for the Tryal of all prisoners who shall 
be brought before them, will sit immediately — 

President Major Armstrong, four Captains, three Subalterns 
from the S°. Carolina Brigade, two Capt^. three Subalterns from 
the N°. Carolina Brigade, — Lieut. Jackson is desired to act as 
Judge Advocate — All Witnesses to attend. 

The Q: M: G. will employ all the Negroes who are able to work, 
in cleansing the Camp, from time to time. 

A: O. The Army with Baggage will be ready to move tomorrow 
at haft past three oClock in the Morning. 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKE 45 

24: Camp near Ashley Ferry. 
Parole C: S: 

Brig''. Gen', for tomorrow, Gen^ Williamson. 
Colonel L*. Col". Mayson. 
Major Major Fulwood. 
B:M. Cap*. Lowry. 
The Army will be served with a Gill of Rum ^ Man this Eve- 
ning. 

The Troops will be paraded at half past three oClock tomorrow 
Morning — 

25: Parole, Yamacraw. C: S: York, Yankey. 

Brig'. General] fGen'. Sumner 

Colonel L . J L*. Col°. Lytle 

-»T • > for tomorrow <- ^ . ^^^. 

Major I I Major Wise 

B:M. J [Cap°. Bowie 

The Gen^ Court Martial appointed by Order of General Lincoln 
to Genl Moultrie of which Lt. Col°. Harris was president have 
reported — Philip McGuire of the first S°. Carolina reg*. charged 
with having deserted the Service of the United States & being 
found in Arms against them — found Guilty & Sentenced to suffer 
Death by being hanged by the Neck — The Gen', approves the 
Sentence. 

William Hoyt of the first S°. Carolina Regiment, charged with 
having deserted the Service of the United States and being found 
in Arms against them — found Guilty & Sentenced to suffer Death 
by being shot — The Gen', approves the Sentence. 

The time & Mode of both the above Executions are to be 
directed by General Moultrie 

A: O. The Army is to parade at half past three oclock every 
Morning till further Orders. 

Lieut. Campbell of the N. Carolina Brigade is requested to act 
as Judge Advocate, vice Lieu*. Jackson. 

The Horses are to be put to the Waggons & they, except the 
Ammunition already made up, driven four Miles in the rear of 
the Camp immediately. 

All the provisions already drawn must be cooked immediately. 



46 



so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 



26: 



Parole, Artifice 
Brig'. General 
Colonel 
Major 
B:M. 



Camp near Ashley Ferry. 

; S: Arms, Arts. 

fGeni. Butler 

. ^ , L*. Col°. Scott 

> tor tomorrow < , _ . „ , 

Major Eaton 

Cap*. Ladson 



A Diligent Officer from each regiment must be sent over the 
Ferry, to collect all the Strollers with the Baggage, leaving only 
one Man to each Waggon. 

The Brigade Majors of each Brigade will report to the Presi- 
dent of the Court Martial the Names of the Officers for that. 

An Orderly Adjutant from Gen'. Sumners Brigade is to attend 
the Gen'. Court Martial now sitting. 

The Commanding Officers of Brigades will give Orders to dis- 
charge all the loaded Arms at five oclock this Evening. 

The Men will be drawn up for that purpose opposite to the 
Bank which incloses the field, & the Loads discharged into it 
that the Lead may be saved. 



27: 



Parole Bellona. 
Brig^ Gen'.] 
Colonel 
Major 
B:M. 



C: S: 



for tomorrow 



Bland, Bluir. 

Gen'. Williamson 
Colonel Armstrong 
Major Pinckney 
[Cap°. Raiford 

The different Corps of Light Horse now in Camp are to be in- 
corporated into one Brigade under the Command of the Senior 
Officer present to whom they are immediately to make returns — 
Lieu*. Davie of Cap*. Barclay's Troop, is appointed Brigade 
Major of the Cavalry & is to be respected accordingly. 

Ten Horsemen are to be daily paraded when the Guards mount, 
Six to attend the Officers of the day, & four to be sent to Head 
Quarters. 



28: Parole, Cowper's Hill. 
Brig"-. Gen'." 
Colonel 
Major I 

B:M. J 



for tomorrow 



C: S: Chesterfield, Crowfield. 
Gen'. Sumner 
J Col°. Thomas 
I Major Harleston 
[Caf*. Lowry 



The Troops are to have a Gill of Rum ^ Man immediately. 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKE 47 

Col°. Thompson will take Command of the S°. Carolina Bri- 
gade of Cont'. Troops & do Duty as Brigadier. 

Those Troops that have not been supplied with rice or Flour 
to Day, are to have one Day's rations of hard Bread immediately. 

29*'' M'. Johnston's House, Stono. 

Parole, Dumfries, C: S: Danby, Dooly. 

Brg^ Gen^.l fGen'. Butler 

Colonel ^ Col°. McDowell 

, - . > f or tomorrow < , , . ^ 

Major I I Major Owens 

B:M. J [Cap*. Bowie 

30*^ : Thirteen Mile House. 

Parole, Effingham. C : S. Elbert, Eden. 



Brig^ Gen'.] 

Colonel I . ^ 

, ^ . > for tomorrow 



Maj'or 
B:M. 



Genl. Williamson 
L*. Col. Wofford. 
I Major Richardson 
[Cap"^. Ladson. 



The Gen^ has been pleased to re-instate Cap". Barclay of the 
N. CaroHna Light Horses, who was cashiered by the Sentence 
of a Brigade Court Martial the 16*^ Instant. 

The Camp Picquets are to be increased to 350 Rank & file, they 
will be constantly on their Arms, & be ready to march at a Mo- 
ment's warning; the Officers will parade them every two Hours, 
& call the roll, the utmost Attention is expected as much may 
depend on their punctuality. 

Field Officers to command the Camps Picquets to Day — Colonel 
Armstrong & Major Eaton. 

The Camp Picquets are to be paraded together & the Officers 
posted in Battalion Morning & Evening. 

The Gen^ Court Martial of which Major Armstrong is presi- 
dent, have reported— Alexander McMullen of the 6*^ S° Caro- 
lina Regiment charged with Desertion — found guilty & Sen- 
tenced to receive 100 Lashes on his bare back with Switches — The 
General approves the Sentence. 

Archibald Brown of the 6th S°. Carolina regiment, charged with 
Desertion found guilty, & Sentenced to receive 100 Lashes on his 
bare back with Switches — The Gen^ approves the Sentence. 

Danier Fuller of the 3*^. S° Carolina reg*. charged with Deser- 
tion (the prisoner pleaded guilty) sentenced to receive 100 Lashes 



48 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

on his bare back with Switches — The General approves the 
Sentence. 

Buckner Baker, of the 6*"^ S°. Carolina reg*. charged with De- 
sertion (the prisoner pleaded guilty) sentenc'd to receive One 
hundred Lashes on his bare back with Switches — The Gen^ ap- 
proves the Sentence. 

William Powers of the 4*^ N. Carolina Battalion charged with 
Desertion, found Guilty & Sentenced to receive 100 Lashes on 
his bare back with Switches — The Gen', approves the Sentence. 

Isaac Moore of the 3^. S°. Carolina reg*. charged with Deser- 
tion found Guilty & Sentenced to receive 100 lashes on his bare 
Back with Cats — The Gen^ approves the Sentence. 

The above Executions to be inflicted immediately. 

31 : Thirteen Mile House. 

Parole-Fairfax. C: S: Forty, Five. 

The Troops to be served with a Gill of Rum ^ Man this evening. 

For Camp Picquet to night, L*. Col°. Henderson & Major 
Pinckney. 

The Army will march by the right tomorrow Morning at Seven 
oClock. 

An Officer from each regiment is to be sent to Ashley-Ferry 
tomorrow Morning at Day break, to order the Tents up. 

(To be continued) 



LIST OF PUBLICATIONS 

OF THE 

SOUTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



COLLECTIONS 

Vol. I, 1857, $3.00; Vol. II, 1858, $3.00; Vol. Ill, 1859, 
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THE 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 

MAGAZINE 




PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY THE 

SOUTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



VOLUME XVI, No. 2 



APRIL, 191 5 



Entered at the Post-office at Charleston, S. C, as 
Second-Class Matter 



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE. 

Joseph W. Barnwell, Henry A. M. Smith, 

A. S. S ALLEY, Jr. 

EDITOR OF THE MAGAZINE. 
Mabel L. Webber. 



CONTENTS 

Old Charle? Town and its vicinity, Accabee and Wappoo 
Where Indigo Was First Cultivated, With Some Adjoining 
Places in Old St. Andrews Parish 49 

Parish Register of St. James', Santee 68 

Order Book of John Faucheraud Grimke 80 

Death Notices From the South Carolina and American 
General Gazette, and its Continuation the Royal Gazette . 86 

Historical Notes 93 



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free use of the Society's library. 

Any member who has not received the last number will 
please notify the Secretary and Treasurer. 

Miss Mabel L. Webber, 

South Carolina Historical Society, 

Charleston, S. C. 



The South Carolina 

Historical and Genealogical 

Magazine 

VOL. XVI APRIL, 1915 No. 2 



OLD CHARLES TOWN AND ITS VICINITY, ACCABEE 
AND WAPPOO WHERE INDIGO WAS FIRST CULTI- 
VATED, WITH SOME ADJOINING PLACES IN OLD 
ST. ANDREWS PARISH. 

By Henry A. M. Smith. 
{Continued from the last number) 

Lying to the Southeast of Albemarle Point, across the creek 
and marsh, was another point or tract of land which was taken 
up by the Lords Proprietors for a farm or plantation to be culti- 
vated at their expense, and for their own personal profit, or loss, 
as the case might be. Their first agent for that purpose was 
Joseph West afterwards Governor and Landgrave. When the 
expedition to settle the Province was about to sail instructions 
were issued to West to furnish himself with "Cotton seed, Indigo 
Seed, Ginger Roots, w'^^ roots you are to carry planted in a tubb of 
earth, y* they may not dye before yo'' arrivall att Port-Royall; 
alsoe you may in another tubb carry some Canes planted for a 
tryall — alsoe of y^ several sorts of vines of that Island & some 
Ollive setts." 

On arrival he was to take up as much land for the Proprietors, 
uses as would come to at 150 acres per head of 30 servants. 

"On this Land you are to Cause to be erected convenient 
housing for Yo' selfe & yo*" Servants, making them warm & tyte 

As soon as yo' houses are built you are to sett yo' 

49 



50 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

people to falling and clearing yo'' land. . . . planting Indian 
Come, Beanes, Pease, Turnipps, Carretts, & Potatoes for Pro- 
visions. . . . you are never to thinke of making any Comod- 
ity yo'' business further than for experience sake & to have yo' 
stock of it for planting en crease till yo^ have sufficiently provided 
for y® belly by planting store of provisions w'''^ must in all your 
contrivances be looked upon by yo" as y^ foundation of yo' planta- 
con. Iff yo" have time yo" may fence in a small peece of ground 
for ye reception of ye Cattle we shall cause to be brought from 
Virginia, and to putt them in all night. "^® 

It was evidently the intention of the Proprietors that this 
"experimental farm" (preceding by over two centuries those 
which the State of South Carolina has of late initiated) was for 
three purposes, viz: for helping to provide food for the infant 
settlement, then as a means of furnishing seeds and stock for 
sale to intending settlers wherewith to begin their own agricultural 
operations, as well as for the ascertaining for the common benefit 
the proper crops suitable to the climate and soil and the right 
seasons for planting and cultivating in this new region. Per- 
haps also for the profit in the planting enterprise itself in the sale 
of its products. The profit apparently really looked forward 
to by the Lords Proprietors in incurring the great expense of 
planting and supporting a colony to take up the lands in this 
new country was to arise from the inducing settlers to come who 
would purchase or lease the lands and develop the Province. 

Upon the arrival of the expedition at Albemarle Point, West 
seems to have at once followed his instructions. The place selected 
by him lay across the creek and marsh from Albermarle Point 
to the Southeast. It was the same place known in later years as 
"Hillsborough" plantation and is now in large part the site of a 
negro village or settlement called "Maryville." 

According to the general plan made by Culpepper in 1671 there 
was taken up at that place for the purposes of a plantation for the 
Proprietors 420 acres, the houses and cleared land were upon the 
high land at the junction of the creek and the river. There is 
another map made by Culpepper, 7 March, 1672/3 showing 44^ 
acres being the "Plott of the Lords Prop''^ plant." representing 
the "cleare Land belonging to the Lords proprietors of this Province 

«« C<>//"« Hist. Soc. of S. C, Vol. 5, p. 125. 



OLD CHARLES TOWN 



51 




MAP OF THE PROPRIETORS' CLEARED LAND 



52 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

wherein Colo. Joseph West now Liveth. "" This map shows a 
rail fence around, with the buildings and gardens in front towards 
the river. 

West wrote in 1670 that some live cattle had been brought from 
Virginia of which he kept some for the plantation, and that the 
corn and other things planted at their first coming were thriving 
well but that the garden seeds were not good.*^^ The next spring 
viz: 21 March 1670/1 West wrote to Lord Ashley: 

" Now I shall give yo' Honn' a brief e Acco*of yo"^ ownePlantacon. 
I have taken up for present planting about 300 Akers of ground. 
I have cleared this yeare about 30 Akers and built convenient 
Houses for ourselves & serv*« and Inclosed the Houses w*** Pallisa- 
does w* doth containe betweene 6 & 700 foote and have soe placed 
them y* one Angle shall clear another soe y* wee doe not feare all 

y** Indians y* shall attempt us one Capt. Godfrey 

arrived here from Barbadoes to manage S' Peter Colletons interest 
in yo'' Partnerships, who I believe to be a very honest man and a 
good Planter, I am very glad of his assistance. . . . Wee 
intend to plant most of our ground this yeare with provisions, it 
being the Life of a new settlement to provide in the first place for 
the belly. . . . Our stock doth thrive very well especially 
Hoggs. "«9 

The house — the chief house — on this plantation was occupied 
by West who seems to have continued to occupy it after he became 
Governor in the spring of 1671, and whilst he was Governor dur- 
ing his first two administrations and perhaps until his retirement 
in 1682. In the minutes of the Grand Council for 9**^ Sept' 1675 
it is spoken of as "the Lords proprietor plantation where the 
Governor now resides" and again in the minutes of 11 Sept', 
1675 as "the Lords proprietors plantation whereon the Governor 
now dwells."^'' 

West was the agent of the Lords Proprietors, managing their 
planting enterprise at the same time that he was the Governor of 
the Colony. His occupancy may have been in the first capacity. 
But the residence thereon whilst the seat of government con- 
tinued at Old Charles Town was so identified with the governor- 
ship that the point on which the house was located was called 

«' Coll''^ Hist. Soe. oJS. C, Vol. 5, p. 421. «9 Ibid., p. 297. 

" Ibid., p. 203. ^° Printed Council, Journal, p. 76. 



OLD CHARLES TOWN 53 

"Governor's Point," the creek between it and the Town was 
called "Governor's Creek," and on the maps of the period the 
house is marked and designated as "Governor's House." 

To provide for ready communication between the Proprietors 
plantation and the Town on Albemarle Point a bridge at the 
public expense was proposed and seems to have been built across 
the creek and marsh. Quite an undertaking even for a much 
older and more assured settlement than that at Albermarle Point 
in 1672.''* It was probably a simple bridge of the "squared 
foot log" kind supported on stilts or braces over the marsh. 

When the seat of government was transferred to Charles Town 
on the Oyster Point the Governor's residence at the plantation 
of the Proprietors probably ceased. It was in all respects more 
desirable for him to reside in the new town. Much later — in 1712 — 
the General Assembly of the Province purchased a piece of land 
and constructed a mansion for the Governor at the site of the 
present Country Club just above Magnolia Cemetery which 
was known as the Governor's house and in 1721 was sold to Gover- 
nor Robert Johnson. The planting enterprise of the Lords 
Proprietors does not seem to have been profitable In June, 
1675 the Earl of Shaftsbury writing to the Governor and Council 
says, "I make this faire proposall to you that if you and the 
people there undertake to pay what is owing from us to Coll. West 
and cleare those debts which have been contracted by yourselves 
and charged upon us in Carolina or elsewhere I doubt not but to 
prevail with the rest of the L''^ Prop" to forgive you all the debts 
you owe us, and for a part of satisfaction to Coll. West to throw 
in our private plantacon too, that he hath hitherto managed for 
us and therewith put an End to our Bargain with him as our Store- 
Keeper or Agent. "^2 

This offer the Governor and Council seem to have declined.''^ 

What was subsequently done for some years about the plan- 
tation does not appear upon the record. The Shaftsbury papers 
terminate in date about 1675. The Province seems soon to have 
become self supporting so far as provision "for y^ belly" was 
concerned and there is nothing to show that any Agent to con- 

" ColF"^ Hist. Soc. of S. C, Vol. 5, pp. 393, 409, 415. 
'2 Coll"^ Hist. Soc. of S. C, Vol. 5, p. 467. 
^^ Printed Journal of Grand Council, p. 76. 



54 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

duct the enterprise was appointed after Governor West's retire- 
ment, which appears to have been about 1682. The next thing 
that appears upon the now accessible record with regard to the 
area taken up for the Proprietors plantation is a grant to John 
Godfrey for 518 acres made 14 July 1696/7. '^^ This grant according 
to its boundaries took up the entire area (and more) covered by 
the lines of the Proprietors plantation as shown on Culpeppers 
map of 1671. A copy of Culpeppers map is the frontispiece to 
the fifth volume of the Collections of the Historical Society of South 
Carolina. The frontispiece to the Year Book oi the City of Charles- 
ton for 1883 is a map of the vicinity of the City of Charleston 
with the lines of settlements and lands taken up, laid down ac- 
cording to the lines given on Culpeppers map. 

On 11 May, 1699 another grant w^as made to John Godfrey 
for 974 acres. ^^ 

This grant according to its boundaries covered the same land 
included in the prior grant for 518 acres with a very large addition. 
It seems to have included not only the Proprietors' private plan- 
tation but also the lands marked on Culpepper's map as having 
been laid out for Thomas Finden, Teague, Oliver Spencer, Joseph 
Dowden, Capt. Giles Hall, Samuel Boswood and others and John 
Maverick & Company. Why the private plantation of the Lords 
Proprietors was thus turned over to John Godfrey the records 
we have do not disclose. As has been seen its operation does not 
appear to have been profitable. The Earl of Shaftsbury the most 
active of the Proprietors in forwarding the colony had as early 
as 1675 settled for himself a seignory of 12,000 acres near the head 
of Ashley river and was engaged in its development.''^ 

Sir Peter Colleton, another active Proprietor, had a seignory of 
12,000 acres laid out for himself at Fairlawn near the head of 
Cooper river.''' None of the other proprietors seem to have taken 
any very active interest in the working of this private plantation, 
and as we have seen in 1675, they were willing to turn it over with 
its houses and improvements to Coll. West in part satisfaction of 
his claims. It is possible that the lands like the lots at Albemarle 
Point were given up in order to be regranted: or it may be there 
was some debt due to John Godfrey or his father in consideration 

7* Grants, Vol. 38, p. 327. "5. C. Hist. 6- Gen. Mag., Vol. 11, p. 75. 

'^Ibid., p. 371. "Ibid., p. 193. 



OLD CHARLES TOWN 55 

of which he was allowed to take out a grant of the property. 
In 1671 Col. John Godfrey, the father of the new grantee, had 
been sent out to the Colony to look after Sir Peter Colleton's 
interest in the management of the plantation and there may have 
been some claim on his part which was recognized for his son. 
The houses and improvements were probably not of any great 
value. 

The first mention of the first John Godfrey the writer has 
found on the record in South Carolina, shows him as in 1665 
living in All Saints Parish in Barbadoes in possession of a planta- 
tion and negroes and carrying on a sugar manufacturing business 
in copartnership with Thomas Dowden.^^ He is then styled 
"Captain." He came to the Province about May, 1671 as the 
representative of Sir Peter Colleton and to assist Governor West 
in the management of the Proprietors private plantation. 

On his coming to the Province, he is styled "Capt. John God- 
fj.gy"79 jjj ^jjg minutes of the Grand Council in which he sat as a 
deputy and so continues to be styled until the minutes of 6 July, 
1672 when he is styled "Major" until the minutes of 22 July, 
1672 when he is styled "Lieut. Coll.," but to what his advance- 
ment in rank was due does not appear. He took a very active 
part in the affairs of the Province and was evidently a capable 
man. He received several grants one for 330 acres on Wando 
river*" on the East side of that river and one for 300 acres "near 
Charles Town" dated 24 Oct^ 1677.«i As in 1677 "Charles 
Town" meant the town at Albemarle Point it must have been 
located on the South side of the Ashley river although the location 
is not stated definitely in the grant. Lt. Col. John Godfrey died 
about 169P" leaving a son generally styled "Capt. John Godfrey" 
and it was to this last that the abovementioned grant for 974 
acres was made. A number of grants were made to him in the 
same vicinity about that time, viz: 

'* Of. Hist. Comm^, Bk. G., p. 72. 

^^ Printed Journal of Grand Council, p. 3. 

80 Grant Bk., Vol. 38, p. 50. 

8' Ibid., p. 34. 

82 ColV"^ Hist. Soc. of S. €., Vol. 5, p. 229. 



56 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Acres 

13 April 1694'^ (formerly granted to Oliver Spencer) 40 

11 May 16998* 974 

11 Jany 170085 40 

6 Novr 170486 300 

6 Octr 17048' 370 

add granted to his father 

17 April 167688 100 

2 April 167989 300 

2124 

The grant made 6 Octr, 1704 for 370 acres is a good illustration 
of how at that date grants were made and abandoned and the 
lands then regranted. On 27 Sepf, 1677 a grant was made to 
Sir Peter Colleton, and his two brothers of 373 acres described 
as "near unto Ashley River commonly called by the natives by 
the name of Waheawah."^" The Colletons took possession and 
no doubt occupied it for it apparently lay on the small creek that 
runs into Wappoo creek from the North and which has ever since 
been known as Colleton Creek or Mill Creek. They apparently 
abandoned it and on 2 April, 1679 a grant was made to John 
Stephens of 370 acres^^ "upon a marsh being a branch of Wappoe 
Creek" which apparently was the same as the Colleton grant. 
Whether by abandonment or sale, Stephens seems to have given it 
up and on 28 Ocf 1696 a grant was made to Col. Robert Gibbes 
of 370 acres^- near Ashley river on the North side of Wappoo 
Creek bounding North on "Yantee" plantation, apparently the 
Indian name for the Proprietors private plantation on which the 
Colleton grant should originally have boimded to the North and 
which this Gibbes grant seems to have succeeded. 

Gibbes in turn abandoned or sold for on 6 Ocf, 1704 a grant is 
made to Capt. John Godfrey for 370 acres on a marsh of Wappoo 
Creek which as near as can be computed by comparing other 
grants must have occupied the position of the original Colleton 
grant of Waheawah. 

83 Grant Bk., Vol. 38, p. 100. 88 jbid., p. 22. 

s^bid., p. 371. 89 ibid.^ p. 34. 

85 Ibid., p. 390. 9" Ibid., p. 6. 

86 Ibid., p. 457. «Ibid., p. 34. 
" Ibid. 92 Ibid., p. 319. 



OLD CHARLES TOWN 57 

Capt. John Godfrey died about 1717 leaving a will whereby he 
devised 500 acres from his lands on Ashley river to his oldest son 
the third John Godfrey and the remainder to his widow for life 
and at her marriage or death to go to his surviving children to be 
equally divided among them.^^ The will was not executed in 
proper form to be valid to devise his lands which accordingly 
descended to his eldest son and heir the third John Godfrey. 
This last to carry out his fathers will nevertheless had the lands 
surveyed out and after setting off the 500 acres devised to himself 
had the remainder divided out in seven equal shares of 224 acres 
each and allotted them one to each of his father's surviving chil- 
dren viz to John Godfrey himself, to his brothers Richard Godfrey, 
and Benjamin Godfrey, and to his four sisters, Jane who married 
first James Stanyarne and secondly — Monger, Mary who married 
William Cattell, Elizabeth who married first Charles Hill a 
Chief Justice of the Province and second Samuel Quincy ; and Sarah 
who married Benjamin Whitaker also a Chief Justice of the Prov- 
ince. A copy of the plat showing the subdivisions is recorded 
in the Mesne Conveyance ofl&ce for Charleston County. ^^ Of the 
500 acres for himself under his fathers Will there was set aside 
to John Woodward (a grandson of Lt. Col. John Godfrey and first 
cousin of John Godfrey 3*^) 350 acres under some arrangement or 
sale between them.^^ The 1568 acres divided between the sur- 
viving children of Capt. John Godfrey were allotted as follows: 

Lot N° 1 to Benjamin Godfrey. 

Lot N? 2 to Elizabeth Hill. 

Lot N° 3 to John Godfrey. 

Lot N° 4 to Jane Stanyarne. 

Lot N" 5 to Richard Godfrey. 

Lot N° 6 to Mary Cattell. 

Lot N° 7 to Sarah Whitaker. 

Lot N° 2 which fell to EKzabeth Hill was by John Godfrey her 
brother conveyed to Charles Hill her husband 15 August 1719.^^ 
Hill also purchased from John Woodward 70| acres of that part 
of the 350 acres which John Godfrey had conveyed to Woodward 

'3 M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. M. M., p. 30. 
8^ Bk. M. M., supra. 
3* M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. D, p. 173. 
98 M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. D, p. 282. 



58 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

being the part covering the ''Governors Point." He also pur- 
chased from Benjamin Godfrey 6 acres, a small triangle, off lot 
N° 1 which had fallen to Benjamin Godfrey. ^^ The part so ac- 
quired by Hill aggregating some 300| acres was occupied by Hill 
during his life and then acquired the name of ''Hillsborough" 
and included "Governor's Point," — and the greater part of the 
Proprietors original private plantation. After the death of 
Charles Hill about 17 — his widow acquired the rest of Benjamin 
Godfreys lot N° 1 and the plantation at her death passed to her 
daughter Sarah Hill who married D'' John Lining.^^ Charles Hill 
was the Chief Justice of the Province 1722-1724, just after the 
revolution which overthrew the Proprietary Government. He 
was long a prominent citizen in the Province. On 29 December, 
1710 there was executed a mortgage from Charles Hill of Kingston 
in Jamaica appointing his wife "Jone Hill now at Hillgrove 
plantation neare Charles Towne in South Carolina "to manage 
"my plantation Called Hillgrove near Charles Towne in South 
Carolina."^^ Whether this was the same Charles Hill and "Jone" 
his then wife the writer has not been able to determine. He 
married Elizabeth Godfrey in January, nM.^"" 

D"" John Lining who married Sarah Hill was a physician of high 
standing in Charlestown, and the ancestor of the family of that 
name in lower Carolina. A sketch of his life and accomplishments 
will be found in Ramsay's Hist, of So. Ca., Vol. 2, pp. 111-481, and 
in McCrady's Hist, of S. C. under the Royal Government, p. 414. 

The Hillsborough plantation continued in the Lining family 
until 1 January, 1834 when it was sold by the Executrix of Charles 
Lining the last owner of the name'°^ who up to his death had 
still occupied it as his residence and home. From the first grant 
in 1699 to 1834 it had been in John Godfrey and his descendants. 
The family burial place of the Linings (and it may be of the Hills 
and Godfreys) was on a small island in the marsh just north of the 
plantation on which there was a large vault. This vault was 
broken open according to report by a marauding party of the 

»' Memorial Bk., N°. 5, p. 220. 

88 M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. P. P., p. 165. 

^W_ff. Hist. Comw Bk. marked Mortgages, 1709—1719, p. 107. 
^""Prob. Ct. Charleston, Bk., 1751-1754, p. 68. 
i" M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. W, N°. 10, p. 539. 



OLD CHARLES TOWN 59 

enemy after the evacuation of Charleston in 1865 and the con- 
tents rifled and desecrated. It presented in the present writer's 
early years a most melancholy sight and became so the scene of 
irreverent and spoliating visits that some years ago as the writer 
was informed a member of the Lining family had the contents all 
securely buried and the walls of the vault levelled. 

It was on this Island that Charles Lining in 1801 sold to Thomas 
Horry the then occupier of the "Fairfield" or "Westpenny" 
plantation a family burial place. 

By the Executrix of Charles Lining the Hillsborough plantation 
was sold to Edward B. Fishburne who sold to Elisha McBurney 
and after some intermediate conveyances the plantation became 
the property of the late Alexander H. Brown of Charleston. From 
him it passed to C.C.Bowen sometime Sheriff of Charleston County 
during the Carpet-bag or Republican (in its obnoxious party 
meaning in the South between 1868-1876) ascendancy by whose 
widow it was in large part divided up and sold out to negroes 
and the private plantation of the Lords Proprietors has thus be- 
come the site of a negro settlement or village generally now 
called "Maryville." Of the 350 acres so conveyed to John Wood- 
ward he conveyed on 11 May, 1723, 193| acres to Richard Wood- 
ward at whose death in April, 1725 it passed under his will to his 
daughter Mary Woodward, but his widow Mrs. Sarah Woodward, 
who was the guardian and Trustee of her daughter resided on the 
place.J02 

This plantation immediately adjoined the plantation of Col. 
George Lucas on Wappoo where his daughter Miss Eliza Lucas 
then resided with her mother and this M" Woodward was the 
friend of that name referred to in the life of Eliza Lucas by M™ 
Ravenel. 

This place was subsequently acquired by William Harvey 
passed under his will about 1783 to Charles Elliott and a large 
part of it was purchased before the late war by the late William 
Ravenel of Charleston. The place where the house now stands 
would appear from the old maps to be the place where it stood in 
M" Woodward's time. 

Lot N° 3 fell to John Godfrey whose eldest son John (John 
Godfrey 4*'') died intestate without children so that his lands 
including lot N" 3 went to his uncle Richard Godfrey as heir at 

102 Memorial Bk., N°. 5, p. 329. 



60 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

law. Richard Godfrey had already purchased from his sister 
Jane Stanyarne 200 acres of lot N° 4 which fell to her and on 19 
Sepf 1752 he conveyed to D'' John Lining 200 acres of N° 3 and 
106 acres of N° 4.^°^ The plantation so conveyed of 306 acres 
was ever after (and no doubt before) known as "Tiger Swamp" 
plantation or as spelled on the old plats "Tyger Swamp " probably 
a relic of the days when the cougar locally called "tiger" still 
hung around the settlement. By D' John Lining's Will "Tiger 
Swamp" passed to his wife Sarah Lining. On 19 May, 1761 
M" Sarah Lining conveyed "Tiger Swamp" to Francis Rose 
of Accabee^"^ who seems to have turned it over to his son Thomas 
Rose in his life time and in his will devises it to his two grand- 
daughters Elizabeth Clark Saunders Rose and Mary Ann Blake 
Rose the daughters of his son Thomas Rose as his land in St. 
Andrews Parish 307 acres whereon his son Thomas usually resided. 
It seems to have been allotted in some way to Elizabeth Saunders 
Rose who married D"" Edward Lynah for on 1 March 1799 D' 
Lynah and his wife conveyed it to Peter Smith^"^ whose repre- 
sentatives Ann Smith and Benjamin John Smith on 4**^ Febry 1828 
conveyed it to Edward Moodie from whom it passed on 18 March 
1834 to Gilbert Geddes. 

Richard Godfrey to whom lot N° 5 fell apparently acquired lot 
N° 6 from his sister Mary Cattell and lot N° 7 which fell to Sarah 
Whitaker had been on 2 July, 1722 transferred to her brother 
John Godfrey"-"^ at the death of whose son John without issue 
it apparently went to his uncle Richard Godfrey as heir at law so 
that Richard thus became possessed of lots 5, 6, and 7 aggregating 
672 acres.'"^ Lot 7 was apparently disposed of by him or his 
descendants intact as 224 acres for as such it was owned at the 
close of the eighteenth century by Jane Elizabeth Dill under the 
name of "Silk Hope. " By her it was sold to George Rivers who 
sold to Benjamin Stiles who in 1822 sold to Edward B. Lining 
and it has been since transferred to different successive owners. 
By some curious transmutation the name on the latest deeds has 

iM M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. M. M., p. 30. 

lo^Ibid., Bk. W. W., p. 708. 

i»5 Ibid., Bk. C, N°. 7, p. 190. 

">6 M. C. O. Charleston, Bk., B.^, p. 20. 

i"Ibid., Bk. Z, p. 476. 



OLD CHARLES TOWN 61 

been changed from "Silk Hope" to ''Sylcope. " From lot 6 
Richard Godfrey sold 106 acres to D' John Lining^°^ which there- 
after formed a part of Tiger Swamp plantation and the remainder 
of lot 6 with lot 5 became later subdivided into two plantations the 
Westernmost known as Littlebury and the Easternmost as " God- 
freys" or "Quartermans" and later as "GeddesHall" after both 
of them together with Tiger Swamp became in the first quarter 
of the nineteenth century the property of John Geddes. 

The tract of 350 acres conveyed to John Woodward by John 
Godfrey or that part of it which was not embraced in the convey- 
ance to Richard Woodward, being the part on Ashley River to- 
gether with the adjoining 150 acres reserved by John Godfrey 
passed later to William Harvey and from him to Thomas Elliott 
and then apparently shortly before or after 1800 to John Hume 
who in 1823 gave it to his daughter Ann Simons wife of Sedgwick 
Lewis Simons. ^°^ M''^ Simons in 1851 conveyed it to the late 
J. E. Moore Mitchell who in 1852 sold to Miss Martha Prioleau. 
The place was long the residence of William Harvey. There is 
nothing now left on the site of the old house but a foundation of 
"tabby" or "tapia" work; but 40 years ago there could still be 
seen the remnants of a considerable garden and settlement. It is 
the intervening house site between the old residence of the late 
George I. Crafts just North of the public road to the bridge and 
the Hillsborough house site. 

The point of land on the North side of Wappoo Creek at its 
junction with Ashley river before referred to in this article as 
erroneously at one time confused with Albemarle Point was 
according to Culpepper's map of 1671 designated as held by Sir 
John Yeamans to the extent of 70 acres. There Sir John Yeamans, 
who was Governor of the Province 1672-1674 had a "Countrey 
house" palisaded and garrisoned by his negroes."" What dis- 
position was made by Sir John Yeamans of this property does not 
appear upon the record. He makes no mention of it in his WilP" 
and indeed acquired it only after the date of his will. It may have 
been disposed of during his life (he died in 1674^^-) or passed as 

'08 AI. C. 0. Charleston, Bk. M. M., p. 30. 
lo^Ibid., Bk. L, N°. 10, p. 73. 
"» Co//"« Hist. Soc. of S. C, Vol. 3, p. 337. 
"J 5. C. Hist. 6- Gen. Mag., Vol. 11, p. 112. 
"2 Ibid., p. 116. 



62 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

undevised land to his eldest son Sir William Yeamans. Either 
by the latter or some subsequent holder it would appear to have 
been abandoned for on 6 Oct' 1681 a warrant was issued reciting 
that "upon consideracon had of the Petition of M'' Robert Gibbs 
the 2^ day of June, 1681 exhibited to the Governo' and Councill 
it was thereupon ordered that the s*^ M' Gibbs may be admitted 
to plant, settle, cultivate and possess that tract of land called 
Wappooe plantacon now deserted and lying vacant and unin- 
habitted" and directing the Surveyor General ''to cause to be 
admeasured unto the s'^ M'' Robert Gibbs the said tract of land 
called Wappoh plantacon. "^^^ An account of Robert Gibbes and 
the Gibbes family has been published in this magazine.'^* 

Under this warrant a grant was on 1"* March 1681/2 issued to 
"Robert Gibbs, Gentleman" for "a plantation conteyning two 
hundred and fourteen acres of land english measure now in the 
possession of the said Robert Gibbs seituate upon the West side 
of Ashley river. "^'^ 

On 16 July, 1703 another grant was made to Robert Gibbes 
for 400 (or 200) acres adjoining the grant for 214 acres. These two 
tracts aggregating 414 acres were by Robert Gibbes about 1710 
donated to his son William Gibbes who in 8 Aug. 1716 transferred 
them by way of marriage settlement (upon his marriage to Alice 
Culcheth) to Robert White, William Gibbon, and Thomas Brough- 
ton, all of whom on 22 June 1725 joined in a conveyance of the 414 
acres to "William Harvey of Charles Town Butcher. "^^^ 

On William Harveys death under his will the property passed 
to his sons Benjamin and Arnold Harvey who later conveyed to 
their brother John Harvey to whom his father had devised an 
adjoining 200 acres purchased from the estate of Benjamin God- 
frey so that John Harvey held the 414 acres formerly of Robert 
Gibbes and 200- acres formerly of Benjamin Godfrey. ^^'^ How 
long John Harvey held these lands the writer has not ascertained 
certainly as late as 1762 when he mortgaged them to his brother 
William Harvey but they passed to Edward Fenwicke sometime 

"3 Printed Warrant Bk., 1680-1692, p. 46-47. 
""Vol. 12, p. 78. 

"^0/. Hist. Com'' ofS. C, Bk. G, p. 161. 
'^^Proh. Ct. Bk. "Miscellanies," 1722-1726, p. 198. 
"■ M. C. 0. Charleston, Bk. Z. Z., p. .■.16. 



OLD CHARLES TOWN 63 

prior to March, 1780. The deed does not appear on record but 
the land had been in Fenwicke's ownership long enough prior to 
the siege of Charleston in 1780 for the point to be known as "Fen- 
wicke's Point" by which name it was known when the British on 
12*^ March 1780 constructed a battery on ''Fenwicke's Point. "ii» 

An account of this Edward Fenwicke and his descendants has 
been given in a former number of this Magazine. "^^ Fenwicke 
seems to have owned about 1007 acres including the 414 acres 
granted to Gibbes and 200 acres or more part of the Godfrey 
lands with considerable marsh land. 

In 1811, M" Martha Gadsden, a daughter of Edward Fenwicke, 
instituted proceedings in the Court of Common Pleas for a parti- 
tion of these lands among the heirs of Fenwicke and the 1007 
acres was laid out in a large number of subdivided tracts, over 20 
in number and sold out on 3'^ March, 1812 to different purchasers.^-" 

Several of the subdivisions were purchased by William Crafts, 
the eminent lawyer and orator of his day, and appear to have 
formed his country seat, which passed to his son the late George 
I. Crafts who possessed it for many years. The house was in a 
grove of live oaks on the side of the marsh of Ashley river just 
North of the public road leading to the bridge. 

The same Robert Gibbes had, shortly before obtaining this 
grant for 214 acres, obtained a grant on 5 October, 1681 for a 
•tract of 547 acres "upon Wappoe commonly called the Bluff bank 
or Cowpen plantation. "^-* The tract included in this grant lay 
South of Colleton Creek running thence South along Wappoo 
creek to a point beyond the "cut" from the head of Wappoo into 
Stono river. How and when this tract of 547 acres passed from 
Robert Gibbes or his heir the writer has not been able to find 
upon the record but the tract next appears in the ownership of 
John Lucas of the Island of Antigua who seemes to have owned 
it as early as May 1713.^-' John Lucas had quite extended landed 
interests in Carolina, viz., a plantation of 1500 acres on Combahee 
river, called Garden City, this Blufif plantation on Wappoo Creek 

"8 McCrady, Hist, of S. C. 1775-1780, p. 446. 
"'Vol. 14, p. 1. 

'20 M. C. O. Charleston, Bk.E,N°. 8, p. 155, and City Gazette and Commercial 
Advertiser for 3 March, 1812. 
'21 Grant Book, Vol. 38, p. 32. 
'22 Of. Hist. Com Bk. marked "Secretar>'s bonds," p. 90. 



64 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

estimated at 600 acres and 2950 acres on Waccamaw river all of 
which at his death seem to have passed to his son George Lucas 
afterwards the "Honorable Lieut. Col. George Lucas Lieut. 
Governor of the Island of Antigua "^^^ who in 1746 owned all 
these lands together with 86 slaves in Carolina. 

The historical interest of the plantation on Wappoo is that 
upon it, Col. Lucas' daughter, Miss Eliza Lucas, made the experi- 
ments in the cultivation of indigo which assisted largely in the 
development of its cultivation in the Province. Miss Lucas was 
not the first person in the Province by any means to attempt the 
cultivation of indigo but her crops planted under the supervision 
of a skilled cultivator showed how it could be grown to best results. 
It was on this plantation on Wappoo creek that Miss Lucas 
and her mother lived in Carolina and the account of her life upon 
it and of her labours in its cultivation are given in her letters to be 
found in her life written by her descendant the late M" St. Julien 
Ravenel published in 1896. 

The exact site of the house she lived in is difficult to place with 
certainty as it doubtless disappeared long ago but on the oldest 
map of the plantation found by the writer (viz., the plat annexed 
to the deed to John Drayton in 1770) there is a spot marked "old 
house" which is designated on the map accompanying this Article 
and which in all probability was the site of the Lucas dwelling. 
The fields around it were the scenes of her agricultural labours 
and experiments. 

Col. Lucas had upon his Wappoo plantation according to a 
mortgage from him to Charles Dunbar in 1738,^^^ 20 slaves — 12 
able bodied men and 8 able bodied women. It was whilst Miss 
Lucas was living in Carolina that the charming episode of her 
marriage took place to Charles Pinckney sometime Chief Justice 
of the Province. Col. Lucas desired to settle on his daughter 
as her dowry the Wappoo plantation and 20 "working slaves" 
subject to a mortgage debt of £350 — sterling^^^ but unfortunately 
he seems to have been too heavily embarrassed financially and the 
property all apparently went to his creditors, his daughter's 
contemplated dowry with the rest. Happily the merit of the 

'23 M. C. O. Charleston, Bks. S, p. 403 and C. C, p. 175. 

'24 M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. S, p. 403. 

•25 Prob. Ct. Charleston, Bk. 1746-1749, p. 198. 



OLD CHARLES TOWN 65 

lady was such as to render to her husband the addition of a dowry 
quite immaterial whilst she herself gave to her country in the 
services of her distinguished sons a donation beyond price. 

In 1746 Col. Lucas had mortgaged to Charles Alexander of the 
Island of Antigua all his lands in Carolina with his 86 slaves there 
and 20 slaves in Antigua.^-*' Under this mortgage the Wappoo 
plantation must have passed to the mortgage creditor for on 12 
Aprils 1770 Charles Alexander conveyed to John Drayton the 
plantation on Wappoo which "formerly belonged unto George 
Lucas deceased and is now Legally Vested in the said Charles 
Alexander. "^27 ^^ j-^g death of John Drayton his Executors 
under the directions of his Will to sell his plantation at Wappoo 
"formerly Col. Lucas' " sold to William Harvey one hundred 
and forty-eight acres of the Eastern part and the remainder of 
446 acres including the house site was on 6*'* November 1775 
sold to Thomas Rose and thereafter passed into the ownership of 
Edward Blake whose daughter Miss Mary (commonly designated 
as Polly) Blake, Thomas Rose had married, en second noces, and 
by whom he had one daughter, Mary Ann Blake Rose who married 
Capt. William Miles of St. Andrews Parish. 

Edward Blake had played quite a prominent part in the revolu- 
tionary war in South Carolina. He was first Commissioner of 
the Board of Naval Commissioners and as such had greatly the 
control of the Navy of South Carolina in the War.^^s ^t Blake's 
death the plantation i.e. the 446 acres was divided into two be- 
tween two of his children his son John Blake and daughter Sarah 
wife of the Rev^ D"" Henry Purcell but both tracts were subse- 
quently reunited in Edward Sebring who in November 1861 sold 
to John Thomsoni29 ^^q j^ 1888, conveyed to John N. Voorhees.i^" 

Northwest of "Old Town" plantation, or rather Northwest of 
the grant to William Branford of 150 acres in 1694 lay the plan- 
tation of the original Stephen Bull who came out in the very 
first ship and settled on the Ashley river. 

'=« M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. C. C, p. 178. 
'"Ibid., Bk. R, N°. 3, p. 243. 

'28 Printed Journal of Commissioners of the Navy of South Carolina, printed 
in 1912. 

'=9M. C. O. Charleston, Bk. I, N°. 14, p. 128. 
' oibid., Bk. A, N°. 32, p. 147. 



66 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

It was composed of 400 acres granted to Stephen Bull 28 Oct' 
1676^^^ (but which had evidently been taken up and settled by 
him prior to that date) and 100 acres adjoining granted in January 
1694/5.^^2 These lands passed to his son William Bull who added 
an adjoining tract of 580 acres granted to him 14 May 1707.^^^ 
From William Bull the plantation passed under his Will to his son 
the second William Bull. A full account of the Bull family and 
of the prominent positions held in and the services performed for 
the Province by the three first of the name will be found in a 
former number of this Magazine (Vol. 1, p. 76). From the last 
named William Bull the property passed under his will to his 
nephew William Bull and from him it passed to his son, William 
Stephen Bull, and from him to his son, the late William Izard Bull 
in whose possession it continued until after 1870. Then in conse- 
quence of the losses inflicted on him by the war of 1861-1865 the 
plantation was sold away having continued in the male line of the 
Bull family without a break from the first settlement of the Prov- 
ince for a period of 200 years. 

This Bull estate has been always known as "Ashly Hall." It 
is mentioned by that name in the Memorial of William Bull dated 
12 July 1763'-^^ and doubtless was so known at a much earlier date. 

Northwest of the Bull place or Ashley Hall and separated from 
it by a creek originally known by the Indian name of Weepoolaw 
or Wappalaw creek, was a tract of 510 acres originally granted 
to George Bedon (or Beadon) on 23 February, 1677, who on the 26 
December, 1683 conveyed it to George Hewes, whose Executor 
John Stevens on 16 May, 1694 conveyed it to Henry S)anonds or 
Symond.'^^^ Symonds died shortly after and his widow Frances 
Symonds on 8 June 1695 conveyed it to ''Benjamin Pierpont, 
Gentleman. "^^^ There is no grant on record to George Bedon but 
a new grant for the 510 acres was made to Benjamin Pierpont on 
the 14 October, 1696.1" 

A Benjamin Pierpont was a minister of the Congregational 

"1 Grant Bk., Vol. 38, p. 4. 

i32Ibid., p. 266. 

"3 O/. Hist. Com"., Bk. F, p. 44. 

^^^ Memorial Bk., N°. 6, p. 155. 

'5» Of. Hist. Comm", Bk. G, p. 436. 

"«Ibid., p. 439. 

'" Grants, Vol. 38, p. 309. 



OLD CHARLES TOWN 67 

Church in Charlestown who is stated to have come to the Province 
from New England in 1691. If he was the grantee of the 510 acres 
on the Ashley river then he enjoyed the property for a very brief 
time for it is said he died in 1698.^^^ Nevertheless his name 
survived as the name of the plantation which is still known as 
"Pierponts. " It is therefore probable that after his death the 
property continued in some descendant or member of his family 
of the same name as for many years in the boundaries of adjoining 
lands in old deeds and on old plats, the tract is described as 
"Pierponts" land. The writer has not ascertained on the record 
how and when the property passed from Benjamin Pierpont or 
his descendants but in 1789 it was owned by Thomas Fuller of 
St. Andrews Parish who by his will made in that year devised it 
to his son Christopher Fuller. At Christopher Fuller's death the 
property was in 1824 sold to Simon Magwood and thereafter 
contrary to the usual course of country property in lower Carolina, 
changed hands in quick successions. By Simon Magwood it was 
in 1827 given to his son James H. Magwood who in 1847 conveyed 
to Ralph Izard Middleton, the elder, from whom in 1850 it passed 
to D' T. L. Ogier, who in 1853 conveyed it to Joseph Prevost, 
who in 1855 conveyed to Charles Kerrison who about 188- con- 
veyed it to the late Robert N. Gourdin, Esq., of Charleston. 

The general map published with this article is all based on old 

plats of the properties. The division of the Godfrey property 

made by the third John Godfrey in 1721 being among the earliest. 

The map of the enclosed part of the Proprietors private plantation 

is a reduced copy of Culpepper's map of 1671. 

"8 S. C. Hist, b- Gen. Mag., Vol. 12, p. 26. 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 



1758-1788. 

Copied by Mabel L. Webber 

{Continued from the January Number) 

97 : Meredith Hughes of Prince Frederick, Bachelor, and Anne 
Ford of the Parish of Prince-George, Spinster, were married at the 
Plantation of George Ford in the Parish of Prince-George, by 
Licence, this Ninth Day of January, in the year of our Lord, 
1772, by me, S. F. Warren, Rector of St. James Santee. 
This Marriage was 1 Meredith Hughes 

Solemniz'd between us j Ann Ford 

In the Presence of Peter Bonneau 

Tho« Poten. 

98: James McPherson of the Parish of Prince Frederick, 
Bachelor, and Lydia Jean Glen of the Parish of Prince Frederick, 
Spinster, were married at the Plantation of Doctor James Crokatt 
in the Parish of Prince Frederick, by Licence, this Tenth Day of 
January, in the year of our Lord 1772, by me S. F. Warren, Rector 
of St. James Santee. 

This marriage was \ James McPherson 

Solemnized between us/ Lydia Jane Glen 

In the Presence of Elias McPherson 

John Futhey. 

99: Thomas Hasell of the Parish of Prince George, Bachelor, 
and Margaret Summers of the Parish of Prince George Spinster, 
were married at the dwelling-house of Miss Judith Trapier, of 
the Parish of Prince George, Spinster, by Licence this Second 
Day of February, in the Year of our Lord 1772, by me S. F. 
Warren, Rector of St. James Santee. 
This marriage was 1 Thomas Hasell 

Solemnized between us J M. Summers 

In the Presence of Jos. Dubourdieu 

P. Trapier Jr. 
68 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES ', SANTEE 69 

100: Henry Bochet of this Parish, and Judith Boineau of this 
Parish Spinster, were married at the Dwelling-house of Michael 
Boineau of this Parish, Sen"", by Licence, this Fourteenth Day of 
May in the Year of our Lord 1772, by me, S. F. Warren, Rector of 
this Parish. 

This marriage was 1 Henry Bochet 

Solemnized between us J Judith Boineau 

In the Presence of Jonah Robert 

James Ware 

101: John Woodbery of the Parish of [break] Charlestown, 
Bachelor & Sarah Anderson of this Parish, Spinster, were married 
at the Plantation of Jonah Collins of this Parish, by Licence, this 
Twenty-first Day of May, in the year of our Lord, 1772, by me 
S. F. Warren, Rector of this Parish. 
This marriage was 1 John Woodbery 

Solemnized between us J Sarah Anderson 

In the Presence of Jon. Horry 

James Bell 

102; John Perdriau of the Parish of St. Stephen, Bachelor, 
and Anne Dupont of the Parish of Prince-Frederick, Spinster, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of Anne LeNud, of the Parish 
of Prince-Frederick, Widow, by Licence this Second Day of June, 
in the Year of our Lord 1772, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of St. 
James Santee. 

This marriage was 1 Jn. Perdriau 

Solemnized between usj Ann Dupont 

In the Presence of Jonah Robert 

A. Caleb Guerry 

103: John White of the Parish of St. Thomas, Bachelor, and 
Isabella Chappell of this Parish, Spinster, were married in the 
Dwelling-house of the Reverend Samuel Fenner Warren of this 
Parish, by Licence this Eight Day of June in the year of our Lord 
1772 by me S. F. Warren, Rector of St. James Santee. 
This marriage was O J- W. his mark 

Solemnized between usJ Isabella Chappel 

In the Presence of Anna Gaillard 

James Allen Bruneau 



70 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

104: Richard Blake Junior, of this Parish Widower, and Anne 
Bearman of this Parish, Widow, were married in the Dwelling- 
house of James Bell of this Parish, by Licence, this Twenty third 
day of July, in the year of our Lord, 1772, by me S. F. Warren, 
Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was 1 Richard Blake Junior 

Solemnized between usj Anne Bearman X her mark 

In the Presence of James Bell 

John Blake 

105: Nathaniel Arthur of the Parish of Christ Church, Bache- 
lor, and Mary Simmons of this Parish, Spinster, were married at 
the Plantation of George Simmons of this Parish, by Licence, 
this Third Day of December, in the Year of our Lord, 1772, by me 
S. F. Warren, Rector of this Parish. 
This marriage was 1 Nathaniel Arthur 

Solemnized between usj Mary Simmons 

In the Presence of George Arthur 

Mary Simmons 

106: John Steel of this Parish, Bachelor and Dorothy Chicken, 
of this Parish, Spinster, were married at the Plantation of William 
Chicken of this Parish, by Licence, this Thirtieth Day of March, 
in the Year of our Lord 1773, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of this 
Parish. 

This marriage was 1 John Steel 

Solemnized between usj Dorothy Chicken 

In the Presence of Jonah Robert 

Lewis Miles 

107: Isaac Rembert of the Parish of Prince-George, Junior, 
Bachelor, and Margaret Jeanneret of this Parish, Spinster, were 
married at the Dwelling-house of Captain Jacob Jeanneret, of 
this Parish, by Licence, this Thirteenth Day of May, in the year 
of our Lord, 1773, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of this Parish. 
This marriage was 1 Isaac Pembert Jun'. 

Solemnized between usj Margaret Jeannerett 

In the Presence of W"*. Thomas 

Joseph Logan 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 71 

108: John Jaudon of the Parish of Prince-Frederick, Widower, 
and Anne Steel of the Parish of Prince-Frederick Spinster, were 
married at the Plantation of Thomas Lynch Esq., of this Parish, 
by Licence, this Fourth Day of July in the year of our Lord, 1773, 
by me S. F. Warren, Rector of this Parish. 
This marriage was 1 John Jaudon 

Solemnized between usj Ann Steel 

In the Presence of Benj". Perdriau 

W". Steel 

109: Peter Steel of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Bachelor, 
and Anne Varnor of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Spinster 
were married at the Plantation of the Rev'd Samuel Fenner 
Warren of this Parish, by Licence, this Fifteenth Day of August, 
in the Year of our Lord, 1773, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of this 
Parish. 

This marriage was 1 P. Steel 

Solemnized between usj Ann Varnor 

In the Presence of James Sinkler 

John Jaudon 

110: David Gaillard of the Parish of St. Stephens, Bachelor, 
and Joanna Dubose of the Parish of St. Stephens, Spinster, were 
married at the Plantation of Theodore Gaillard Sen' of this 
Parish, by Licence, this Twenty-Third Day of September in the 
Year of our Lord 1773. 

This marriage was 1 David Gaillard 

Solemnized between usj Joanna Dubose 

In the Presence of James Rivers 

Isaac Dubose 

111: William Barton of the Parish of Prince- Frederick Bachelor, 
and Jane Thomson of the Parish of Prince Frederick Spinster, 
were married at the Plantation of Captain Anthony White of the 
Parish of Prince-Frederick, by Licence, this Twenty-fourth Day 
of September in the Year of our Lord 1773, by me S. F. Warren 
Rector of St. James Santee. 
This marriage was 1 William Barton 

Solemnized between usj Jane Thomson 

In the Presence of Catherine Mclver 

Antho^. White 



72 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

112: James Farmer of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Bachelor, 
and Rebekah Ellis of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Spinster, 
were married at this Chapel, by Banns, this Twenty-seventh Day 
of January in the year of our Lord 1774, by me, S. F. Warren, 
Rector of this Parish. 

This marriage was \ James Farmer 

Solemnized between us J Rebekah Ellis X her mark 

In the Presence of Tho^. Jones 

Benj''. Perdriau 

113: Benjamin Webb of this Parish, Bachelor and Sarah 
Hannah Webb of this Parish Spinster, were married at the Dwell- 
ing-house of Mrs. Elizabeth Gaillard Wid^ of this Parish, by 
Licence, this Fifteenth Day of February, in the year of our Lord, 
1774, by me S. F. Warren, Rector of this Parish. 
This marriage was \ Benjamin Webb 

Solemnized between us j Sarah Hannah Webb 

In the Presence of Elizabeth Webb 

Elizabeth Gaillard 

114: Benjamin Stone of this Parish, Bachelor, and Elizabeth 
Knight of this Parish, Spinster, were married at the Dwelling- 
house of the Rev'd Sam'l Fenner Warren, of this Parish, by Licence, 
this Sixth Day of March, in the Year of our Lord, 1774, by me 
S. F. Warren, Rector of this Parish. 
This marriage was 1 Benjamin Stone 

Solemnized between us J Elizabeth Knight 

In the Presence of John Raines [?] 

Benj*. Perdriau 

115: Jonah Roberts of this Parish, Bachelor, and Mary Guerry 
of this Parish, Widow, were married in the Dwelling-house of 
Mary Guerry, of this Parish, Widow, by Licence, this Third Day of 
May in the Year of our Lord, 1774,^ by me S. F. Warren, Rector 
of this Parish. 

'The Rev. S. F. Warren returned to England in August, 1774, on a visit 
to his relations. He was offered a living in Kent, with a promise of promotion, 
by the Archbishop of Canterbury, but had become warmly attached to America, 
so declined these offers. He went to France, from there to Martinique, and 
returned to Charles Town in May, 1778. (Dalcho, page 301.) 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 73 

This marriage was \ Jonah Roberts 

Solemnized between us J Mary Guerry 

In the Presence of Henry Bochet 

Ann Sanders 

116: Jacob Micheau of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Bachelor, 
and Esther Cromwell, Spinster, of the Parish of Prince Frederick, 
were married in the dwelling house of Oliver Cromwell of the 
Parish of Prince Frederick, Planter, by Licence, this Eleventh 
day of June, in the Year of our Lord, 1778, by me, S. F. Warren, 
of the Parish of St. James' Santee, CI"". 
This marriage was \ Jacob Micheau 

Solemnized between us j Esther Cromwell 

In the Presence of Manasseh Micheau 

Jacob Jeanerette 

117: John Barton of this Parish, Bachelor and Elizabeth 
Pearcey of this Parish, Spinster, were married at the Plantation 
of Benjamin Webb of this Parish Planter, by Licence this Ninth 
Day of July, in the Year of our Lord, 1778, by me, S. F. Warren, of 
this Parish Clerk. 

This marriage was \ John Barton X his mark 

Solemnized between us j Elizabeth Pacy [Sic] 

In the Presence of Benjamin Webb 

Sarah Hannah Webb 

118: Samuel Hasford of the Parish of All Saints, Widower, 
and Mary Pawley of the Parish of Allsaints, Spinster, were married 
at the Plantation of Percivill Pawley of the Parish of Allsaints by 
Licence this Ninteenth day of July in the year of our Lord, 1778, 
by me, S. F. Warren, of the Parish of St. James' Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 Samuel Hasford. 

Solemnized between us j Mary Pawley 

In the Presence of Frances Michau 

Elizabeth Pawley 

1 19: George Denholm of the Parish of Prince-George, Bachelor, 
and Ann Hill of the Parish of Prince George, Widow, were mar- 
ried in the Dwelling house of Mrs. Anne Hill of the Parish of 



74 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Prince George by Licence, this Twenty third day of July, in the 
year of our Lord, 1778, by me, S. F. Warren, of the Parish of St. 
James' Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was \ George Denholm 

Solemnized between us j Ann Hill 

In the Presence of William Luptan 

W. Vaux 

120: Peter Guerry of the Parish of St. Stephens, Widower, 
and Judith Croft of the Parish of Prince-Frederick, Widow, were 
married in the Dwelling house of Isaac Pembert, Sen', of the 
Parish of Prince Frederick Planter, by Licence, this Thirtieth 
day of July, in the year of our Lord, 1778, by me S. F, Warren, 
of the Parish of St. James' Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was \ Peter Guerry 

Solemnized between us / Judith Croft 

In the Presence of Manasseh Michau 

C. Wm. Lenud 

121 : Thomas Mitchell of the Parish of Prince George, Bachelor, 
and Anne Rothmahler of the Parish of Prince-George, Spinster, 
were married at the Dwelling-house of Job Rothmahler, Esq. 
of the Parish of Prince George, by Licence, This Thirteenth Day 
of August, in the Year of our Lord, 1778, by me S. F. Warren, of 
the Parish of St. James' Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was \ Tho^. Mitchell 

Solemnized between us J Ann Rothmahler 

In the Presence of Edward Mitchell 

Jos. Wragg 

122: John Wells of this Parish Bachelor, and Elizabeth Mou- 
zon of this Parish, Spinster, were married at the Dwelling house 
of Susanna Elizabeth Mouzon of this Parish, by Licence this 
Sixteenth day of August in the year of our Lord, 1778 by me, S. 
F. Warren, of this Parish, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 Jn^. Wells 

Solemnized between us j Elizabeth Mouzon 

In the Presence of Samuel Warren 

Lewis Mouzon 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 75 

123: William Leigh of the Parish of Prince-Frederick, Bachelor, 
and Esther Bernard of the Parish of Prince-Frederick, Widow, 
were married at the Dwelling house of Esther Bernard Widow, 
of Prince Frederick, by Licence, this Twenty Seventh day of 
August, in the year of our Lord, 1778, by me, S. F. Warren of the 
Parish of St. James' Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 W™. Leigh 

Solemnized between us J Esther Bernard 

In the Presence of George Mcdowell 

Peter Lenud 

124: Edward Martin of the Parish of Prince George, Widower 
and Elizabeth Trapier of the Parish of Prince George Spinster, 
were married at the Dwelling house of Paul Trapier, Esq. of the 
Parish of Prince-George by Licence, this Seventeenth day of 
September, in the year of our Lord, 1778, by me, S. F. Warren, 
of the Parish of St. James' Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 Edward Martin 

Solemnized between us j Eliza Trapier 

In the Presence of John Waties Ju°. 

Jos. Wragg 

125: George Ford of the Parish of Prince George, Widower 
and Mary Boone of this Parish, Spinster, were married at the 
Dwelling house of Mr. Capers Boone of this Parish, by Licence 
this Thirteenth Day of October in the year of our Lord, 1778, 
by me S. F. Warren, of this Parish, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 Geo. Ford 

Solemnized between usj Mary Boone 

In the Presence of William Boone 

John Shackelford Jun. 

126: Nathan Parks of the Parish of Prince-George, Bachelor 
and Anne Waller of the Parish of Prince George, Spinster, were 
married in the Dwelling-house of the Rev'd Samuel Fenner Warren 
of this Parish, by Licence, this Eight Day of November in the 
year of our Lord, 1778, by me S. F. Warren of this Parish Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 Nathan Parks 

Solemnized between usj Ann Waller 

In the Presence of Simon Fortines 

Samuel Warren 



76 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

127: Joseph Wigfall of the Parish of Christ Church, Widower, 
and Sarah Shackelford of the Parish of Prince George, Widow, were 
married in the Dwelling-house of Mrs. Sarah Shackelford of the 
Parish of Prince George, by Licence, this Seventh day of January, 
in the year of our Lord 1779, by me S. F. Warren, of the Parish of 
St. James Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Joseph Wigfall 

Solemnized between us J Sarah Shackelford 

In the Presence of Jno. Cogdell 

James Withers 

128: John Coombs of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Bachelor, 
and Anne Shields of this Parish, Widow, were married in the 
DweUing-house of the Rev'd S. F. Warren of this Parish, by Banns, 
this First day of February, in the year of our Lord, 1779, by me 
S. F. Warren,, of this Parish, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 John Coombs X his mark 

Solemnized between us J Anne Shields X her mark 

In the Presence of Daniel Jaudon 

Constant June 

129: John Hays of the Parish of Prince George Bachelor, and 
Penelope Bernard of the Parish of Prince George Spinster, were 
married at the Dwelling-house of S. F. Warren of this Parish, 
Clerk, by Banns, this Eight Day of March, in the year of our 
Lord, 1779, by me S. F. Warren, Clerk, of this Parish. 
This marriage was 1 John Hays 

Solemnized between us J Penelope Bernard X her mark 

In the Presence of Thomas Hoddey X his mark 

Lydia Perdriau 

130: James Leger of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Bachelor, 
and Kesia Stewart of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Spinster, 
were married at the Dwelling-house of the Rev'd S. F. Warren, of 
this Parish, Clerk, by Banns, this Twenty fifth Day of March, 
in the year of our Lord, 1779, by me, S. F. Warren, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 James Leger 



Solemnized between us J Kesia Stewart X her mark 

In the Presence of W™. Leger X his mark 

Daniel Dupre 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 77 

131: John Hext of the Parish of St. Bartholomew, Bachelor, 
and Elizabeth Cheesborough of the Parish of Prince George, Spinster, 
were married at the Dwelling-house of Mrs. Mann of the Parish 
of Prince-George by Licence this Twentieth Day of April in the 
year of our Lord, 1779, by me, S. F. Warren of the Parish of St. 
James' Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 John Hext 

Solemnized between us/ Eliza Cheesborough 

In the Presence of John Gough 

John Cheesborough 

132 : Edward Coloney of the Parish of Prince George, Bachelor, 
and Hannah Charners of the Parish of Prince George, Spinster, 
were married at the Dwelling-house of Daniel Willcox of the Parish 
of Prince George, by Licence, this Twenty first day of April, in 
the year of our Lord, 1779, by me, S. F. Warren of the Parish of 
St. James', Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Edward Canoly [sic] 

Solemnized between us J Hannah Charners X her mark 

In the Presence of Jn". Wilson 

James Campbell 

133: William Alexander Hyrne of the Parish of Prince-George, 
Bachelor, & Sarah Mitchell of the Parish of Prince George, Spinster 
were married at the Dwelling-house of Mr. Benjamin Young of 
the Parish of Prince George, by Licence, this Third day of June 
in the year of our Lord 1779, by me S. F. Warren of the Parish 
of St. James' Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 W™. Alex. Hyrne 

Solemnized between us J Sarah Mitchell 

In the Presence of Benj°. Young 

Anth F. Mitchell 

134: Stephen Ford of the Parish of Prince-Frederick Widower, 
and Margaret White, of the Parish of Prince George, Spinster, 
were married at the Dwelling-house of Mr. Anthony Martin 
White of the Parish of Prince George, by Licence, this Eight day 
of July, in the year of our Lord, 1779, by me, S. F. Warren, of the 
Parish of St. James, Santee, Clerk. 



78 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

This marriage was 1 Stephen Ford, Jun'. 

Solemnized between us J Margaret White 

In the Presence of Geo. Ford 

WiUiam Barton 

135: Joseph Keen of the Parish of Prince-George, Bachelor, 
and Anne Crook of the Parish of Prince-George, Spinster, were 
married in the Dwelling-house of Mrs. Eliz: Crook, of the Parish 
of Prince-George, Widow, by Licence, this Twenty-ninth Day of 
July, in the year of our Lord, 1779, by me S. F. Warren, of the 
Parish of St. James' Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 Joseph Keen 

Solemnized between us J Ann Crook 

In the Presence of Godard Delworth [?] 

John Robinson 

136: WilHam Rains of the Parish of All Saints Bachelor, and 
Phebe Rishea of the Parish of Prince George, Spinster, were married 
in the DweUing-house of the Rev'*^ Samuel Fenner Warren of this 
Parish, by Banns, this Eighteenth day of Nov'"", in the year of 
our Lord, 1779, by me S. F. Warren, of this Parish, Clerk. 
This marriage was \ William Rain 

Solemnized between us / Phebe Rishea X her mark 

In the Presence of Peter DesChampes 

Caleb Lepear 

137: Stephen Guerry of the Parish of St. Stephens — Bachelor 
and Frances Micheau of the Parish of Allsaints, Spinster, were 
married at the DwelHng-house of Mr. John Guerry of the Parish 
of St. Stephens, by Licence, this Third day of December in the 
year of our Lord, 1779, by me S. F. Warren, of St. James' Santee, 
Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Steph''. Guerry 

Solemnized between us J Frances Michau 

In the Presence of H. Lenud 

Benj. Guerry 

138: Joseph Labruce of the Parish of Allsaints, Bachelor and 
Hannah Allston of the Parish of Allsaints — Spinster, were married 
at the Dwelling house of Mr. WilHam Allston of the Parish of All- 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 79 

saints by Licence, this Third day of February in the year of our 

Lord, 1780, by me, S. F. Warren of the parish of St. James Santee, 

Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Joseph LaBruce 

Solemnized between us J Hannah AUston 

In the Presence of Fran^. Allston 

W". Allston Jun^ 

139: Robert Dealey of the Parish of St. Stephen, Bachelor, 
and Hester Bailey of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Widow, 
were married at the Dwelling-house of M''. Isaac Rembert, of the 
Parish of Prince-Frederick, by Licence, this Twenty-second Day 
of February in the year of our Lord, 1780, by me, S. F. Warren 
of the Parish of St. James' Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 Robert Dealey 

Solemnized between us J Esther Bailey 

In the Presence of Peter Guerry 

Martha Rembert 

140: James Landels of this Parish, Bachelor, and Damaris 
Murrall of this Parish, Spinster, were married in the Dwelling 
house of Cap't. Richard Withers of this Parish, by Licence, this 
Twenty third Day of February, in the year of our Lord, 1780, 
by me, S. F. Warren of this Parish, Clerk. 
This marriage was \ James Landels 

Solemnized between us / Damaris Murrell 

In the Presence of Benjamin Webb 

Sarah Piercey 

141 ; Thomas Hamlin of the Parish of Christ Church, Widower, 
and Margaret Jaudon of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Widow, 
were married at this Chapel, by Banns, this Twenty third day of 
August, in the year of our Lord, 1780, by me S. F. Warren, of this 
Parish, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Tho^. HamHn 

Solemnized between us J Marg". Jaudon 

In the Presence of Alex. Chovin 

Geo. Mcdowell 

{To be continued) 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKfi. 

(August 1778 to May 1780.) 
{Continued from the January Number.) 



June, 1779 

Parole, Gordon, C 

Brig'. GenJ. ] 

Colonel 

Major 

B:M. J 



S. Gates, Green. 



for tomorrow 



Thirteen Mile House. 



fGen'. Sumner 
I L*. Col°. Tinnin 
I Major Wise 
Cap". Raiford 



A fatigue party of One Sub: One Serj* & 25 Rank & File from 
each Brigade, to be paraded immediately — The waggon with the 
Intrenching Tools to move with the part. — 

The loaded Arms are to be discharged immediately, not a Gun 
to be fired after 8 o'clock. 

For Command immediately — One Cap*, two Sub". 3 Serj*^. & 
50 Rank & file — The Cap*, will attend for Orders at Head-Quarters 
as soon as the detachment is paraded. 

2d: Camp at the Cross roads, near M''. Somer's Plantation. 

Parole Harrington. C. S. Hampden, Hume. 

Brig^ Gen'. ] fGen». Butler 

Colonel I ^ j L*. Col°. Baker 

- , . >- for tomorrow < , ^ . -r^ ^ 

Major I I Major Eaton 

B:M. J [Cap*. Lowry 

For Camp Piquet to Night, Lt. Col". Lytle, Major Owens. 

The Drums are to beat in Camp as usual. 

A fatigue party of 1 Sub. 1 Serg*. & 25 Rank & File from each 
Brigade to be paraded immediately, near Head Quarters with one 
Days provisions cooked. 

A Field return of the whole Army is to be immediately made 
to the A. G: 

The fatigue party ordered today, not having marched are to be 
paraded at 5 oclock at Head Quarters & to receive their In- 
structions from the Engineer. 

Camp at the Cross roads, near M'. Somer's Plantation. 

80 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAND GRIMKE 81 

3d: (June 1779.) 

Parole, Ireton. C: S. Ingrin, Innis 

Brig'. Gen'. ] fGen'. Williamson 

Colonel I r . J Col''. Armstrong 

,, . > for tomorrow S nr • t>' ^ 

Major I Major Pinckney 

B:M. J [Cap". Bowie 

For Camp Piquet to Night. 

In future the Guards will mount at Troop beating except when 
the Army marches. 

Colonel Malmody's Light Troops will be immediately reinforced 
by One hundred Rifle Men from Gen'. Williamson's Brigade, 
with a suitable number of Officers, & Sixty Light Horse from 
Colonel Hammond's Corps. 

One other Corps of Light Troops will be formed from the 
South Carolina & N: Carolina Brigades of Cont'. Troops, Gen'. 
Butler's Brigade & Col°. Mason's Militia from Virginia, to consist 
of three hundred Men & a suitable number of Ofl&cers, & to be 
joined by One hundred Light Horse from Col°. Hammond's Corps. 

The Gen'. Court Martial of which Major Armstrong is president, 
have reported,— John Alexander of the 3''. S**. Carolina reg*. 
charged with Desertion, & being taken in Arms with the Enemy — 
found guilty & sentenced to be hanged by the neck till he be 
dead. The Gen', approves the Sentence. 

James Ogerton of the 3^ S°. Carolina reg*. charged with De- 
sertion, & being found in Arms with the Enemy — found guilty 
& sentenced to receive 100 Lashes on his bare back with Switches — 
The Gen', approves the Sentence & orders it to be executed to- 
morrow Morning at Guard-Mounting. 

Colonel Armstrong of the 5*^. N. Carolina reg*. is appointed 
to the Command of the N. Carolina Brigade, till further Orders. 

The S°. Carolina Brigade under Command of L*. Col°. Mayson, 
& the Virginia Brigade under Command of Col°. Mason, will 
compose one Division under Brig"". Gen'. Huger & form the right 
Wing of the first Line. 

The N. Carolina Brigade commanded by Col°. Armstrong & 
the N. Carolina Militia Commanded by Gen'. Butler, will compose 
one Division under Brig"". Gen'. Sumner, & form the left Wing of 
the first Line— This Arrangement will continue till further Orders. 



82 



so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 



Cap" Hubbard of the Virginia Troops, is appointed Brigade 
Major thereof & is to be obeyed & respected accordingly. 



4th: Parole C. S 

Brig'. Gen' 
Colonel 
Major 
B:M. 



» for tomorrow '< 



Col°. Armstrong 
L*. Col°. McDowell 
Major Richardson 
Cap*. Raiford 



The Army is to be in readiness at four o'clock this afternoon. 

A Return of the Field Of&cers with the Dates of their Com- 
missions, is to be made this Afternoon. 

Lieu*. Col°. Henderson & Major Pinckney of the So. Carolina 
Cont^ Brigade, are appointed Field Officers to the Second Battalion 
of Light Infantry. 

Gen'. Count Pulaskie will take the Command of the Light 
Troops of the Army both Cavalry & Infantry. 

All Detachments returning to Camp, will report immediately 
to Head Quarters. 

Cap". Lining of the first S°. Carolina regiment is appointed 
Major of Brigade to the S°. Carolina Cont'. Brigade & is to be 
obeyed & respected accordingly. 

5th: Head Quarters, Cap". Somer's House. 

M: O: A fatigue Party of One hundred men to be paraded 
immediately — They are to be supplied with all the Axes which 
can be collected in the different Regiments. 

Parole, Loring — C: S. Lark, Lance. 

Brig"-. Gen'. 



Colonel 
Major 
B. M. 



>. for tomorrow < 



Gen'. Butler 
Col°. Tinnin 
Major Wise 
Cap" Lowry 



Commanding Officers of Regiments or Corps, having it more in 
their power to judge of the indispensable Necessity which may call 
Officers from Camp at this critical Season, than the General 
possibly can. — All Officers who are desirous to obtain Leave of 
Absence must make Application to them, who will grant or refuse 
the request as the Situation of the regiments or Corps may require, 
or allow. 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAND GRIMKE 83 

6th: June, 1779. Head Quarters, Stono. 

Parole C: S. 

Brig''. Gen*. '] fGen^ Williamson 

Colonel |- for tomorrow < L*. Col°. Burwell 

B:M. J [ Cap". Bowie 

Whenever a Soldier is sent to the Hospital, the Commanding 
Officer of the Troop or Company to which he belongs, will order 
one of his Serjeants to deliver Arms & Accouterments of the Sick 
Man, to the regimental Quarter Master, who will give a receipt 
& be accountable for them. 

Divine Service will be performed at 5 oclock this Evening, 
Col°. Johnston's regiment will be paraded immediately for Com- 
mand. 

7th: Parole C: S. 

Brig'. Gen*. ] fCol". Armstrong 

F : O. 1- for tomorrow \ L*. Col°. Purves 

B:M. J [Cap°. Herbert 

John Alexander now under Sentence of Death, is ordered to be 
executed tomorrow Morning at Eleven o'Clock. 

The Brigadier of the day will give the necessary Instructions. 

The Troop will beat in future at six o'Clock in the Morning, 
& 'tis expected the Guards will be on the Grand parade in half an 
hour after — The utmost punctuallity will be necessary to avoid the 
inconvenient Heat of the Sun — The Officers will bring their Names, 
Ranks, regiments & Dates of Commissions in writing, which will 
be delivered on the parade to the Brigade Major of the Day who 
will make a Return of them to the Adj*. Gen*, as soon as the Guards 
are marched off, specifying the particular guard to which each 
Officer is appointed. 

The Army is to be supplied with a Gill of Rum ^ Man at three 
oClock this Afternoon. 

All Horses taken from the Enemy in future are, as by the Order 
of May 17**^ last, to be delivered to the Q: M: G. appraised, & 
their Marks natural & artificial taken, & sent to the several Prin- 
ters in Charlestown, requesting a publication of them, and that 
Notice be given to the public that in forty Days the Value of them 
will be divided among the Captors, unless before the Expiration 



84 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

of that Term it be made to appear that they have been plundered 
from some of the Inhabitants of these States. A Certificate will 
be given to the Commanding Officer capturing them, by the 
Q: M: G. that they have been received by him, & at what they 
have been appraised. 

8th: Parol. C. S; 

Brigadier Col, Mayson] 

F: O. Major Wise |> for tomorrow 

B. M. Cap''. Lining J 

The Army is to be paraded at Eleven oClock to day. 
[Here is inserted the resolution of Congress, 17*'* Sept'. 1778, 
concerning the pay of prisoners, deserters and men who have died 
in service: See Journals of the Continental Congress, Vol. xii, 1778, 
page 924.] 

For Command tomorrow Morning at four oClock, from Colonel 
Mason's [sic] Brigade, One Subaltern, One Serjeant, One Corporal 
& twenty-five privates. 

9th: June 1779. Head Quarters Stono. 

Parole C:S. 

Brigadier for tomorrow Gen^ Butler. 

F: O. Major Eaton 

B:M. Cap*. Raiford 
As the Dews in this Climate are very prejudicial to the Health 
of the Men, the Gen^ directs that Bush Huts be built by those 
Troops who have not Tents as soon as possible after they come upon 
the Ground, & that the Men be not suffered to bathe in stagnated 
Water, or when overheated, & that they avoid when in that 
Situation Lying on the wet or cold Ground; &he begs to recom- 
mend it to the Army at this hot Season, to avoid the Damp of 
the Evening as much as maybe. 

The honble the Cont'. Congress have been pleased to come to 
the following Resolution — S*'' Febr^, 1779. 

Resolved that the Cap*, or Commanding Officer of each Company 
in the Service of the United States, shall at the End of every Month 
furnish the regimental Pay-Masters with a Pay Roll containing 
the Names of the Commissioned & Non Commissioned Oflficers 
& privates of the Company, their ranks the time from & to which 
they are paid, thus Monthly pay the Sums due to each, & a Column 



>■ for tomorrow 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAND GRIMKE 85 

for Casualties, in which is to be inserted the Dates of Deaths, 
Desertions, Discharges & Captivities, & the Several regimental 
pay Masters shall respectively keep true Copies of such pay Rolls 
and cause the Amount thereof to be added to the proper Abstracts 
of the Field, & Staff, & Staff Officers, That the whole may be ex- 
amined as heretofore ordered by Congress. 

10th: June 1779. Head Quarters Stono. 

Parole Quixotte. C: S. Quinsey, Quin. 
Brigadier, Gen'. Williamson 
F. O. Major Armstrong (of Gen'. 

Butlers) 
B : M. Cap". Lowry 
All ofl&cers in this District who have received publick Money 
(as yet unaccounted for) are desired to repair to the Auditor's 
Quarters & settle their Accounts in a Month, such as neglect or 
refuse to comply with this Order, will be reported to the Com- 
manding Ofl&cer of the Troops agreable to the resolves of Congress 
of the 6*^ Febry 1778. 
In Congress 11**^ Febry 1779. 

Resolved that the Account of the regimental Pay Masters be 
settled at least once a Quarter, & rendered agreable to such forms 
as shall be agreable to the Board of Treasury. 

Treasury Office lO*''. Febr^ 1779. 
Order 'd that the Regimental pay Masters be required on the 
Settlement of their Accounts to produce Vouchers agreable to the 
Acts of Congress, which are on no account to be dispensed with. 

For Command this Afternoon from Gen'. Butler's Brigade, 
One Serjeant, one Corporal & 12 privates, — they are to conduct 
Benjamin Barker, Richard Finly, W™. Welch, & John Stanbury, 
with 6 Negroes now (confined in the Main Guard) to Charles Tow^n. 

11th: Parole, Richmond, C: S. Richard, Rigby 
Brigadier, Col°. Armstrong 1 

F: O. Major Harris ?■ for tomorrow 

B:M. Cap^ Bowie J 

The Officers of the Main Guard is to detain no Prisoners (except 

prisoners of War.) in Confinement, unless his crime in Writing 

is given in, the Regiment to which he belongs, & the Evidences 

who are to convict him on his Tryal. 

(To be continued.) 



DEATH NOTICES FROM THE SOUTH CAROLINA AND 
AMERICAN GENERAL GAZETTE, AND ITS CON- 
TINUATION THE ROYAL GAZETTE. 

May 1766- June 1782. 

Compiled by Mabel L. Webber. 

{Continued from the January Number.) 

On Monday last, the 18th instant, died the right honourable 
Lady Anne Murray, wife of John Murray, Esq; M.D. and daugh- 
ter of the right hon. George, earl of Cromartie, deceased. Her 
ladyship was first married to the honourable Edmond Atkins, 
Esq; Superintendent of Indian affairs in the Southern district of 
America, and president of his majesty's council in this province, 
who died in 1761. "With all the politeness, ease and dignity of 
her rank and birth, she possessed a chearfullness of mind and 
temper, with a sweetness of behavior that commanded the esteem 
and love of all. In the more adverse scenes of life, her fortitude 
and equanimity never forsook her; and her last long and painful 
illness; she bore with that patience and resignation, and met death 
with that confidence, which nothing but true religion can inspire; 
leaving a disconsolate husband and relations, with all who had the 
pleasure of her acquaintanc to regret her loss." 

On Wednesday last died, Mr. WilHam Guerin, of this town, 
merchant. 

About a fortnight ago died in Christ Church parish Mr. Thomas 
Bennett, a native of this province, aged 81, having lived upwards of 
60 years in the said parish, where he has left a brother several 
years older than himself. (Friday, January 22, 1768.) 

Capt. Siddal, the Master, and Surgeon of the Greenville Packet 
Boat, all died at sea in their passage from Jamaica to Pansacola. 
(Friday, February 26, 1768). 

Extract of a letter from Pinetreehill in this Province, dated 
February 20lh, 1708. 

''On Saturday last the 13th instant, died here in the 46th year 
of his age, Samuel Wyly, Esq.; a native of Ireland, and one of the 

86 



DEATH NOTICES SO. CA. AND AM. GEN. GAZETTE 87 

principal of the people called Quakers. A Gentleman well known 
in this Province, and universally esteemed for his Probity, Hos- 
pitality, Urbanity, and for every Social Virtue. The Tribe of 
Catabau Indians in this neighborhood paid him the utmost defer- 
ence, revering him as their friend and Guardian. (Friday, March 
4, 1768.) 

On Friday last died the Honourable Charles Shinner, Esq; a 
Member of his Majesty's Council, and Chief Justice of this Prov- 
ince. (Friday, March 4, 1768.) 

On Sunday last died here Mr. Alexander Petrie, Silver-Smith, 
who had acquired a handsome Fortune, with a fair Character, and 
had some Time ago retired from Business. (Friday, March 11, 
1768.) 

On Tuesday evening last, as Captain Richard Davies, of the Ship 
Hope, was going on Board the said Vessel, lying at one of wharfs, 
he unfortunately fell from off the stage into the River and was 
drowned. It is thought a Rope, which was across the stage, and 
which the Darkness prevented him from feeling, tripped him up 
and was the cause of this melancholy accident. (Friday, March 
18, 1768.) 

Died.] William Middleton, Esq; one of the members for the 
parish of St. Helena in the present Assembly, and the only Son of 
the deceased Colonel Thomas Middleton. (Friday, April 8, 1 768.) 

Died.] Mrs. Sarah Stoutinburgh, in an advanced Age, Relict 
of the late Luke Stoutinburgh, Esq. 

Mr. William Hall, Carpenter. (Friday, April 15, 1768.) 

Died.] Mrs. Mary Skirving, Wife of Mr. William Skirving. 
(Friday, April 22, 1768.) 

Died.] George Cuthbert, Esq; of Georgia. (Friday, April 29, 
1768.) 

Died.] Mr. William Dandridge, Mr. James Streator. (Friday, 
May 6, 1768.) 

Letters from the Cherokee Country inform us of the death of 
Kittagusta, the great Sachem or Prince of Chote and of the whole 
Nation, Brother of Oucconnosta, or the great Warrier, much la- 
mented by all his Countrymen. (Friday, May 13th, 1768.) 

From Wilmington in North Carolina, we have Advice of the 
sudden death of Alexander Duncan, Esq; an eminent Merchant 



88 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

there, on the 4th instant, greatly lamented, being universally be- 
loved and esteemed. It is said, he has by Will, left his Estate to 
his Partners, except a few legacies to Persons in that Province. 
(Friday, June 3, 1768.) 

Died.] Mrs. Sarah Skirving, wife of James Skirving, Esq. 
(Friday, July 1, 1768.) 

Died.] Mrs. Pinckney, Wife of Roger Pinckney, Esq. (Fri- 
day, August 19th, 1768.) 

Died.] Mrs. Beekman, wife of Mr. Barnard Beekman. (Fri- 
day, September 9, 1768.) 

Died.] Mrs. Elizabeth Mullins, Wife of Mr. George MuUins. 
Capt. Henry Richardson. (Friday, Spetember 23, 1768.) 

Died.] On Monday, the 26th instant, at her Country Seat on 
Accabee (much lamented), after a lingering illness, which she bore 
with great Resignation, Mrs. Ellizabeth Elliot, Relict of the late 
Barnard Elliot, Esq; aged 51 years and 7 months. (Friday, Sep- 
tember 30, 1768.) 

Died.] At New York, Capt. John Schermerhorn, many years 
Commander of a vessel in the Trade between New York and this 
Place. At Beaufort, Captain Edward Tucker, formerly command- 
er of one of the Scout-Boats at Charlestown. — Mr. Samuel Peron- 
neau. Merchant. — Mr. George Bedon, Merchant. — Mr. Bennet 
Oldham, and Mr. James O'Brien, Attornies at Law. (Friday, 
October 21, 1768.) 

Died.] Mr. Ezekial David, Merchant. (Friday, November 
4, 1768.) 

Died.] At Silver Bluff, the Seat of George Galpin, Esq; near 
Augusta, Francis MacCartan, Esq; of Augusta, a Gentleman highly 
esteemed for his many amiable qualities. — In Charlestown, Capt. 
William Kenney, of the Ship Amity^s Advice, put in here, in Dis- 
tress, from Jamaica to London. (Friday, November 11, 1768.) 

Died.] Mrs. Hunter, Wife of Mr. James Hunter. (Monday, 
December 12, 1768.) 

Died.] At Philadelphia, Mr. Childermas Harvey, a young 
gentleman of this Province. (Friday, December 19, 1768.) 

Died.] Mrs. Catherine Croft, relict of Childermas Croft, Esq; 
(Monday, December 26, 1768.) 
Died.] Mr. George Livingston Factor. — Mr. William Johnson, 



DEATH NOTICES SO. CA. AND AM. GEN. GAZETTE 89 

School Master, well known by his ingenious Lectures and Experi- 
ments in Electricity. (Monday, January 2, 1769.) 

Died.] Mrs. Mary Pillans, Widow of Doctor William Pillans.— 
Mr. Robert Davies, a native of Wales, in the 108th year of his 
age. (Monday, January 9, 1769.) 

Died.] In the 90th year of her age, Mrs. Anne Peacock, who 
resided in this Province about 50 years. (Monday, January 16, 
1769.) 

Died.] At Dorchester, the 18th instant, Mrs. Mary Mac Niel, 
wife of Dr. Archibald Mac Neil. (Monday, January 23, 1769.) 

Died.] Mrs. Mary Gadsden, Wife of Christopher Gadsden, 
Esq. (Monday, January 30, 1769.) 

Died.] On Tuesday last, George Seaman Esq., in the 64th year 
of his age, formerly an eminent merchant here, who was retired 
from business for years. He live respected and esteemed, and 
died much lamented by those who know him best. A firm and 
steady friend, and a Cheerful companion, a liberal benefactor to 
the poor who will sensibly feel his loss, and to his Servants a kind 
and humane Master. As his deportment through life calm, equal 
and serene, his end was the same, dying fully convinced of the 
Truth of the Christian ReUgion. He has left a handsome Legacy 
to the South Carolina Society, and Sundry ample Sums for other 
charitable and pious purposes. (Monday, February 6, 1769.) 

Died.] Mrs. Frances Prue, Wife of Mr. John Prue. — Mr. 
Archer Smith. (Monday February 20, 1769.) 

On Saturday evening last, a boat with passengers coming down 
the river from Hobcaw, was overset in a gale of wind, and Captain 
George Higgins, of the Snow Portland, in the London trade, Mr. 
Thomas Coleman, upholsterer, Mr. John Hill, son of Mr. John 
Hill, of London, and a negro man, were unfortunately drowned. 
(Monday, March 6, 1769.) 

Died.] "March 5th, in Prince Williams' Parish, where he was 
born, Mr. Robert MacLeod, Merchant, aged 38 years. In him 
that parish has lost one of its most worthy and useful inhabitants; 
there he will be long remembered for his virtues, his innocence of 
life, and for many amiable qualities with which he was endowed; 
his prudent, sober, peaceable, modest humane behaviour, and his 
open fair dealing, gained him an extensive acquaintance, and the 



90 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

esteem of all who had that happiness, by whom he is most justly 
and sincerely lamented. — March 6th, John Cattel, esq; of Wampee, 
Savannah. (Monday March 13, 1769.) 

Died.] Capt. James Rodgers, of the schooner Ballmer. (Mon- 
day, March 20, 1769.) 

Died.] Mr. Thomas Clififord, late of the island of Antigua, 
Merchant. (Monday, April 24, 1769.) 

Died.] Mrs. Martha Bremar, Relict of Mr. Francis Bremar. — 
Mr. William Davis. — Peter Broughton, Esq. (Monday, May 8, 
1769.) 

On Saturday last died, aged 18 months. Miss Harriott-Elizabeth 
Montagu, eldest Daughter of his Excellency the Right Honourable 
Lord Charles-Greville Montague, Governor in Chief &c. of this 
Province. — Captain James Caird, of the Brigantine Aston, of Liver- 
pool, died here last week. — William Russell, Esq; Comptroller of 
the Customs at Savannah, died lately in London, where he had 
been some time, for the Recovery of his Health. (Monday, May 
22, 1769.) 

Died.] In an advanced Age, much lamented, Mrs. Susanna 
Bee, Relict of Colonel John Bee. (Monday, June 12, 1769.) 

Died.] In London, Master James Obrien Parsons, a most 
promising Youth, at Westminster School, son of James Parson, 
Esq; of this Town. — Mr. Charles Jones, of St. Bartholomew's 
Parish, by a fall from his Horse. (Monday, June 20, 1769.) 

Died.] Mr. John St. Leger, Attorney at Law. — ^Mr. Chris- 
topher Simson, Merchant. (Monday, June 27, 1769.) 

Died.] Yesterday, Mr. George Matthews, Merchant. (Mon- 
day, July 10, 1769.) 

Died.] Mrs. Elizabeth Carson, Wife of James Carson, Esq; 
an amiable and worthy woman, most deservedly and generally 
lamented by all who had the Happiness of her Acquaintance. — 
Mrs. Mary Lewis, Relict of Mr. George Lewis. — Mrs. Elizabeth 
Hackett, Wife of Dr. Michael Hackett. (Monday, July 17, 
1769.) 

Died.] Mrs. Catherine Waring, wife of John Waring, Esq. 
(Monday, July 24, 1769.) 

From Beaufort, Port-Royal, we have Accounts, that Mr. Wil- 
liam Shaw, Merchant there, Partner with Mr. Henry Stuart, was 



DEATH NOTICES SO. CA. AND AM. GEN. GAZETTE 91 

unfortunately drowned on Tuesday the 1st instant, as he was 
bathing in the River. The Goodness of his Heart, Humanity, 
and other valuable Qualities, endeared him to every Body, and 
render his Death a real Loss. — On Thursday last died here, beloved 
and regretted by all who knew him, Mr. James Sands, Merchant, 
after a long and painful Illness, which he bore with that Patience 
and Fortitude, which nothing but Christianity can inspire. — 
(Monday, August 7, 1769.) 

Died.] After a long and painful Illness which she bore with 
truly Christian Resignation, Mrs. Elizabeth Clitherall, Wife of 
Dr. James Clitherall. (Wednesday, August 30, 1769.) 

Died.] Mrs. Hannah Patchelbell, Relict of Mr. Charles-Thomas 
Patchelbell. (Wednesday, September 6, 1769.) 

Died.] Thomas Smith, Sen. Esq; — Rev. Mr. John MacLeod, 
Minister at Edisto. — Rev. Mr. Farmer, Rector of St. John, Berk- 
ley County. — Mrs. Anne Walter, Wife of Mr. Thomas Walter. — 
Mrs. Anne Waring, Wife of Richard Waring. (Wednesday, Sep- 
tember 13, 1769.) 

Died.] Mr. Samuel Ball, Sen. Sugar-Baker — Mr. John Taylor. — 
Mrs. Anne Ward, Wife of Mr. John Ward, Talyor. — Mr. Alex- 
ander Hext. (Monday, September 25, 1769.) 

Died.] Much lamented, in the bloom of Youth, Mr. Isaac 
Mathews, son of the late Benjamin Mathews, Esq. (Monday, 
October 2, 1769.) 

Died.] Capt. Edward Lightwood, in an advanced Age. — James 
Reid, Esq; one of the Members of Assembly for the Parish of St. 
Bartholomew. (Monday, October 16, 1769.) 

Died.] In Charlestown, Mrs. Porcher; Rev. Mr. Morgan. — 
In Georgia, IMr. Francis Arthur, Mr. Parsons formerly of Ber- 
muda; Capt. Sarly, of New York. (Monday, October 23, 1769.) 

Died.] Miss Mary HolUday, only Daughter of Mr. William 
Holliday. — Mr. Ezra Waite, Architect. (Thursday, November 
2, 1769.) 

Died.] Mrs. Elizabeth Williams, Wife of Robert Williams, 
Jun. Esq. — Mr. John Snelling, Merchant. — Mr. Thomas Night- 
ingall. — Mr. David Stoddard, Merchant. — Mr. James Duthie. 
(Tuesday, November 7, 1769.) 

Died.] Whitmarsh Fuller, Esq.— Capt. Marshall, of the Brig- 



92 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

antine Prince of Wales, in his Passage from Philadelphia to this 
Port. (Monday, December 4, 1769.) 

Died.] Elijah Prioleau, Esq; formerly of Prince Williams 
Parish. — Mr. John Chapman, Merchant, in Partnership with 
Samuel Brailsford, Esq; now in England. (Wednesday, Decem- 
ber 13, 1769.) 

{To be continued.) 



HISTORICAL NOTES. 



THE BURIAL PLACE OF THE REVEREND WILLIAM SCREVEN. 
130 feet 



This part reserved 




90 feet 


by 

Mr. Elisha 

Screven 


40 ft. 
Lott No. 66 





The above plat and following abstracts from the records in 
Charleston, locate the burial place of the Rev. William Screven, 
the Baptist minister, who came to South Carolina from Kittery, 
Maine, about 1698,^ and died at what is now Georgetown, S. C, 
in 1713. 

William Screven married, June 23, 1674, Bridget Cutts, of 
Maine. He is said to have been born in 1629, if so, then Bridget 
Cutts was possibly a second wife. There are several Screvens to 
be foimd in the early records here, whose names are not given in 
the Cult's Genealogy, and whose relationship to the Rev. William 
Screven have not been found. 

Permanous Screven had a grant" of 500 acres in Berkley County, 
6th Nov. 1704, north on Aaron Screven, South on Champernoxm 
Elliott, east and west not laid out. 

Aaron Screven, grant of 300 acres in Berkley County South on 
Permanous Screven, other sides vacant; 6th Nov. 1704. 

Savill Screven married Martha Bremar, April 29, 1718, and his 
widow married Theodorus Tresevant, Feb. 24, 1720/1.^ 

» This magazine, Vol. 9, pp. 87 and 230. 

2 Proprietor's Grants, Vol. 38, p. 485, in Sec. of State's office, Columbia, S. C. 
' Register of St.' Thomas' and St. Denis, p. 41. 

93 



94 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

One of the Younger Sons of the Rev. William Screven, was Elisha 
(? 1698-1757); he married before 1733, Hannah Commander, 
daughter of Samuel Commander,* of Prince George's and Prince 
Frederick's parishes. Craven County. 

Elisha Screven, on 2d July, 1756,^ as "Elisha Screven of Prince 
Frederick's Winyaw, planter with Hannah his wife" sells to 
Christopher Gadsden of Charles Town, Merchant for £2500 cur- 
rent money of So. Carolina, lots 33 35, 65 and 66 in Georgetown; 
reserving of lot 66 (which measures 100 feet on Prince Street, and 
217y^^ feet deep) to the said Elisha Screven, 130 feet in length 
from Prince Street downwards towards the Bay, eight feet in 
breadth on Prince Street, and the same breadth continued down- 
ward for the length of 90 feet, and from thence 24 feet wide for the 
remaining 40 feet in length, butting and bounding S. W. and N. E. 
on said lot No. 66. S. E. on lot No. 67 and N. E. on Prince Street 
*'as is shown within red lines on plat annexed." 

Rebecca Cooke 1 

Thomas Godfrey >■ Witnesses 

George Bedon JunJ 

Elisha Screven made his will on 18th August 1756, codicil 26th 
November, 1757, date of proof not given. He mentions: his wife 
Hannah; his son Joseph, to whom he gives among other things, 
1300 acres of land in four tracts; son Elisha, 700 acres bought of 
Arthur Foster, one third of 1000 acres on Peedee bought of Othniel 
Beale, bounding on Peedee River and land now Arch. Johnson, 
eight negroes &c.; son Joshua, 700 acres bought of John Goodwin 
and Martha his wife, and 275 acres bought of Alex. Swinton, 
eight negroes &c. Son Samuel, 480 acres bought of John Mc- 
Cants, and one third of the 1000 acres on Peedee, eight negroes. 

Son William (under age), one third of the 1000 acres on Peedee 
and one negro; son Benjamin (under age) lots 185, 186, and 199 in 
Georgetown. Daughter Elizabeth, wife of James Fowler, negro, 
horse, tablespoons, teaspoons, £407 now in her possession, and 
£2000 current money. Daughter Hannah (under age) negro, 
silver teaspoons, horse. Wife Hannah all Silver plate. Wife, Sons 

* Will of Samuel Commander, 11 Sept., 1733. Probate Court, Charleston, 
S. C. 

5 Book Q, Q., M. C. O. Charleston, S. C. 



HISTORICAL NOTES 95 

Elisha, Joshua, Samuel and son William when eighteen, to be exec- 
utors. 18th August 1756. John Walker, James Commander 
and George Commander, witnesses. The codicil, dated 26 No- 
vember, 1757, makes minor changes in the legacies and contains 
the following: "Mem: Son Elisha Screven part of lott in George 
Town by the Number 66, as expressly mentioned in certain inden- 
tures sold to Christopher Gadsden, dated 2 July 1756, for and as a 
burying ground My Father &c. being there buried." 

James Potts Jr. ] 
Abigail Smith j- Witnesses 
Wm.XFullfordJ 
Mark 



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Address: South Carolina Historical Society, 

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THE 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 

MAGAZINE 




PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY THE 

SOUTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



VOLUME XVI, No. 3 



JULY, 191 5 



Entered at the Post-office at Charleston, S. C, as 
Second-Glass Matter 



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE, 

Joseph W. Barnwell, Henry A, M. Smith, 

A. S. Salley, Jr. 

EDITOR OF THE MAGAZINE. 
Mabel L. Webber. 



CONTENTS 

Letters to General Greene and Others 97 

Parish Register of St. James', Santee 109 

Order Book of John Faucheraud Grimke 123 

Death Notices From the South Carolina and American 

General Gazette, and its Continuation the Royal Gazette. 129 

Historical Notes 134 



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free use of the Society's library. 

Any member who has not received the last number will 
please notify the Secretary and Treasurer. 

Miss Mabel L. Webber, 

South Carolina Historical Society, 

Charleston, S. C. 



The South Carolina 

Historical and Genealogical 

Magazine 

VOL. XVI JULY, 1915 No. 3 



LETTERS TO GENERAL GREENE AND OTHERS 

The following letters are printed from the originals in the pos- 
session of Arthur M. Rutledge, Esq., of Louisville, Kentucky. 
They came to him among his father's papers. His father was the 
late Major Arthur Middleton Rutledge, C.S.A., of Nashville, 
Tennessee, who was the son of Henry Middleton Rutledge, Esq., 
originally of Charleston, South Carolina, who moved early in 
the last century to Tennessee, and who was the only son of Edward 
Rutledge, of South CaroHna, who was a member of the Continental 
Congress which made the Declaration of Independence of Fourth 
July, 1776, and was one of the signers of that instrument. At 
the time of his death in 1799 he was Governor of the State of 
South Carolina. These letters may have been a part of his 
papers, although nothing definite is known by the present ovmer 
of the letters as to how they came into the possession of the family. 
He has kindly allowed the Society to pubhsh all that it may con- 
sider to be of historical interest. 

[gen. SUMTER TO GEN. GREENe] 

M"-. Price's 29"^ January, 1781. 
D^ Sir, 

I have received your favours of the 8*-^ one without a date & 
of the IS**^ & 19*h Ins*. 

You express a desire of seeing me again in the field, I am happy 
to know, that the service for which you most Immediately wanted 

97 



98 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

me, is no longer needfull, & Gen^ Morgan has fortunately relieved 
you from your apprehensions for his safety, by defeating Coll. 
Tarleton, a circumstance of great consequence, upon which I 
must beg leave, most heartily to congratulate you. The Methods 
I use to obtain Inteligence may probably answer, but I am short 
in very special requisites for that purpose, when I had the Honour 
of a conference with if I discovered any injudicious thirst for en- 
terprise, private gain, or personal Glory, I am sorry for it, and 
shall be doubly Mortified to find that my endeavours, together 
with the Good people of South Carolina, have not tended the 
least Degree to promote the Publick Good; I lament that private 
Gain is the primary Object with too many, and as much lament 
that the desire of Fame is not more sought after, as to the Former 
the world I think will acquit me, but the latter reason & Con- 
science convinces I have not been arrogant & designing but all- 
ways meant to conduct & demean myself, so as to tend most to the 
Publick Good, & the satisfaction of my superior officers, the difi- 
culty of writing obliges me to decline being as full as I could wish, 
the cause of my not sending you an express on sooner, was in 
hopes of gaining some important Inteligence to Communicate, 
I beUeve you have found that my former intehgence Respecting 
the force of Col°. Tarleton & Gen. Morgan to be very just, I can 
with propriety say that Lord Cornwallis' whole does not exceed 
Sixteen hundred; when they marched from Winnsbourrough, 
and encampt at Bull run, he had but six hundred & Eighty men, 
with this number he marched to turkey crick broad river, was 
there joined by Gen'. Leslie, with a detachment of five hundred & 
Seventy eight m.en rank & file, making in the whole twelve hun- 
dred & fifty eight, since joined by Eighty from Camden, the 
remains of Tarleton's scattered troops, together with the Ma- 
trosses, which when aded cannot by Any Means exceed the Number 
above mentioned. 

for farther particulars & the situation of the Army, I beg leave 
to recommend you to Major Myddelton, as also that of Camden, 
Congarees, Ninety Six, Augusta, & the state of things Generally, 
upon the western Quarter, I agree with you, & lament the great 
probabiHty of this country being laid waste by plundering part es, 
as people Dayly discover a greater avidity to that shamefull 
practice, I had Adopted measures which would have efectually 



LETTERS TO GENERAL GREENE AND OTHERS 99 

suppress^ it, by being wounded & other interuptions have been 
prevented from executing that design, notwithstanding, daring 
as people appear to be in these practices, yet I am convinced 
they mought easily be made to subside. A few examples, & a 
proper abhorrence she wen, would answer every purpose, this 
conduct I meant to pursue but have not been sufficiently 
countinenced nor supported. 

I confess I have been under some embaressment respecting 
Gen. Morgans command, & the orders he has given, as I have 
been concerned but Httle in either trust, & believe I have been 
guilty of no Impropriety, and shall allways make a point to cor- 
respond & act upon such principles with Gen. Morgan, as is most 
likely to tend to the publick Good, aiid have no doubt but he 
well deserves all the applause you have given him, therefore 
will not stand upon little punctilo^. to the prejudice of the serv- 
ice, there has been a great change of things in this Quarter of 
late, & I conceive the Enemy thinks their situations some-what 
unfavourable to themselves, as well as to those Inhabitants among 
which they pass — and notwithstanding, the weak & scattered 
condition of the So. Carolina Malitia, yet their remaining in the 
rear of the Enemy may give them uneasy Apprehensions. Major 
Myddelton will be Able to give you full satisfactions relative to 
this Matter. I still find myself but poorly, but have hopes of 
being able to ride tolerably in a few days, when I shall be happy 
to receive your Commands. 

I have the Hon'" to be D"" Sir with the greatest respect, your 
Most Obed Humble Serv* 

Tho«. Sumter. 
Major Gen^ Greene. 
Endorsed: 

From Gen^ Sumter 
Jan: 29*^ 1781. 



100 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

[BARON STEUBEN TO GEN. GREENe] 

Address: 

The Honorable Major Gen. Green 
Commanding the 

Southern Army 
Steuben 

Richmond Virg^ 2,^ Feb^ 1781 
My Dear General 

Yesterday Major Giles handed me your Letter of the 24* 
Inst. & I sincerely Congratulate you on the fortunate & glorious 
events it anounces — your presence to the Southard has hitherto 
been favored with the Smiles of Fortune — may you my dear 
General experience a continuance of them the personal interest 
I take in every theory that can add to your Happiness & Glory 
is an additional motive for my wishing it. 

Mr. Arnold still continues at Portsmouth — his incursions into 
this State notwithstanding the weak opposition I was able to 
oppose has not drawn my attention from the main object of rein- 
forcing your Army, Delay was unavoidable — it was the natural 
result of the confusion that every thing was thrown into. 

The second division of 400 Men which I expect to have sent off 
the 15 Jan^ will not possibly be equipped for the March before 
the 20*^ Instant I am determined to move Heaven & Earth to 
get them off if possible by that time. The 10*^ Ins. is the time 
fixed for the ofi&cers of the Virg Line to assemble at Chesterfield 
— I have given orders for relieving those of them who are now with 
the Militia by the Supernumerary & State Officers — Gen'. Lawson 
will relieve Gen'. Muhlenberg — some necessary arrangements 
to be made at Fredericksburg will prevent Gen. Wasn[?] from at- 
tending — I shall first appoint the Officers who are to attend at 
the places of rendezvous to receive the recruits — & send them 
immediately to their respective parts — A Field Officer 4 Capt^. 
& 14 Subs will go with the first detachment to the southward 
& so with the rest. 

The Cavalry are to rendezvous at Petersburg when I shall 
deliver them their proportion of the recruits as they come in & 
shall take the necessary measures with Government to get them 
mounted & Equipped which done I propose sending them on by 
Troops of 60 Horse, 30 for each Regiment. 



LETTERS TO GENERAL GREENE AND OTHERS 101 

The number of Recruits to be raised added to what they have 
now in the Field will fall deficient at least one fourth of the Quota 
of this State,— this must be considered in the formation of the 
new Regiments the strength of which must bear the same pro- 
portion to the number originally designed for each. 

I believe I before advised you of my intention to form the 
remains of the 9th Reg. at Fort Pitt into two Companies & to 
call down the supernumary officers General Washington has 
approved it and I have accordingly given the necessary Orders 
to Col«. Broadhead & Gibern [?]. 

Agreeable to your orders I have directed Cap. Jicst [sic] with 
his artificers to move immediately to Bethany — I am intirely of 
your opinion that this Corp weak as it is will render much more 
service at that place considering its proximity to you & the num- 
ber of Arms in that Neighbourhood wanting repair. 

I have just reced advice of a movement of the Enemy towards 
Suffolk tho with what force I don't know, I am just setting off 
for Cobbin point but shall not let it prevent my meeting the 
officers the 10*^ Inst, at Chesterfield. 

With the greatest regard 

I am D^ Gen' 

Your very hun Serv^ 
Steuben, Maj: Gen: 
Endorsed 
From Baron Steuben 
Feb'^ 3^ 1781. 

[ANDREW PICKENS TO GEN. GREENE.] 

Camp, Enoree river, S°. Carolina, S*'' April, 1781 
Sir, 

Immediately after I did myself the Honor of writing you from 
the Catawba, I marched for the Southward, On my arrival at 
Broad river I met Colonel Clark of Georgia on his retreat from 
the long Cane Settlement, where, on the 23^. of last month he 
had a smart action with Major Dunlap, commanding a party of 
Cavalry and Infantry consisting of about ninety Men. The Colo- 
nels force was about one hundred and eighty, which he divided 

1 Only the signature is in Steuben's hand writing. 



102 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

with two divisions, reserving out of them a small party to act 
as Dragoons. The attack was made by the Colonel with vigour 
and resolution and the Efforts of the Enemy to repel our men, 
notwithstanding the advantage of situation on their side was vain 
and ineffectual. Our Militia Horse charged their regulars who 
fled with precipitation altho their number exceeded ours. The 
Infantry after the flight of their Horse retreated to some Houses 
and, after some time surrendered prisoners of war. A number 
of the Colonels Men had no Arms which brings down the dispro- 
portion of numbers. The Enemys loss was great for the amount 
of men, their Horse being chiefly killed in the flight, and great 
part of the Infantry before they surrendered. 

The Prisoners are gone towards Virginia by way of the Moun- 
tains, among them three Officers, Captain Cozens and Ensigns 
Old and Swanton all belonging to the Garrison of Ninety Six. 
I am exceedingly sorry to inform you of the inhuman action com- 
mitted on Major Dunlap after being deliviered by Colonel Clark 
into the hands of a Guard prepared for that purpose at Gilbert 
Town in North Carolina. A set of men, chiefly unknown except 
one — Cobb an over Mountain Man forced the Guard and shot 
him. I have issued a Proclamation offering a reward of ten 
thousand dollars for the apprehending him and do not despair 
of yet getting him and sending him to you. I sent a Flag to Colo- 
nel Cruger intimating the matter to him and informed him with 
what horror and detestation American OfiScers looked on the act, 
intimating however, that the many barbarous massacres com- 
mitted by those calling themselves their officers on our people after 
their capture, particularly the murder of Captain Watson a val- 
uable young officer under the sanction of their own Flag might 
have actuated those persons to that mode of redress. I should 
inclose you a copy of my letter to him but it is misplaced I send 
you however a copy of his answer by which you will perceive 
his sentiments. 

The Country here is in the greatest distress chiefly broken up 
for want of assistance, by the Enemy's marauding and plunder- 
ing parties and unless something can shortly be done for them 
I am afraid they will in a great measure altogether quit the parts 
and had I not arrived at the time I did on Tiger River, I have 
reason to believe the whole Country would been evacuated by 



LETTERS TO GENERAL GREENE AND OTHERS 103 

our Friends. Colonel Cruger being reinforced by Innis's Corps 
marched with about three hundred regulars and two Hundred 
Tories and took post at Harrison's store on Fair Forest the thirty- 
first Ultimo with an intention as was supposed and given out 
to establish a Garrison. I immediately collected the South 
Carolinians and being joined by the Georgians I determined to 
risque an Action and was advanced some way towards him, when 
I was informed he has made the best of his way for William's 
Fort fifteen Miles this side of Ninety Six; where I am informed he 
has taken post. You may assure yourself Sir, I shall do all in 
my power to prevent their return; but provision is so scarce 
it will be exceedingly difficult to maintain even the smallest party 
on this side that station, [sic] I have wrote General Sumter 
requesting him to assist me but have receved as yet no answer 
I shall write him again but with what probability of success I 
know not. I must beg you to send me by this opportunity the 
most material intelligence as there is no centainty to be learnt 
here of any Event. 
I am Sir with respect 

Y' very humble Serv*. 

And^. Pickens^ 

I have sent you three receips of Officers Servants taken at Tarl- 
tons defeat. 

1 must remark again to you I do not think my force sufficient 
unless speedily assisted to make a stand this side any way nigh 
the Fort. 

In Dunlaps Defeat 34 killed, & 42 taken done by Col. Clark 
near Ninety Six 

Honble Major Gen^ Greene. 

Endorsed 
From Gen^ Pickens 
8 April 1781. 

2 Only the signature in Picken's hand writing. 



104 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

[ISAAC SHELBY TO GEN. GREENE?] 

Camp on Wattango Washington County- 
North CaroHna S'^. August 1781 
Hon-i. Sir 

In answer to your request of the 22d. June last I rote you by 
the Express, that I should March by the IS*'' July with what 
force cou'd be rais'd in this quarter, but the Cherokee Treaty 
not being over found it impracticable to draw any force from here 
untill that important Business (to this frontier) was finally rati- 
fied, which was done the 29*^ July, and immediately every step 
taken to reinforce you; about 700 good rifle men well mounted 
were now in motion towards you & should have been down in as 
short a time as possible but an Express arrived in camp last night 
from General Pickens that informed us of the Enemys retreat to 
Orrangeburgh and perhaps to Charles Town, that distance being 
so very great for us, the warm season of the year & the men 
not prepared for so long a Tower, has induced Col. Levere of this 
County and my self from proceeding on our march, untill one 
hear farther accounts from that quarter tho the men are ordered 
to hold themselves in readiness to march on the shortest notice, 
and as our country is now in a state of peace and tranquillity, 
have no doubt but we can furnish you with a large proportion of 
good men from here when ever you may find necessary to require us. 

I have the honour to be w*''. respect 

Your M°. Ob*. Humb^^ Serv*. 

Isaac Shelby. 
Endorsed: 
From Col°. Shelby 

Aug*. 3d, 1781 



LETTERS TO GENERAL GREENE AND OTHERS 105 
[lT. col. WASHINGTON TO GEN. GREENe] 

[Addressed: 

The Hob'<= 

Maj. Gen^ Greene 
Faver'd by 

Maj. Marsbanck [Majoribanks] 

Eutaw. Sep*. S'^, 1781 
Sir 

I have the Misfortune to be a Prisoner of war, I am wounded 
with a Bayonet in my Breast, which together with the Contusion 
from the fall off my Horse which was killed makes me extremely 
sore: But I am in hope not dangerous. 

I shall be extremely obliged to forward the enclosed to Capt. 
Watts & permit my Cloathing to be sent in as soon as Possible 
being informed by Col. Stuart that I am not to be indulg'd with 
a Parole on any Latitude. I have been treated politely by many 
of the British officers. 
I have the Honor to be y". 

Very H. Serv*., 
W. Washington 
Maj. Gen'. Greene. 

Endorsed: 
Lieut Col°. Washington 
September 8th '81. 

[gOVENOR JOHN RUTLEDGE TO GEN. GREENe] 

Addressed: 

The Ho'ble Major Gen'. Greene. 

Congaree Sep. lO^i^ 1781. 
D^: Sir 

I rec.'' last night, your favor of yesterday, & thank you for the 
Communication of the [illegible] it contained— I congratulate, 
most heartily on the glorious Victory of the Sth^ — I hope you 
will be able to Clean up & improve it — &, if the Enemy will quit 
their Strong Hold (w'='' they cannot occupy long) I think you will 
give the finishing Blow to their possessions in the Country, by 

3 Battle of Eutaw. 



106 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

the total destruction of the remains of their army, whose spirits 
must be much lowered — at any rate, I conceive, should they be 
so fortunate as to get off, their well Men, by a rapid Moonlight 
March, they must commit their numerous wounded to your 
Mercy — May Heaven protect you my dear Sir, & always give 
you the Success you deserve, 

Y^^ Sincerly 
J. Rutledge. 
Endorsed: 
From Gov. Rutledge 
Sept. IQth 1781. 

[FRANCIS MARION TO GEN. GREENE.] 

Addressed: 

The Honb'^ Maj. Gen^. Greene. 

Doughtys Plant"*. Santee [?1 
9*^ Oct. 1781. 
Sir: 

Col°. Maham has returned without meeting with any party of 
the Enemy, he was within a mile of the main body. 

The night above last the Enemy moved their boats from Porchers 
but cannot yett find where to. 

I have been Obliged to move for want of Ammunition as I have 
not one round p^. man & Shud the Enemy Attempt crossing a 
party I must retire. I have sent the Bearer for a supply of Anm". 
if you cannot spare it I must get under your protection. 

I hear there is two vessels of fever [?] off the Bar of Ch Town an 
Embargo is laid on the Ships — & orders to Gen. Gold [Gould] 
to hold himself in readiness to march to Charlestown at the shortest 
notice which is the reason of them keeping so close. 

The Gen', is very 111 at Mahams or the Army was to make a 
movement on Saturday last. 

I have the honour to be your Ob*. S"*. 

Francis Marion 



LETTERS TO GENERAL GREENE AND OTHERS 107 

[col. WILLIAM HARDING TO GEN. GREENE] 

Addressed: 

Major Gen. NatW. Greene 
Commas, the 

American Army 

at Santee. ■ ' 

P^- M'. Box 

Express 

Pocotaligo 7^^ Nov.b'- 1781. 
Sir 

Though I have not the pleasure of being Acquainted with you, 
I have taken the hberty to inform you when the British came to 
this place some time in Sep*'', for Rice, I detached Major Cooper 
with a Command to destroy the barr'^: to prevent the Enemy 
from Moving the Rice, Major Eraser with his Horse attacked 
Major Cooper, & took three of his men, in my absence a Elagg 
was sent by Major Cooper to get those men Exchanged, Cap*. 
Melton & Simon Eraser, went with the Elagg, who was met by 
Major Eraser, & seeing Simon Eraser's name in the Elagg, he rode 
back to Camp & desired the Elagg to wait for an Answer, when he 
returned with two Dragoons and ast Simon Eraser if he was the 
man who kild Ingles, Eraser replied he was, he was then taken & 
carried & put in Irons & now is in the provost, on pretence that 
Ingles was Murdered. 

When Gen. Marion ordered me to the S° Ward Eraser Came 
with me, On my arrival at the Round O — I sent a comm''. to take 
the Eield Officers of that Reg™*. They surroundered Major 
CHtheraf's House, & Eraser ordered the door to be Opened, which 
was done. Ingles then ast who was there. Eraser answered friends 
to America, Ingles then went to Shut the door when Eraser fired 
at him & shott him in the Body, & he in a few minutes died. 

Clitheral was made a Prisoner & brought to me the next day, 
& S<^. he was Shure Eraser would not have Shot Ingles, had he 
not attempted to Shut the door, this Sir is the pretended Murder 
for which he is detained, he has & the rest of the prisoners has 
sent to me to state this IMatter to your Honor, to see if you will 
get them releast, from their confinement. A Cap*. Palmer who 
was taken sometime Ago, by a party of men I sent to stop some 



108 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Boats, he is in a poor State of hilth & is verry Desireous to be 
Exchanged that he may go to his Reg."* he is one of Lord Charles'es 
Core that is gone to the W^*. Indies, if you think proper he sals 
the Comm'^^. will Exchange him for a Cap*, of ours. 

I have this Moment reC^. Express from L*. Col°. Sanders that 
the Enemy is Collecting their Horse at Dorchester, & from 
good Authority means to Come S°. Ward to Burn all the Crops, 
they can & to Collect all the Cattle. They are Killing & Salting 
up all the Beef on Port Royall Island, when I am told they mean 
to Come On the Main its nots improbable but what they may 
Endeavour to form a junction, I will make Every Endeavour 
to prevent them from their Intention should they attempt any- 
thing of the kind, but dont think we will have sufficient Force 
unless you can give some assistance — I will be much Obliged to 
you for some powder, for my Reg"^* as we are in want of that 
Article. 

I have Sir the honour to be Sir 

Your Hon'. Most Ob*. Serv*, 
Will"^. Harding Col . Comm^^s. 

the S°. Ward Militia 
N B the names of the Prisoners 

Jn°. Greggs 

Geo. Jones 

Sol™. Legare 

Atkin Channel 

Simon Eraser 



Cap*. Rob*. Palmer, of the British 

Endorsed: 

from Col°. Harding 

Nov'. 7*\ 1781 

{To he continued) 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 

1758-1788 

Copied by Mabel L. Webber 

{Continued from the April Number) 

142 : Childermas Croft of the Parish of Prince George, "Widower, 
and Ellen Rawlins of this Parish, Spinster, were married in the 
Dwelling-house of Mr. Anthony Simons of this Parish, by Licence, 
this Sixteenth Day of August, in the year of our Lord 1781, by 
me S. F. Warren of this Parish, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 Childermas Croft 

Solemnized between usj Ellen Rawlins 

In the Presence of Anthony Simons 

W-. Cleiland. 

143: Alexander M° Clencher of the Parish of Prince-George, 
Bachelor, and Mary Falks of the Parish of Prince- George, Widow, 
were married at Clement Brown's Ferry of the Parish of Prince- 
George, By Banns, this Tenth day of January, in the year of our 
Lord, 1782, by me S. F. Warren, of the Parish of St. James' San- 
tee, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Alexander M^Chntig 

Solemnized between usj Mary Falks X her mark 

In the Presence of [No witnesses given.] 

144: Peter Rembert of the Parish of Prince- George, Widower, 
and Cecelia Dexter of the Parish of Prince-Frederick, Widow, 
were married at the Dwelling house of the Rev'd. S. F. Warren, 
of this Parish, by Banns, this Twenty-fifth day of Jan'y in the 
year of our Lord, 1782, by me, S. F. Warren of this Parish, Clerk. 
This marriage was \ Peter Rembert 

Solemnized between us/ Cecelia Dexter 

In the Presence of Jacob Jeanneret 

Magdalen Jeanneret. 
109 



110 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

145: Thomas Daves of this Parish, Bachelor, and Mary Cross 
of this Parish, Widow, were married in the DwelHng-house of Mary- 
Cross, of this Parish, by Banns, this Fifth Day of February, 
in the year of our Lord, 1782, by me S. F. Warren, of this Parish, 
Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Tho^. Davis 

Solemnized between usj Mary Cross 

In the Presence of John Drake 

Thomas Parker. 

146: Thomas Thirsting of the Parish of Prince-George, Bach- 
elor, and Jean Hinds of the Parish of Prince George, Widow, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of the Rev'd. S. F. Warren 
of this Parish, by Banns, this Eleventh Day of April in the year 
of our Lord, 1782, by me, S. F. Warren of this Parish, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 Thomas Thirsting X mark 

Solemnized between us J Jane Hinds 

In the Presence of Isaac Delisseline 

Mary M'^Collough. 

147: Henry Le Nud of the Parish of Prince-George Bachelor, 
and Elizabeth Croft of the Parish of Prince- George, W^idow, were 
married at the Plantation of Mrs. Elizabeth Croft, of the Parish 
of Prince George, by Banns, this Thirteenth Day of June, in the 
year of our Lord, 1782, by me S. F. Warren, of the Parish of St. 
James' Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was \ H. Le Nud 

Solemnized between usj Eliz*". Croft. 

In the Presence of Peter Guerry 

Anthony Bonneau. 

148: Peter Butt of the Parish of Prince-George, Bachelor, 
and Elizabeth Harvey of the Parish of Prince George, Spinster, 
were married at the Dwelling-house of Mrs. Eliz. Harvey of the 
Parish of Prince George, widow, by Licence, this Tenth day of 
July, in the year of our Lord, 1782, by me, S. F. Warren of the 
Parish of St. James' Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was \ 

Solemnized between us/ [All names omitted.] 

In the Presence of 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 111 

149: Manasseh Micheau of the Parish of Prince-George, 
Bachelor, and Anne Guerry of the Parish of Prince- George, Spin- 
ster, were married in the Dwelling-house of Peter Guerry, Sen''. 
of the Parish of Prince George, by Licence, this Nineteenth day 
of July in the year of our Lord, 1782, by me, S. F. Warren, of St. 
James' Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Manasseh Michau 

Solemnized between us J Ann Guerry. 

In the Presence of Geo: Mcdowell 

Edward Croft. 

150: Edward Mitchell of the Parish of All Saints, Bachelor, 
and Mary Moore of the Parish of St. Thomas, Spinster, were 
married at the Dwelling-house of Mrs. Allston of the Parishof All- 
saints, by Licence, this Twenty Ninth day of July, in the year of 
our Lord, 1782, by me, S. F. Warren of the Parish of St. James 
Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Edw*^. Mitchell 

Solemnized between us J Mary Moore. 

In the Presence of Tho. Waties 

Peter M. Neufville. 

151: Calvin Spencer of the Parish of Prince- George, Bachelor, 
and Rebecca Ford of the Parish of Prince-George, Spinster, were 
married at the Plantation of Mrs. Bonneau of the Parish of Prince- 
George, Widow, by Licence, this Twenty-second day of August, 
in the year of our Lord, 1782, by me, S. F. Warren, of the Parish 
of St. James' Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Calvin Spencer 

Solemnized between us J Rebecca Ford 

In the Presence of , Step". Ford Jun, 

Alex''. Petrie. 

152: William Hasell Gibbes of the Parish of Prince-George, 
Bachelor, and Elizabeth Allston of the Parish of All Saints, Spin- 
ster, were married at the Dwelling-house of Mrs. Alston [sic] of 
the Parish of Allsaints, Widow, by Licence, this Twenty-ninth 
day of Augt. Anno Domini, 1782, by me, S. F. Warren of the 
Parish of St. James' Santee, Clerk. 



112 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

This marriage was 1 W". Hasell Gibbes 

Solemnized between usj Elizabeth Allston 

In the Presence of Benj''. Allston 

Ann Allston. 

153: John Smith of this Parish, Widower, and Mary Long of 
the Parish of St. Thomas, Widow, were married in the Dwelling- 
house of S. F. Warren of this Parish, Clerk, by Banns, this Nine- 
teenth day of September, Anno Domini 1782, by me S. F. Warren, 
of this Parish, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 John Smith X his mark 

Solemnized between usj Mary Long 

In the Presence of John Connors 

Lydia Perdricau. 

154: Isaac Legare Jun"". of the Parish of Christ-church, Bache- 
lor, and Martha White of the Parish of St. James' Santee, Spinster, 
were married at the Dwelling-house of Mr. John White of the 
Parish of Prince-George, by Licence, this Third day of October 
Anno Domini 1782, by me S. F. Warren of the Parish of St. James' 
Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Isaac Legare Ju'. 

Solemnized between usj Martha White 

In the Presence of Geo. M'^dowell 

Jn°. Buchanan. 

155: John Stephenson of the Parish of St. Michael Charles- 
town, Bachelor, and Mary Pacy of this Parish, Spinster, were 
married at the Dwelling-house of Mrs. Lewis of this Parish, Widow, 
by Banns, this Fifteenth day of October, Anno Domini, 1782, 
by me S. F. Warren, of this Parish, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 John Stevenson 

Solemnized between usj Marey Paecy 

In the Presence of Elizabeth Barton 

Sarah Piercey. 

156: Hill Hewet of the Parish of Prince-George, Bachelor 
and Martha England of the Parish of Prince-George, Spinster, 
were married at the Dwelling-house of S. F. Warren, of this Parish, 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 113 

Clerk, by Banns, this Thirtieth day of October, Anno Domini, 
1782, by me, S. F. Warren, of this Parish, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 Hill Hewet X his mark 

Solemnized between us J Martha England X her mark 

In the Presence of Joseph DeLessline 

Susanna England X her mark. 

157: John Cryer of the Parish of Prince George, Bachelor 
and Ruth Noble of the Parish of Prince George, Spinster, were 
married in the Dwelling house of Alexander Anderson of the Parish 
of Prince George, by Licence, this First day of November, Anno 
Domini, 1782, by me, S. F. Warren of the Parish of St. James 
Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was \ John Cryer 

Solemnized between us/ Ruth Noble 

In the Presence of Martha Cryer 

Alexander Anderson. 

158: Thomas England of the Parish of Prince George, Bache- 
lor, and Elizabeth Rembert of the Parish of Prince George, Widow, 
were married at the Dwelling-house of Mr. Isaac Rembert Junior 
of the Parish of Prince Frederick, by Licence, this Twelth Day 
of November, Anno Domini, 1782, by me, S. F. Warren, of the 
Parish of St. James' Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Thos. England X his mark 

Solemnized between us J Eliz: Rembert X her mark. 

In the Presence of Jacob Jeanneret Jun''. 

Isaac Rembert Jun''. 

159: Peter Guerry of Prince George Parish, Junior, Bachelor 
and Catherine Rembert, of the Parish of Prince Frederick Spin- 
ster, were married at the Dwelling-house of Isaac Rembert of the 
Parish of Prince Frederick, by Licence, this Twelth day of No- 
vember, Anno Domini, 1782, by me, S. F. Warren, of y" Parish 
of St James' Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was \ Peter Guerry Jun"" 

Solemnized between us/ Catherine Rembert 

In the Presence of Legrand Guerry 

Jacob Jeanneret Jun''. 



114 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

160: John Murry [sic] of the Parish of Prince-Frederick, 
Bachelor, and Margaret Hughes of the Parish of Prince Frederick, 
Spinster, were married at the Dwelling-house of Mr. Henry 
Hughes of the Parish of Prince Frederick, by Licence, this Twenty- 
Eight day of November, Anno Domini 1782, by me S. F. Warren 
of the Parish of St. James' Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 Jn°. IMurray. 

Solemnized between us J Margaret Hughes 

In the Presence of Henry Hughes 

Randolph Threes [?] 

161: Peter Le Nud of the Parish of Prince-Frederick, Bache- 
lor, and Lydia Jaudon of the Parish of Prince-Frederick, Spinster, 
were married at the Dwelling-house of Mr. \V™. Leigh of the 
Parish of Prince-Frederick, by Licence, this Ninth Day of Jan- 
uary, Anno Domini 1783, by me, S. F. Warren of the Parish 
of St. James' Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 Peter Le Nud 

Solemnized between usj Lydia Jaudon. 

In the Presence of Geo. M'dowell 

Thomas Leigh. 

162: Daniel Joulee of this Parish, Bachelor, and Constant 
June of this Parish, Spinster, were married at the Dwelling-house 
of John Jaudon, of this Parish, by Licence, this Thirteenth day 
of March, Anno Domini, 1783, by me, S. F. Warren, of this Parish, 
Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Daniel Joulee 

Solemnized between usj Constant June. 

In the Presence of John Jaudon 

Edward June. 

163: Joseph-Raven Mathews, of the Parish of Prince George, 
Bachelor, and Faith Smith of the Parish of Prince- George, Spinster, 
were married at the Dwelling-house of the Reve'nd S. F.Warren, 
of this Parish, Clerk, by Licence, this Fifteenth day of March, 
Anno Domini, 1783. 

This marriage was 1 Jon. R. Mathews 

Solemnized between usj Faith Smith 

In the Presence of Isaac Delisseline 

Lydia Perdrieau 
Married by me, S. F. Warren of this Parish, Clerk. 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 115 

164: William Bonhoste of the Parish of Christ-Church, Bache- 
lor, and Mary Bell, of this Parish, Spinster, were married at the 
Dwelling-house of Mrs. Eliz: Bell of this Parish, Widow, by 
Licence, this Twenty-seventh day of March, Anno Domini, 1783, 
by me, S. F. Warren, of this Parish, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 W°^. Bonhoste 

Solemnized between us J Mary Bell. 

In the Presence of Hester Bonhoste 

Eliza. Miot. 

165: Ruffin Taylor of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Bache- 
lor, and Anne Heughes [sic] of the Parish of Prince Frederick, 
Widow, were married in the Dwelling-house of Mrs. Anne Heughes 
of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Widow, by Licence, this Twenty 
fourth day of April, Anno Domini, 1783, by me, S. F. Warren, 
of the Parish of St. James' Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 Ruffen Taylor 

Solemnized between usj Ann Hughes 

In the Presence of Geo. Ford 

William Barton. 

166: Andrew Mills of the Parish of Prince-George, Widower, 
and Susanna England of the Parish of Prince -George, Widow, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of the Reverend Samuel 
Fenner Warren of this Parish, Clerk, by Licence, this Thirteenth 
Day of May, Anno Domini, 1783, by me S. F. Warren of this 
Parish, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 And. Mills. 

Solemnized between us J Susanna England X her mark 

In the Presence of Samuel Warren 

us Lydia Perdrieau. 

167: William Tarbox of the Parish of Prince-George, Bache- 
lor; and Sabina Rembert of the Parish of Prince- George, Spinster, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of the Reverend Samuel 
Fenner Warren of this Parish, Clerk, by Licence, this Twenty- 
Ninth day of May, Anno Domini, 1783, by me, S. F. Warren, 
of this Parish Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 William Tarbox 

Solemnized between usj Sabina Rembert X her mark 

In the Presence! Nicholas Boshat 

of us j Samuel Warren. 



116 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

168: Michael Rembert of the Parish of Prince-George, Widow- 
er, and Mary Bocliet of the Parish of Prince George, Spinster, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of the Reverend Samuel 
Fenner Warren of this Parish, Clerk, by Licence, this Twenty 
Ninth Day of. May, Anno Domini, 1783. 
This marriage was 1 Michal Rembert 

Solemnized between usj Mary Bocbet 

In the Presence 1 Nicholas Boshat 

of us J Samuel Warren 

169: Joachim Rembert of the Parish of Prince-George, Bache- 
lor, and Obedience Cook of the Parish of Prince George, Spinster, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of the Reverend S. F. Warren 
of this Parish by Licence this Eleventh day of June, Anno Domini, 
1783, by me S. F. Warren of this Parish, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 Joachim Rembert 

Solemnized between us J Obedience Cook 

In the Presence of Jacob Jeanneret 

Mary Rembert. 

170: James Anderson of this Parish, Bachelor, and Anne 
Lewis of this Parish, Widow, were married in the Dwelling-house 
of the Reverend S. F. Warren of this Parish, by Licence, this 
Twenty-sixth day of June, Anno Domini, 1783, by me S. F. War- 
ren of this Parish, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Jas. Anderson 

Solemnized between us J Anne Lewis X her Mark 

In the Presence of us Henry Hughes 

Samuel Warren. 

171: Daniel Lewis of the Parish of St. Johns Bachelor, and 
Hannah Lewis of this Parish, Spinster, were married at. the Dwell- 
ing-house of the Reverend Sam'l F. Warren of this Parish by 
Licence, this Twenty Ninth day of June Anno Domini, 1783, 
by me S. F. Warren of this Parish, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 Daniel Lewis 

Solemnized between us J Hannah Lewis 

In the Presence of us Daniel M'Gregor 

Samuel Warren 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 117 

172: Henry Hallam of this Parish, Bachelor, and Mary Bon- 
hoste of this Parish, Spinster, were married in the Dwelling-house 
of Mr. Jonah Collins of this Parish, by Licence, this Twenty- 
fourth day of July Anno Domini, 1783, by me S. F. Warren of 
this Parish, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Henry Hallam 

Solemnized between usj Mary Bonhoste 

In the Presence of us Jn°. Jonah Murrell 

Daniel M' Gregor. 

173: John Buchanan of the Parish of Prince-George, Bachelor, 
and Elizabeth Miott of this Parish, Spinster, were married in the 
Dwelling-house of Mrs. Eliz: Bell of this Parish — Widow, by 
Licence, this Twenty-first day of August — Anno Domini 1783, 
by me S. F. Warren, of this Parish, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 Jn°. Buchanan 

Solemnized between usj Elizabeth Miott. 

In the Presence of us Mary Withers 

Charlotte Withers. 

174: Richard Philsbee of the Parish of St. Thomas, Bachelor, 
and Sarah Bennett of this Parish, Spinster, were married in the 
Dv/elling-house of the Reverend Samuel F. Warren of this Parish, 
by Licence, this Thirtieth day of October Anno Domini, 1783, 
by me S. F. Warren, of this Parish, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 Richard Philsbee 

Solemnized between usj. Sarah Bennett X her mark 

In the Presence of us Peter Guerry 

Samuel Warren. 

175: Joseph Wragg of the Parish of Prince-George, Bachelor, 
and Eleona Mouzon of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Spinster, 
were married in the DwelHng- house of Mr. Stephen Ford of the 
Parish of Prince-Frederick, by Licence this Sixth day of Novem- 
ber, Anno Domini 1783, by me S. F. Warren, of the Parish of St. 
James' Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Jos: Wragg. 

Solemnized between usj Eleanor Mouzon 

In the Presence of us G. W. Ford 

Erasmus Rothmahler. 



118 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

176: Le Grand Guerry of the Parish of Prince-George, Bache- 
lor, and Dorothy Guerry of the Parish of St. Stephens, Spinster, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of Mrs. Dorothy Guerry of 
the Parish of St. Stephen's, by Licence, this Fourth Day of Decem- 
ber, Anno Domini, 1783, by me S. F. Warren of the Parish of 
St. James' San tee. Clerk. 

This marriage was \ LeGrand Guerry 

Solemnized between us/ Dorothy Guerry 

In the Presence of us Elizabeth IMichau 

Esther Perdriau 

177: John Williams of the Parish of Allsaints Bachelor and 
Elizabeth- Anne Willingham of this Parish, Spinster, were married 
at Echaw Chapel of this Parish by Licence this Nineteenth day of 
February Anno Domini, 1784, by me S. F. Warren of this Parish, 
Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 John Williams 

Solemnized between us J Elizabeth Ann Willingham 

In the Presence of us Christopher Willingham 

Samuel Warren. 

178: James Guerin of the Parish of Prince- Frederick, Bachelor, 
and Martha Guerin of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Spinster, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of the Reverend Samuel Fen- 
ner Warren of this Parish, by Licence, this Second day of March, 
Anno Domini, 1784, by me S. F. Warren of this Parish. 
This marriage was \ James Guerin 

Solemnized between us/ Martha Guerin 

In the Presence of us Sam^ Jaudon 

W'". Anthony Atkinson. 

179: Robert Simons of the Parish of Prince George, Bachelor, 
and Mary White of the Parish of Prince Frederick Spinster, were 
married in the Dwelling-house of Mr. Stephen Ford of the Parish 
of Prince Frederick by Licence, this Eighteenth day of March, 
Anno Domini, 1784. 

This marriage was 1 Rob*. Simons 

■Solemnized between us/ Mary White 

In the Presence of us Steph". Ford Junr. 

William Barton 
Married by me S. F. Warren of the Parish of St. James Santee, 
Clerk. 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 119 

180: Samuel DuBose of the Parish of St. Stephens, Bachelor 
and Elizabeth Sinkler of the Parish of St. Stephens Spinster, were 
married in the Dwelling-house of Mr. James Sinkler of the Parish 
of St. Stephens, by Licence, this Twenty fourth day of March, 
Anno Domini, 1784 by me S. F. Warren of the Parish of St. James 
Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Samuel Dubose 

Solemnized between usj Elizabeth Sinkler 

In the Presence of us John Couturier 

Peter Gaillard 

181: Benjamin Guerry of the Parish of St. Stephens, Bachelor, 
and Lydia Micheau of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Spinster, 
were married in the Dwelling house of Mr. Paul Micheau of the 
Parish of Prince Frederick, by Licence, this first day of April, 
Anno Domini, 1784, by me S. F. Warren of the Parish of St. 
James' Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Benj'^. Guerry 

Solemnized between us J Lydia Michau 

In the Presence of us Elizabeth Michau 

A. Caleb Guerry. 

182: Elias Vanderhorst of the Parish of St. Thomas, Bachelor, 
and Sarah Withers of this Parish Spinster, were married in the 
Dwelling-house of Capt. Richard Withers of this Parish, by 
Licence, this First day of April, Anno Domini, 1784, by me S. F. 
Warren of this Parish, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Elias Vanderhorst 

Solemnized between usj Sarah Collins Withers 

In the Presence of us Wm. Douxsaint 

James Withers. 

183: John Porter of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Bachelor, 
and Anne Dexter of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Spinster, were 
married in the DwelHng-house of Mr. Benjamin Porter of the 
Parish of Prince Frederick, by Licence, this Fifteenth day of 
April Anno Domini, 1784, by me S. F. Warren of the Parish of 
St James Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 John Porter 

Solemnized between usj Anne Dexter 

In the Presence of us Sam'. Cooper 

Anthony Ford. 



120 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

184: Joseph Glover of the Parish of Prince George, widower, 
and EHzabeth Jeanneret of the Parish of Prince Frederick Spinster, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of Francis Marshall M.D. 
of the Parish of Prince Frederick, by Licence this Fifteenth day 
of April, Anno Domini 1784, by me S. F. Warren of the Parish 
of St. James Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 J. Glover 

Solemnized between us J Eliza: Jeanneret. 

In the Presence of us Francis Marshall 

John [illegible]. 

185: George Bear of this Parish, Widower and Anne England 
of this Parish, Spinster, were married at the Plantation of Mrs. 
Tidyman of this Parish, by Licence, this Twenty seventh day of 
April, Anno Domini, 1784, by me S. F. Warren of this Parish, 
Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 George Bear 

Solemnized between us J Anne England X her mark 

In the Presence of us John Wirosdick 

And^. Mills. 

186: John Blake of this Parish, Bachelor, and Mary Jeanneret 
of this Parish, Spinster, were married in the Dwelling-house of 
Mr. Jacob Jeanneret of this Parish Sen"", by Licence this Twenty 
Eight day of April, Anno Domini 1784, by me S. F. Warren of 
this Parish, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Jn°. Blake 

Solemnized between usj Mary Jeanneret 

In the Presence of us James Boone 

Ann Dutart. 

187: George Ford of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Widower, 
and Katherine Wayne of the Parish of Prince George, Spinster, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of Mr. W". Wayne of the 
Parish of Prince George, by Licence, this Sixth day of May, Anno 
Domini, 1784, by me S. F. Warren of the Parish of St. James 
Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Geo Ford 

Solemnized between usj C. Wayne 

In the Presence of us Jn°. Shackelford 

Will'". Murrav. 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES ', SANTEE 121 

188: John English of the Parish of Christ Church Widower, and 
Mary Baker of the Parish of Christ Church, Spinster were mar- 
ried in the DweUing -house of the Reverend Samuel Fenner Warren 
of this Parish, by Licence, this Twenty fourth day of June, Anno 
Domini, 1784, by me S. F. Warren of this Parish, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 John English 

Solemnized between usj Mary Baker 

In the Presence of us Sam^ Huggins 

Samuel Warren. 

189: Samuel Self of the Parish of Prince George, Bachelor & 
Anne Morrison of the Parish of Prince-George, Sp'nster, were 
married at the Plantation of M"". Robert Dan"el of the Parish of 
Prince-George, by Licence, this Twenty-second Day of July 
Anno Domini 1784, by me S. F. Warren of the Parish of St. James' 
Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Samuel Self 

Solemnized between usj Ann Morrison 

In the Presence of us Mark Huggins Jun''. 

Elias Huggins. 

190: Paul Michau of the Parish of Allsaints, Bachelor & Lydia 
Towner of the Parish of Allsaints, Widow were married at the 
Dwelling-house of Mr. Jacob Michau of the Parish of Prince 
Frederick by Licence, this Twenty fourth Day of August Anno 
Domini 1784, by me S. F. Warren of the Parish of St. Jame^' 
Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Paul Michau 

Solemnized between usj Lydia Towner 

In the Presence of us Jacob Michau 

Esther Collins 

191: Thomas Dunbar of the Parish of St. Philips Charleston, 
Bachelor, and Mary Withers of the Parish of Prince George, 
Spinster, were married at the Dwelling-house of Mrs. Elizabeth 
Withers of the Parish of Prince George, Widow, by Licence, this 
Second day of September, Anno Domini, 1784, by me, S. F. War- 
ren, of the Parish of St. James' Santee. Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 Tho\ Dunbar 

Solemnized between usj Mary Withers 

In the Presence of us Jn°. Buchanan 

Will. Withers. 



122 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

192: Rattrey Semple of this Parish, Bachelor and Mary 
Boineau of this Parish, Spinster, were married at the DweUing- 
house of Michael Boineau of this Parish, by Licence, this seventh 
Day of September, Anno Domini 1784, by me S. F. Warren of 
this Parish, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Rattrey Semple 

Solemnized between usj Mary Boineau 

In the Presence of us Michael Boineau 

William Semple 

{To he continued.) 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKE. 

(August 1778 to May 1780) 

{Continued from the April number) 

Head Quarters Stono 

June 12th 1779 
Parole, Setorius. C: S: Scipio, Saxe. 
Brigadier Colonel Mason 1 

F: O. Colonel Lytle \ for tomorrow. 

B. M. Cap'^. Hubbard J 

The Troops are to be Served with a Gill of Rum ^ man today. 

Cap". Dogharty of Col°. Armstrong's Brigade is appointed 
Brigade Major, in the place of Cap". Raiford resigned. 

The Gen', requests the Brigadier & Field Officer of the day, 
to favour him with their Company at Dinner. 

The Gen'. Court Martial of which Major Armstrong is presi- 
dent, have reported — Cap". Philip Taylor of the 5^^ N. Carolina 
regiment in arrest for the following Charges — 

1st. For behaving in a scandalous manner, unbecoming the 
Character of an Officer & Gentleman 

2dly. For leaving his Confinement when under Arrest without 
Leave. 

The Court having considered the different Charges against 
Cap". Taylor, with the Testimony of his Defence, are of Opinion 
he is guilty of behaving in a scandalous, infamous, manner, un- 
becoming the Character of an Officer & Gentleman, therefore in 
pursuance of the 21^*. Article of the 24*'^. Section of, the Articles 
of War, do sentence him to be dismissed from the Service of the 
Army of the United States of America. 

But the Court reflecting on Cap". Taylor's good Conduct & 
Behaviour as an Officer, his long Service in the Army of the United 
States & the Severity of the Sentence do recommend that he may 
be suffered to resign. 

The General hav.'ng taken into Consideration the recommenda- 
tion [here there is a page missing from the Journal]. 

123 



124 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

17th Parole C: S. 

Brigadier, Gen'. Butler '] 

F: O. L*. Col°. Scott ^ for tomorrow 

B:M: Cap°. Hubbard J 

Whenever Sick Men are sent to the Hospital, it must be certi- 
fied that they are unfit for Service, by the Surgeon or the Com- 
manding Officer of the Corps to which they belong, otherwise they 
will not be received. 
18th: Parole C:S. 

Brigadier, Gen'. Williamson 1 

Colonel Col°. Tinnin )■ for tomorrow 

B. M. Cap^. Lining J 

The Troops will be immediately supplied with a Gill of Rum ^ 
man. 

19th. Parole C: S. 

Brigadier, Colonel Armstrong 1 

F: O. Col°. Baker \ for tomorrow 

B. M. Cap". Dogharty J 

Gen'. Williamson's Brigade, while encamped in the front Line? 
is to be considered as in Gen'. Huger's Division. 

The Troops are to receive a Gill of Rum ^ man this afternoon. 

20th. Cap". Roberts requests the favour of the Ofiicers of 
the Army to attend the Funeral of his Father Colonel Roberts' 
of the Artillery at the Park at six oClock this Evening. 

The Troops are to receive a Gill of Rum ^ man this afternoon. 

Head Quarters, Stono 

^ Colonel Owen Roberts who died of wounds received at the battle of Stono, 
which took place on the morning of June 20th, and lasted about an hour. 
General Lincoln seems to have attacked without waiting for General Moultrie 
with reinforcements. (Moultrie, American Revolution, vol. i, p. 490 et. seq.) 

The contemporary records show Colonel Roberts to have been a brave and 
efficient officer. He saw continuous military service from the Cherokee War 
in 1760, when he went into service as a captain in Colonel Middleton's regiment, 
until his death; for he continued as Captain of the Provincial Artillery Company 
until the outbreak of the Revolution (Wells Register, 1774). He was a Commis- 
sioner of Fortifications in 1765 (S. C. Almanac, and Journal of Commissioners 
of Fortifications MSS.); was Church Warden for St. Andrews Parish in 1769; 
was a member of the first Provincial Congress {S. C. Gazette, Jan. 23, 1776). 
He was Major of the First Regiment of Foot (5. C. and Am. Gen. Gazette, 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAND GRIMKE 125 

21st. Parole, Liberty C. S. Lyon, Lynx. 

Brigadier, Gen^ Butler ] 

F. 0. L*. Col°. Purves > for tomorrow 

B. M. Cap". Lowry J 

Immediate Returns signed by Commanding Officers of Brigades 
& Corps, are to be made to the Aj*. Gen', specifying the Number 
of killed, wounded and missing in the Action of yesterday. 

Arms & Ammunition Returns are also to be made without Delay. 

The Officers are desired to be particularly attentive to the 
Arms of the Soldiers; they must be immediately put in the nicest 

June 16, 1775); Lieutenant-Colonel State Artillery, 14, Nov. 1775, and Colonel 
of Artillery, 16 Sept. 1776 (This Magazine, vol. 13, p. 89). 

Upon his advice, SuUivan's Island was taken possession of, and he was 
instructed to build a fort there, later known as Fort Moultrie (S. C. Hist. Soc. 
Collections, vol. 3, p. 157). The earliest record yet found of Owen Roberts 
in South Carolina, is his marriage, July 2d, 1755, with Mrs. Anne Cattell, 
widow of William Cattell, Jr. (St. Philips Register) . She was a daughter of 
John Fraser (see this Magazine, vol. 5, p. 56) and long survived Col. Roberts, 
dying in Charleston, in 1804 or 1805. (Prob. Ct. Ann Roberts of Charleston, 
widow, died intestate, W™ Cattell of Charleston, planter, administrator 19 
July, 1805). Mrs. Roberts had by her first husband W™ Cattell, Jr., two sons, 
William and Benjamin Cattell, both officers in the Continental Army. Wil- 
liam Cattell (1747-1778) married 1767 Sabinah Lynch, and died without issue. 
Benjamin Cattell d. 1782. Married 1772 Mary M'^Call of Philadelphia, and 
had issue: 1. William 1776-1842, md. MaryLadson, no issue. 2. Lydia 1773- 
1850 m. W™ Calhoun, of Baltimore, issue. 3. Ann Ferguson 1775-1847, md. 
1791 W™ Pressiman of Baltimore, issue. 4. Mary, 1778-1872, died unmarried. 
Col. Owen Roberts and his wife Ann, had one child, Richard Brooke Roberts, 
born 1757 and baptized Jan. 1st, 1758 (St. Philips Register). R. B. Roberts 
served in the Artillery regt. under his father, was captain of 3d. Artillery, 4 June, 
1777; A.D.C. to Gen. Lincoln in 1782; Captain 2d. U. S. Infantry 4. Mar. 1791; 
assigned to 2d. Sublegion, 4. Sept. 1792; Major of 3d. Sublegion, 28 Feb. 1793, 
assigned to 4th Infantry 1 Nov. 1796. He died at Burlington, N. J. Jan. 18, 
1797. (City Gazette, Feb. 10, 1797.) He married in January, 1785, Everarda- 
Catharina Sophia van Braam Houckgeest, only daughter A. E. van Braam 
Houckgeest, a Dutch gentleman, then living in Charleston {S. C. Weekly Gaz., 
Jan. 15, 1785). Richard Brooke Roberts and his wife had four children, and 
two of these, a son and a daughter, have left descendants. His widow married 
2d. in Penn. Capt. Staats Morris. "Married in June last, at the seat of A. E. 
van Braam Houckgeest, Esq. Capt. Staats Morris, of the artillery, to Mrs. 
Roberts, widow of the deceased Major Brooke Roberts of South Carolina." 
City Gazette, Sept. 7, 1798. 



126 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Order & kept so — no Soldiers to be admitted on the parade whose 
arms are exceptionable. 

All arms now loaded, the. Charges in which cannot drawn, 
are to be discharged by Regiments on their respective parades 
at two oclock this afternoon. 

22d. Parole, Montisqieu, C. S. Marquis, Marshall 

Brigadier, Gen^ Williamson^ 
F: O: Major Wise |- for tomorrow. 

B:M: Cap°. Bowie J 

All Drums & Fifes of the right Wing of the Line are to parade 
with the Guards tomorrow Morning, & after the Guards are 
march'd off, they are immediately to return to their respective 
regts. excepting such of them as are ordered on Duty for the Day. 
The next Day, the Drums & Fifes of the Left Wing are to parade 
with the Guards & so alternately from right to left until further 
Orders. 

One Gill of Rum ^ Man to be issued to the Troop this Afternoon. 
23d. Parole, Naseby, C. S. Nelson, Nash. 
Brigadier, Col°. Mason ] 

F. O. Major Armstrong } for tomorrow 

B. M. Cap'^. Hubbard J 

Pay Rolls are immediately to be made out to the first of June, 

Those Soldiers acting in the Light Infantry will be included in the 

pay Rolls of their respective Regiments 

The Army is to be immediately Supplied with a Gill of Rum 

^Man. 

24th. Parole, Othello, C. S. Order, Obey 

Brigadier, Gen^ Butler 

r Major Armstrong 1 

F. Officers \ of Gen^. Butler's 1 , ^ 

1% « • T^ • 1 J r for tomorrow 
[Major Richardson | 

B:M. Cap". Lining J 

The Troops are immediately to be compleated to 60 Rounds of 
Ammunition ^ Man, & that Quantity kept up. 

The Gen^ having been informed that much Injuiry has been 
done to Fields which have not been appraised for the public Serv- 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAND GRIMKE 



127 



ice, & those already taken being sufficient for the Horses of 
the Army — he directs that no Waggon or other Horse be turned 
into the Fields so appraised without the Waggoner or Servant 
being with them, who shall be accountable for any Mischief that 
may happen by his suffering them to go out of his Sight. 

The Troops are to be in readiness to march tomorrow Morning 
at five oclock. 

25th. Parole, Pocotaligo. C. S. Poins, Pestol. 

Br'gadier, Gen'. Wiliamson ] 

F: Officers Colonel Lyttle 

Col°. Williams 

B:M: Cap". Dogharty J 



for tomorrow 



26th. Parole Queensburg. 
Brigadier, 
F: Officers, 

B: M. 



C. S. Quire, Quill 
Colonel Mason. 
Colonel Johnston 
Col". M^'Dowell 
Major Lowry 



> for tomorrow 



27th. 



Parole. 
Brigadier, 
F. Officers 

B:M. 



C:S: 

Gen^ Butler 
Col°. Goodwin 
L*. Col°. Scott 
Cap'*. Bowie J 



for tomorrow 



In Addition to the Orderly Men now in the Hospital, a Num- 
ber will attend from each Brigade, equal to one fifth of it's sick 
& wounded. The officers of each Brigade will visit the Hospital 
daily (in rotation) & see that their patients are properly attended— 
if the number already ordered for that purpose is not sufficient 
it must be increased. 

One Cap", one Sub. two Serj*^ two CorpP. & 30 privates to 
be paraded at five oClock this Afternoon with one Days provisions 
ready cook'd The Cap", will receive Orders from the General. 

A General Court Martial to sit tomorrow Morning at Nine 
oClock for the Tryal of Lieut: Joel Lewis of the fourth N. CaroHna 
Battalion for "behaving unbecoming an Officer & a Gentleman" — 
Major Eaton will furnish the Evidence. Lieut. Col°. Lyttle 
President. 



128 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Return of Officers & Men of the So Carolina Cont^ Corps of 
Artillery killed & missing in the Action of the 20th June 1779. 
Killed 1 Colonel, 1 Gunner, 1 Matross 
Died of his wound, Matross 
Missing, 1 Matross 
Total, 5. 

{To be continued.) 



DEATH NOTICES FROM THE SOUTH CAROLINA AND 
AMERICAN GENERAL GAZETTE, AND ITS CON- 
TINUATION THE ROYAL GAZETTE. 

May 1766-June 1782. 

Compiled by Mabel L. Webber. 

{Continued from the April Number.) 

Died.] Ebenezer Simmons Esq. (Wednesday, Jan. 31, 1770.) 
Died.] Colonel Thomas Bell, much and truly lamented by all 
who knew him. — Capt. Small, lately arrived here from the West- 
Indies. — In an advanced age, Mrs. Elizabeth Guerin, Wife of Mr. 
Mathurin Guerin. (Wednesday, Feb. 7, 1770.) 

Died.] Mrs. Cassels, Wife of Mr. James Cassels. — Mrs. Guer- 
ard, Wife of David Guerard, Esq. — James Dering, Esq. — Capt. 
Thomas Courtin, of the Brigantine Polly, of Poole. (Wednesday, 
Feb. 14, 1770.) 

Died.] Lieutenant Thomas Pinckney, late of the 60th or 
Royal American Regiment, a brave and gallant Ofl&cer. He was 
in most of the Battles fought in America during the last War. 
He served at the Siege of Louisbourg, and in the successful Expe- 
dition against Martinico, at the Siege of Havana. He received 
a dangerous Wound on the Plains of Abraham, fighting against 
the French, when General Murray attacked them in order to raise 
the Siege of Quebeck. (Monday, Feb. 19, 1770.) 

Died.] WilHam Bellinger, Esq.— Rev. John Evans, Rector 
of St. Bartholomew's Parish, "greatly lamented by all his 
Parishioners." (Friday, Feb. 23, 1770.) 

Died.] Thomas Gadsden, Esq. (Friday, March 9, 1770.) 

Died.] Mr. Richard-Cochran Ashe. (Friday March 30, 1770.) 

Died.] Mrs. Claudia Inghs, Wife of Mr. George Inglis, lamented 

by all who knew her.— Stephen Mazyck, Esq.— At St. Augustine 

suddenly, Capt. Thomas Varloe of the 31st. Regiment. (April 

27, 1770.) 

Died.] Mr. Thomas Elliott— Mr. Samuel Thornton. (Fri- 
day, May 11, 1770.) 

129 



130 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Died.] At Rhode-Island, whither he lately went on Account of 
his Health, Daniel Doyley Esq; one of his Majesty's Assistant 
Judges; and Justice for this Province, — esteemed and valued 
while Hving, and now generally lamented. (Friday, May 18, 1770.) 

Died.] Mrs. Helen Laurens, Wife of Henry Laurens, Esq.; 
whose many valuable and amiable Qualities render her Death a 
heavy Loss to all she was connected or acquainted with. (Wed- 
nesday, May 23, 1770.) 

Died.] Captain Joseph Brown, late of the ship Peter &= Anne. — 
Mr. Charles Grimball, Merchant. — Mrs. Mary Thornton, Rehct 
of the late Mr. Samuel Thornton. (Friday, June 8, 1770.) 

Died.] Aged 80 years, Mrs. Anne Hume, Relict of Peter 
Hume, Esq; — Master Peter Timothy, eldest son of Mr. Peter 
Timothy. — In England, Master William Branford, only Son of 
the deceased WilHam Branford, Esq. (Friday, June 15, 1770). 

"On Tuesday were interred in St. Philip's Church-yard, the 
Remains of Jacob Motte, Esquire, Thirty years Puhlick Treasurer 
of this Province, his Corps was attended to the Grave by a very 
considerable Number of the Inhabitants, who were indeed real 
Mourners. The Character of Husband, Parent and Relation, in 
which he stood foremost, may be paralelled, but cannot be ex- 
ceeded. His publick character rendered him generally known, 
his private Virtues as universally respected. He lived in the 
constant Practice of every Christian Duty, and was a striking 
Example of that Vivacity and Chearfulness which distinguished 
the Man void of Offence. He esteemed every good Character, 
and in return was beloved by all. His Charity was distinguished 
by a prudent Application to deserving Objects. And it may with 
great Truth and Justice be said that, in him the Province has lost 
an excellent Citizen, and the Poor a most generous Benefactor." 

"On Monday the 18th Instant, was interred at St. Paul's 
Church, the Body of the once facetious Dr. James Dick, who died 
the preceeding Day, after a short Illness; his Death is much 
lamented by those who were of his particular Acquaintance, and 
regretted in general by the Inhabitants of the District in which 
he resided, being esteemed an able Surgeon and good Physician." 
(Friday, June 22, 1770.) 

A Letter from Jamaica says that Arthur Forrest, Esq: Com- 



DEATH NOTICES SO. CA. AND AM. GEN. GAZETTE 131 

mander in Chief of his Majesty's Ships on that Station, died at 
Kingston, the 29th of May last. 

From Georgia we have Advice of the Death of WilHam Graeme, 
Esq; Attorney at Law, and of Mrs. Kennan, ReHct of the late 
Henry Kennan, Esq; all formerly of this Province. (Friday, 
June 29, 1770.) 

Died.] Mr. William Baker, Merchant. (Friday July 11, 
1770.) 

Died.] In his Passage from Jamaica to this Port, Capt. Na- 
thaniel Catlin of the Sloop Beaufain. (Wednesday, July 25, 
1770.) 

Died.] In the 71st year of his Age, Isaac Mazyck, Esq.; many 
years a member of the Hon. the Commons House of Assembly 
of this Province, esteemed and valued both in his publick and 
private Character. — Ensign Gregory of his Majesty's 32d Regi- 
ment, immediately on his arrival here from Jamaica. — Mr. Na- 
thaniel Greene of Hilton-Head. — Mr. John Amory. (Friday, 
August 3, 1770.) 

Died.] Benjamin Smith, Esq; at Newport, Rhode-Island, in 
the 53d year of his age, many years Speaker of the Honourable 
the Commons House of Assembly of this Province; generous, 
humane, religious; the Love and Esteem of his Family, of his 
Friends and of the Publick in general, the blessings of the Poore, 
and that Peace of Mind which the Belief and Practice of Christian- 
ity can alone bestow, accompanied him through Life, and his 
Death was that of the righteous. 

William Wooddrop, Esq; aged 64, Many years an eminent 
Merchant here, a valuable worthy man; of unbiassed integrity, 
a steady mind and clear Judgement; when living esteemed and 
now regretted by all who knew him. 

Mr. James Dishington, Surgeon, a young man lately entered 
into Business, of an amiable Disposition, modest and engaging 
in his Behavior, and skilled in his Profession. (Monday, August 
13, 1770.) 

Died.] Mrs. Anne Gibbes, Relict of the late Col. John Gibbes. 
— Mr. John Dodd. — Mr. Farquhar MacGillivray. (Monday, 
August 20, 1770) 

Died.] In the 66th year of his Age, Mr. William Carwithen, 



132 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Librarian of the Charles Town Library Society. (Monday, 
September 3, 1770.) 

Died.] In an advanced age, Mrs. Ruth Pinckney, Relict of 
William Pinckney, Esq. — Mrs. Anne Cole, Wife of Mr. Richard 
Cole. — Miss Elizabeth Moore, Daughter of John Moore Esq., 
of St. Thomas's Parish. (Monday, Sept. 17, 1770.) 

Died.] Mr. William Williamson, Factor. — Mr. John Law. 
(Monday, Sept. 20, 1770.) 

Died.] Mr. Maurice Jones, Merchant; esteemed by all who 
knew him. (Tuesday, October 9, 1770.) 

Died.] Mrs. Elizabeth Lamboll, Wife of Thomas LamboU, 
Esq. — Mrs. Katherine Moody, Relict of Mr. Joseph Moody. — 
Mr. Samuel Lord, Brother of Mr. Andrew Lord. — Mr. Stephen 
Bedon. 

"On Wednesday the 17th instant were interred in the Family 
Burying-Ground in St. Andrew's Parish, the Remains of Mrs. 
Margaret Cattell, the amiable Consort of John Cattell, Esq; 
her surviving Husband, who bewails a virtuous and affectionate 
Wife. The Blessings and Lamentations of the Orphans she gen- 
erously relieved and protected, attended her to the grave. Her 
distressed Neighbours have lost a generous Benefactress, and her 
Friends the Conversation of a chearful, lively, and religious 
Acquaintance." 

"On Sunday the 21 instant, after a painful and tedious Illness, 
died Mr. John-Lloyd Waring, a Youth whose Death, from his many 
good Quahties, is justly lamented by his Friends and Acquaint- 
ances." (Tuesday, October 23, 1770.) 

Died.] Mrs. Anne Lambton, Wife of Richard Lambton, Esq. — 
Mrs Anna Regina Smiser, Wife of Mr. Smiser. (Tuesday, Novem- 
ber 6, 1770.) 

Died.] In the 69th year of her age, Mrs. Jane Boone, Relict 
of William Boone, Esq. — Mr. Johnston Rainey. — In England, 
Capt. John Chamberling, of the Ship Queen Charlotte, in this 
Trade. (Tuesday, November 13, 1770.) 

Died.] Mr. John Braund. — At Rhode Island, Charles Oding 
sell. Esq; of Georgia, formerly of this Province. (Tuesday, 
November 20, 1770.) 

Died.] Mrs. Coram, Wife of Mr. John Coram. (Tuesday, 
November 27, 1770.) 



DEATH NOTICES SO. CA. AND AM. GEN. GAZETTE 133 

Died.] After a long and tedious illness, which she bore with 
truly Christian Patience and Resignation, Mrs. Anne Lowndes, 
Wife of the Honourable Rawlins Lowndes, Esquire. (Wednesday, 
December 19, 1770.) 

{To he continued.) 



HISTORICAL NOTES. 

WILL OF COL. JOHN GODFREY. 

In the last number of this magazine (page 57) in the article 
of Hon. H. A. M. Smith upon "Old Charles Town and its Vicinity," 
mention is made of the will of Capt. John Godfrey, the son of 
Col. John Godfrey. We now publish in full the will of Col. John 
Godfrey. (So. Ca. Hist. Commission Records of the Governor and 
Ordinary, 1672-1692, page 430). 

He was one of the most capable and vigorous men of the early 
days of the colony, and a very successful soldier (Collections of 
South Carolina Historical Society, vol. 5, page 229, note). Through 
his daughter Mary the wife of Dr. Henry Woodward his descend- 
ants for many generations have been among the most distinguished 
men of the Colony and State of South Carolina. (See Article 
"Some of the Descendants of Dr. Henry Woodward, the First 
English Settler, S. C. Historical Magazine, vol. 8, page 29). 

The will was drawn evidently by himself and he being thus, as 
the lawyers say, inops consilii, it is not so logical and well expressed 
as it might be. His wife's will is recorded in the Probate Court 
of Charleston County, Book 1694-1707, page 132. She survived 
him. 

Carolina. First John Godfrey Senr. of this Province being at 
psent something ill but in his pfect memory for ye: which I give 
the Lord praise & knowing man must have a change but when 
and where he knows not, Have thought it Convenient to settle his 
affairs, and to wait one ye Lord untill my Change Comes, or when 
his good pleasure shall Come to Call my soule, I Committ unto my 
blessed Saviour, being Assured by his pretious Blood And Mediation 
to receive etternall happyness and Joyes in ve world to come, And 
for what worldly Estate yt it hath pleased god to Indue me wth 
all, I doe hereby give and bequeth in Manner and forme ffollowing, 
as to the Interment of my body, I Leave to be buried as my 
Executrix shall see Convenient provided it doth not exceed Twenty 
Pounds, Imprimus first I doe make and ordaine my ever Deare 
and Loveing Wife my whole and Sole Executrix Leaving and 

134 



HISTORICAL NOTES 135 

bequeathing unto her my Whole estate reall & Personall except 
what is hereafter excepted, And Dureing her Naturall Life One 
* * * * My Will is yt I would have all my Slaves Negroes 
and Indians, Keepe Intire for the proper use of my children & to be 
Delivered unto them after my wives Decease, to Every one Accord- 
ing as I have appointed & Nominated in this Instrument of Wright 
ing here inclosed and Sealed, wch I doe Order not to be opened 
nor Declared untill ye Decease of my wife, and for the conditions 
aforementioned, I Desire yt security be given, yt Noe Embessle- 
ment may or shall be made, untill it shall Come: into ye hands 
of my Children, my meaning is the estate bound over, unto my 
over-Seers in Trust, by my wife to perform the same, who are 
here Nommated Requested and by me Appointed, and hopeing 
they will except and performe the same (who are my beloved 
son Capn John Godfrey, whome I hope he will in all Just things: 
be a True Assistant unto his mother) alsoe Capn: Henry Symons 
& mr. Henry Sam ways to assist if any occasion be: unto the sd 
Two last, I give and bequeath unto each of them, A Beaver hatt 
to Receive the same within Six months affter my Decease, but 
if please god my wife should alter her condition by Marriage 
then my Will is that the Instrument of wrighting Above sealed 
shall be oppened Published and Declared, and my wife Mary 
Godfrey as now is to stand unto ye Thirds (as ye Law in yt Case 
has provided for) and Dureing this naturall Life of hers, and 
after my wives Decease, all things to be, as is Appointed in ye 
Abovesaid Wrighting, and for what other estate it hath pleased 
god, to Endue me wth, all my Debts & funerall Charges being 
Disbursed for which Debts I doe leave in yt hands of Benjamin 
Ball Gentleman in ye Island of Barbados Two Hundred and odd 
pounds Ster. wch will Comply and pay farr more than I doe or 
cann owe, wch Said Money is by Judgements & when what is just 
is paid & satsified I wood have the Remainder of it Laid out & 
put in a Generall stock & Devided Among my Children Accord- 
ing unto ye Purposs & Meaning I have ordered in my foregoing 
will And these I doe give and Bequeath unto my beloved son 
Capn Jno Godfrey, to receive & Enjoy Imediatly after my Death, 
my silver handled sword and gould wrought Belt, my gould 
Seal ring my Silver headed Cane, my Black Silke sute, & White 
Beavor, my best ffuzee & all my Law Bookes, Together wth 



136 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

four good Sermon Bookes, my black Silke Stockings, and Two 
pair of Black Spanish Leather Shoes, Besides what will follow 
after ye Decease of his Mother And unto my son Richd Godfrey 
I doe to him give and bequeath in the full of all his Portion for 
him to enjoy Emediatly after my Death Except what hereafter 
shall be Excepted (viz my gould Ring wch I had at ye ffunerall 
of Sr. Jno. Yeamans Agget Handled Sword And next Best Belt, 
and all my Mathamaticall Bookes and Instruments, Together 
wth the plantation, which I purchased from James Sheppard; 
And John Chaplin whereon Alexander Gierke doth Now Live wth 
all ye household goods & all ye Neat Gattle & hoggs Thereon 
belonging to me, provided that if he doth Depart this Life Before 
he hath Lawfull Issue, yt then ye said Land and my Parte of 
Gatle, wch I doe here give him Returne into our owne family, 
which shall be at his pleasure if he make any will otherwayes 
at the Dispoesall of my Executrix, & overseers, or as Maney of 
them as shall be in Being — And for my son Benjamen Godfrey 
I doe give and Bequeath unto him in manner and forme following 
(Vizt.) my Blacke Sword and Buff Belt my Left handed Gun, 
one small gould ring. My Broad Gloath Coate, and Briches, Be- 
longing to the same, my Black Beavor and one pair of silke stock- 
ings and Two pair of Black Spanish Leather Shoes Besides what will 
follow after ye Decease of his mother but these Imediatly after 
my Decease — And as for my Daughter Mary since hath pleased 
god to provide soee well for her wch I hope he will Continue his 
Blessings to her I doe give and Bequeath unto her, in Manner 
and forme ffollowing (Vizt) one small gould ring, one Sett of gould 
Buckles, four Younge Cowes, and younge Mare, or younge Horse, 
and unto her Husband Lt: William Davis, My fuzee wth the Brass 
Barrrill, and And for what else Shee Must have patience untill ye 
Decease of her Mother &c,: I give and Bequeath to all my grand 
Children Now Liveing to be Equally Parted among them one and 
twenty Heifers, and fourteen Ewe Lambs to say two ap peice, 
to mary Browne my black Mares Last Coult And each of them 
a Horse or Mare, when they shall obtain unto ye age of Twelve 
yeares, each child, and unto my grandson John Woodward, I doe 
give & bequeath my physicall Bookes, or as many of them as his 
grandmother shall think fitt, my True meaning is, yt what I have 
given as Catle and lambs unto my grandchildren, they are to 



HISTORICAL NOTES 137 

receive and enjoy or their parents for them, wch in one yeare & 
one day affter my decease, and furthermore, I give unto my Daugh- 
ter mary Davis, that a full Balance be had and made of her Two 
former Husbands Debts, Robert Browne and Doctr Henry Wood- 
ward, which did any wayes attaine to me, provided my acccount 
is to be fully Ballanced alsoe, that noe further trouble may any 
wayes arise or acrue, and unto my Beloved wife Mary Godfrey, 
I doe give the Ball faced mare and what Increase shee shall have 
after my decease, together with one Indian boy by name Ishmaell, 
and Twenty ews & a Ram for her to dispose to whom shee shall 
think good, one to bestow or give. To my son John Godfrey, I 
give all the land & houseing whereon I now Live, to him & his 
heires forever, after my wives Decease, To my son Benjamin 
my Plantation I bought of John Chaplin & his wife, on ye North 
side of Stoanoe river to him & his heires for ever And to my Daugh- 
ter Mary Davis five hundred Acres of Land Near Shembee, and 
to her heires males for ever, to Mary Brown the halfe of Hobca 
point, and forty acres adjoining unto it, being on ye South side 
of ye said Land, To John Godfrey the son of Capn John Godfrey 
one hundred Acres I purchased from Henry Blanchard, wch was 
John Bullins According to plat and grant on the south side of 
Stonoe River, to him and his heires for ever. And further to streight- 
en and to make all men satisfaction for feare moneys should not 
Come in, and paid According to Expectation, I do leave the Leather 
And Effects of my Town House, and the Leather wch I doe value 
at one hundred pound sterHng and if anything should be wanting, 
it must be Compleated, wth out of my Estate, And as for one 
Negroe man by name Samson which I bought from Capn Roi)ert 
Daniell Cost me Twenty five Pounds Sterlling I do leave to pay 
Twenty pounds I Borrowed from my Daughter Davis, wch was of 
the Children of Doctr Henry Woodwards Estate &c And this I 
doe publish to be my Last will and Testament Renouncing all 
former wills whatsoever by me or my Meanes Made, In Witness 
hereof I have hereunto Subscribed my hand and fixed my scale 
this Twelfth day of March Anno Domini one Thousand Six hun- 
dred eighty nine or ninety, and haveing omited some small matter 
wch I doe hereby ordaine and Confirm to my negroe man Jugg 
Sambo, I doe order he shall have one good Cow given unto him 
within one month after my decease wittness my hand as before 



138 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

written, the six Interlines Marked wth a hand I doe allow of 
to be my Act and Deed. 

John Godfrey (Seale). 
Signed, sealed & Delivered in the 
presence of us * * * * 

And be it further remembered that I further declare as my 
will that one parcell of Land, About Twenty Acres by the highway 
that Leads into Country adjoineing unto mr. Barnard Schenck- 
ings and one Close I have in Towne Adjoineing unto Mr. Thomas 
Smiths wch Land, I purchased from mr mathew English, Accord- 
ing to his bill of sale under his hand and seale Recorded in mr John 
Berrisfords office, all wch I leave to be disposed of, as my Exe- 
cutrix and overseers shall think fitt Towards payment of my 
Just Debts this with ye Confirmation of what is before written 
in my will. Witness my hand and seale the day and yeare within 
written. 

John Godfrey (Seale) 
Signed, Sealed and Delivered in the presence of us 

Thomas ffawcett 
the marke X of Henry Leist 
George ff rancklin 



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THE 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 

MAGAZINE 




PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY THE 

SOUTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



VOLUME XVI, No. 4 



OCTOBER, 191 5 



Entered at the Post-office at Charleston, S. C, as 
Second-Class Matter 



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE. 

Joseph W. BarnvvELl, Henry A. M. Smith, 

A. S. Salley, Jr. 

EDITOR OF THE MAGAZINE. 
Mabel L. Webber. 



CONTENTS 

Letters to General Greene and Others 139 

The Trenhohn Family 151 

Parish Register of St. James', Santee 164 

Order Book of John Faucheraud Grimke 178 

Death Notices from the Soath Carolina and American 
General Gazette, and its Continuation the Royal Gazette , 184 

Index 189 



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please notify the Secretary and Treasurer. 

Miss Mabel L. Webber, 

South Carolina Historical Society, 

Charleston, S. C. 



The South Carolina 

Historical and Genealogical 

Magazine 

VOL. XVI OCTOBER, 1915 No. 4 



LETTERS TO GENERAL GREENE AND OTHERS 

(Continued from the July number) 
Annotated by Joseph W. Barnwell 

[jOHN LAURENS TO GEN. GREENE]^ 

Dear General, 

I yesterday had a satisfactory view of the Enemy's encamp- 
ment on John's Island, and am inclined from its appearance to 
believe that their numbers do not exceed four hundred — accurate 
intelligence however on this head is expected every moment — 
they are posted with their rear to the river, their right supported 
by Gibbes' house, their left by a little skirt of wood and it is said 
they have the ditch and bank of an old inclosure, in front — beyond 
the main road and the extent of about half a mile of clear ground. 

iThis letter refers to a proposed attack upon the British forces on Johns 
Island undertaken by Col. John Laurens and Col. Henry Lee ("Light Horse 
Harry") just before the meeting of the Legislature in 1782, generally known 
as the " Jacksonborough Assembly." It failed because one of the columns, 
commanded by Maj. James Hamilton of the Pennsylvania Line, lost its way 
owing to the darkness of the night and the desertion of its guide and no attack 
could be made. Maj. Hamilton was the father of Gov. James Hamilton of 
Nullification fame. He married a daughter of Thomas Lynch, Sr. and remained 
in South Carolina. The letter settles a controversy as to the true date of the ex- 
pedition. Lee in his Memoirs (vol. 2, page 392) said December 21, 1781 ; Judge 
Johnson in his Life of Greene (vol. 2, page 279) said December 13, 1781; Lee's 

139 



140 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Col. Lee and myself in consequence of the permission which 
you have been pleased to give us, have determined upon the enter- 
prise — and make a preliminary move to-day, his command to 
Somer's and mine to Skirvins. I am in great hopes we shall be 
able to cross a detachment of Cavalry by swimming which will be 
infinitely useful to us — We are both of opinion that in order to 
guard against accidents, it will be advisable to arrive with your 
Army at the fording place at daylight on the morning of our cross- 
ing which we have fixed for Sunday next — if your support sh*^. be 
necessary — the consequences of reinforcements on both sides can 
only terminate in a general action, in which it appears to me that 
we shall have great advantage on ours — and to say the least of this 
disposition, I think it will exclude the possibihty of any serious 
misfortune to us — any demonstrations that you sh*^. think proper 
to make towards Dorchester, by having a camp & Quarters marked, 
might serve to divide the Enemy's attention from the real object — 
your appearance there in person which w**. be speedily reported in 
town w^. be most likely to produce the desired effect — and you 
might easily overtake the troops afterwards on their march — 

I am Dear General 

Yours most affectionately 
John Laurens. 
Shubricks 

11*^. Jany. 1782. 
Endorsed: 
From Col". Laurens 

Jany. nth 1782. 



son, Henry Lee in his Campaign oj 1781 in the Carolinas (page 502) attacked 
the accuracy of Johnson by showing that letters of General Greene dated De- 
cember 21, and 28, 1781, referred to the expedition as not yet having started. 
McCrady (South Carolina in the Revolutionary War, 1781-1783, page 505) 
mentions the controversy and decides in favor of Judge Johnson. This letter 
now shows that it was in January, 1782, not in December, 1781, that the at- 
tack was attempted. January 13, 1782, fell on Sunday. An unpublished 
letter in existence dated January 28, 1782, from Edward Rutledge to Arthur 
Middleton confirms this letter. It says: "about ten or twelve days ago Genl. 
Greene detached a part of his army to surprise the Post on Johns Island, but 
thro' the darkness of the night, the corps separated & were obliged to lay 
aside the scheme." 



LETTERS TO GENERAL GREENE AND OTHERS 141 

[THOMAS PINCKNEY TO GEN. GREENE] 

Addressed: 

The Hon^'« Major General Green 
Commanding the Army of the 
United States in the 
Southern Department. 

Fairfield Santee March 31«* 1782 
Sir— 

I had the honor of addressing a Line to you on Thursday Morning 
last to inform you that M^ Pendleton^ & Maj"". Hyme^ had been 
captured & carried off by a Party of British Dragoons the preceed- 
ing morning, and that I had been left by them on Condition of 
obeying their Summons to deliver myself up if on their return to 
Town they should find I had been previously exchanged.^ This 
letter was intercepted by a British Party about 12 Miles from 
hence & tho' I know of nothing exceptionable in it they thought 
proper to destroy it & detain my servant: I have now therefore to 
repeat a Request which I made in it that you would be pleased 
to transmit to me an authentic Certificate that I was not ex- 
changed on Friday last, or at least that no Certificate of my ex- 
change had been received at Head Quarters or by the Commissary 
of Prisoners previous to that Day. 

I have no doubt, Sir, that you will take such measures to pro- 
cure the enlargement of the Gentlemen who have been made 
Prisoners as the Public Service & their particular situation (being 
in a bad state of Health) may require. 

'^ Judge Henry Pendleton after whom the old Pendleton District (now 
Pickens, Oconee and Anderson Counties) was named. 

^ Maj. Edward Hyme, aide to General Greene. He was Commissary of Pris- 
oners. An unpublished letter of Edward Rutledge to Arthur Middleton dated 
April 14, 1782, says: "I am sorry to tell you poor Pendleton as he was going 
Circuit a few days ago was taken prisoner and is in the Provost; Hyrne was 
also taken but met with very different treatment. He was treated with all 
possible civility and permitted to come out immediately on his parole." 

* Maj. Thomas Pinckney was captured at Camden in August, 1780, and his 
leg was very badly broken. It was supposed that he had been exchanged in 
1781. {Life of Gen. Thomas Pinckney, by Rev. C. C. Pinckney, page 82). 
Heitman indeed says December, 1780, but this letter seems to show that he 
had not been exchanged in March, 1782. 



142 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

M"". and Miss Motte^ at whose House M'. Pendleton was taken, 
were much insulted & plunder'd by the Party who went there. 
At M'. D. Horry's® where Major Hyrne & I were taken Major 
Frazer who commanded & the other officers, behaved with Polite- 
ness & made the Dragoons deliver up part of their Plunder & 
promised to procure the rest when more at leisure. 

I am desired to render Compliments of Congratulations on the 
safe arrival of M''^. Green from the Families at M". Motte' & 
M'. D. Horrys remain with sentiments of respectful esteem. 

Sir 

Your most obliged & obedient Serv*. 
Thomas Pinckney 
Maj'. 1"*. Cont^. Reg*. S. C. 
Maj'. Gen'. Greene. 

Endorsed: 
From Major Pinckney. March 3P*. 1782. 

[jOHN LAURENS TO GENERAL GREENE] 

Addressed: 

the honble 

General Greene. 
Dear General 

If you will be pleased to order the select detachment to join 
this evening at the Cross Roads leading to New Dorchester — I 
am in hopes we shall be able to effect our intended passage and 
march — the men must have provisions cooked for tomorrow to be 
upon a par with us — if Major Eggleston can be ordered on the 
command with picked men it will facilitate our operations greatly. 

No news from town, except that they kept themselves sober yes- 
terday'' — apprehensive that you might otherwise take advantage of 
their festivity— confirm the capture of Providence on the 10*'' 
May — 

D'. General Yours 
John Laurens 

^ Rebecca Motte, of " the Indian Arrows" story, widow of Jacob Motte and 
daughter of Robert Brewton. "Miss Motte" was Mary Motte afterwards 
wife of Wilh'am Alston. 

* Daniel Horry married Harriott, the only sister of Thomas Pinckney. 



LETTERS TO GENERAL GREENE AND OTHERS 143 

5th June. 

As I understand there is Rum in Store I will take the hberty of 
issuing my Cormny. with returns for 1 gill ^ man for the whole — 
relying upon your indulgence in granting an order for it. 

Endorsed: 
From Lt. Col. Laurens 
June S^^ 1782. 

[mrs. elizebeth sinkler; to gen. greene] 

Addressed: 

The Hon"^ Maj'. Gen*. Greene 
hon"^. by 

Capt. Zeigler. 

Sir, 

The Care of a considerable Family & Estate devolved on me by 
the Death of M^ Sinkler, who has fallen a victim in the present 
unhappy War, lays me under the necessity of making the present 
Application to you. 

I know it to be the Duty of all to contribute as far as in their 
Power to the pubHc assistance & perhaps the Supplies from few 
Estates in this Country have been greater than what have been 
furnished from this. The Quantity of Indigo taken one Way or 
another, has been forty Barrels; and upwards of six thousand 
Bushels of Provisions have been delivered for the use of the State 
since November last. Upon a late Occasion the provisions re- 
maining were calculated by the Officers sent and the adjudged 
Surplus imprest for public Exigencies. Not content with this, 
another Forage Master by name Kelly has now thought proper to 
break open my Barn & take thereout five Waggon Loads more of 
the provisions assigned for plantation use. 

I have therefore Reason to fear without your Interference by 
issuing positive Orders to the contrary or by other prohibitory 

^"Yesterday" was June 4 and the birthday of King George III, upon 
which no good Briton was expected to be sober. 

«Mrs. Sinkler was the widow of Peter Sinkler of "Lifeland" Plantation, 
St. Stephen's Parish, and daughter of Charles Cantey; (This Magazine, yo\. 
xi, page 237) . Peter Sinkler was a planter of large means and a staunch patriot. 
He died of typhus fever contracted as a prisoner in the old Post Office at Charles- 
ton. The plantation had been raided by the British {DuBose, Reminiscences 
of St. Stephen's Parish, Thomas' edition, page 47). 



144 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Methods which you may judge most effectual, that your Forage 
Masters induced by the Convenience of the place may occasion 
two hundred or more Lives to be left to perish whilst other plan- 
tations in the Neighborhood of only more difficult access have 
large Quantities of Provisions to spare & are unresorted to by 
them. 

I am, 

Sir with due Respect 

Your most obedient 

Eliz. Sinkler 
Santee 11^. June 1782. 
The hon**'*. Maj'. Gen'. Greene. 
indorsed,: 
From M"^. Sinkler 
June 25th '82. 

[HUGH RUTLEDGE^ TO GEN. GREENE] 

Addressed: 

The Honorable 

Major General Greene. 
Dear Sir — 

There are now in the Port of George Town several vessels that 
have been taken from the Enemy & which can not be condemned 
or their cargoes disposed of unless I go there for that Purpose but 
as the Road thither is by no means safe I am constrained to re- 
quest the Favor of an Escort from you (if you can spare one about 
Tuesday next) to accompany me so far that I may be out of the 
Enemies reach. 
I am D'. Sir with the great respect and Esteem 

Y'. most obed*. Serv*. 
Hugh Rutledge. 
Endorsed: June 29, 1782 

From M'. Hugh Rutledge 
June 29th '82 

Judge of the Admiralty of S. C. 

'Hugh Rutledge, a brother of John Rutledge, had been Speaker of the 
Jacksonborough House of Representatives, afterwards Chancellor of the Court 
of Equity. 



LETTERS TO GENERAL GREENE AND OTHERS 145 

[tHOMAS MAYERS'" TO GEN. GREENE] 

Addressed: 

To his Excellency 
Major General Green 
Excellent Sir. 

I beg leave to inform you that I was in my Countrys Service 
with Gen'. Marion and on the 25*'', of February last we were 
surprised by a parcel of the British Horse at M". Stedimans on 
Santee when and where It was my bad fortune to be taken Pris- 
oner by them, and Ever Since Confined to a Close prison Ship 
which has caused me greatly to lose my Health. And under- 
standing that my Brother Joseph Mayers is Prisoner to you and 
hearing no likelihood of an Exchange for the whole of us, I Humbly 
Pray that your Honour would Exchange my Brother for me if he 
is so attach'd to the British or if your Honour shall find to the 
Contrary and would Please to Exchange some other Prisoner for 
me I should always think nothing that I could do for your Honor 
to much for me to do. As it would release me out of my Confine- 
ment that I might avenge myself of wrongs done me by my Ene- 
mies and that I might be of Assistance to my Family that have 
Greatly suffered whilst I have been absent from them. 

I am Your Honours 
July the 10th Day 1782. most obed' & very Hum^ Ser*. 

Thomas Mayers 
Endorsed: 
From M'. Thomas Mayers 

July 10th 1782. 

[gov. JOHN RUTLEDGE TO GEN. GREENe]" 

Addressed: 

The Honble Major General Greene — 

M". Mottes Thur^^y. Momg. 
D'. Sir 

I arrived, Yesterday, at this place, about three Hours after you 
left it, & am sorry, that I did not come in time to have the pleasure 
of meeting you. 

^^ There was a very respectable family of this name in South Carolina at 
this time, but there is nothing to show that the writer of this letter was one of 
its members. 

"An important letter in one particular at least. "Harden" to whom it 



146 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

I wish you w'^. send up 6 or 7 of the Militia Horse or State 
Troops, for the purpose of carrying any dispatches which I may 
have occasion to send, about the country — I am told Hardens 
Regiment, & the two other Southward Regiments, formerly Gar- 
dens & Hugers, contain about 800 men who might be brought into 
Service, but. Harden, who is a very worthy brave Man, keeps up 
no discipline or Authority over them — he just lets 'em do as they 
please — would it not be well to order Pickens, to draw off 
some (about 300 of 'em) & either keep 'em in the Field with 
you, or, put 'em with Marion, who w'^. manage 'em much better 
than Harden did, or ever will — and prevent them going into the 
Enemy, as Several, (who I really did not expect would do so,) of 
Hardens Men have lately done. I understand that if those 
Regiments had done their Duty, Marion would have made the 
late affair w**' Major Fraser a very compleat one — I propose 
staying here, until I hear from you, where you w^. recommend 
that I sh*^. remain — I wish to be nearer to you, but, in the present 
state of things, & untill I hear from you, I think I can*, take up 
my Abode so well any where as here — I shall expect the pleasure 
of a Line from you, whenever any thing material occurs, & Leisure 
will admit of your writing. 

I am with the greatest Esteem & Regard 

D'Sir 

Y. most obd. Serv*. 
Gen. Greene. J: Rutledge. 

Endorsed: 
From Gov'. Rutledge 

6th Sep'. 1782. 



refers was Col. William Harden, a very brave and energetic officer, who did a 
great deal to keep alive the spirit of the Patriots in the country between the 
Cooper River and the Savannah. When a Brigadier General was appointed 
for this district, it was thought by some (Johnson's Life of Greene), that 
Harden should not have been passed over. If, however, Governor Rutledge 
had the opinion which he expresses in this letter of the failure to enforce disci- 
pline on the part of Harden, it assigns reasons which have never before come 
to light. 



letters to general greene and others 147 

[count kosciuszko to gen. greene] 
Addressed: 

The Honorable Major 
General Greene. 
Sir 

The British pay'd me great honor today in the afternoon they 
parad all guards that are at Works in the whole Island and 
stayed till they lost the wue of me they fir'd Alarm Gun with 
the Shot wich very near it was to heat one Gentilman who was 
with me — at the landing I saw two boats Going to Town inter- 
mist with two Small Shloops, wich were loaded some with the 
British and some with different persons but stop'd at my aproch, 
On the Shore was great many men, and more british than the 
others higher up at the Bloff upon the right of the Hessien Re- 
doubt I saw nine small vessels with about the same number of 
Boats, on the Shore was about twenty Barels and some Baggage 
After the Gun fire as the men were paraded, I saw two Officers 
Galoping from one Work to the other and immediately the num- 
ber of Men that were paraded diminished Considerably I saw 
going by smal partys after back ward forward till I left the place 
by this manuevre of the Ennemys I think they have in vue to 
Evacuat the Island this night if I am not mistaken as the men 
had their Napsaks very heavy loaded every one I saw at the 
dock the boats were Coming from the Town very fast I counted 
Six that I could distinguish upon the river, in Side of the Island 
I could see but few men I send you a letter from the Gentilman 
that came with the Flag which he begs for an Answer 

I am Sir with perfect 

respect your most Humble 
and most obe*. Servant 
Thad. Kosciuszko^^ 
3'^ Octob. 

Endorsed: 
From Col°. Kosciuszko. 

October 3, 1782 

■-Appointed Engineer in the Service of the United States with rank of 
Colonel, by Congress October 18, 1776 (Journals Continental Congress, vol. 6, 
page 888), and Brevet Brigadier-General October 13, 1783 (Heitman, page 254); 
served with Greene on his Southern Campaign. 



148 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

[CHARLES COTESWORTH PINCKNEY TO GENERAL GREENe] 

Ashley River Oct : 2 1 , 1 782 . 
Dear General, 

Agreeable to your desire I enclose you my opinion on the Ques- 
tions proposed to the Council of officers, and I have assigned my 
reasons pretty much at large out of respect due to the sentiments 
of Gentlemen, whose characters I highly regard, but from whose 
opinion in the present Instance it is my misfortune to dissent, and 
in order to convince you, and those before whom the proceedings 
of the Council may be laid, that I do not differ out of an ob- 
stinate captiousness, and on light grounds, but for reasons which 
appear to me weighty and important. Be assured I remain with 
unfeigned regard & esteem. 

Your most Obed*. H'ble. Serv*, 

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney. 
General Greene. 
Endorsed: 
From Col". Pinckney 
Oct. 21"*. 1782. 

[lACHLAN MCINTOSH TO GEN. GREENe] 

Addressed: 
Honbi. 

Major General Greene 

Commanding the Southern Army. 
Headquarters 
S°. CaroHna 

Favored by 1 

Doctor Houstown j 

Dear General 

When I came down to Savannah I was happy to be informed 
by Governor Martin of our State, that he & Gov. Tonyn of 
East Florida had agreed to discountenance, and as far as in their 
power to put a stop to all plundering for the future, beyond their 
respective Limits — which has grown to such a Higth, by a Law- 
less, Savage and unprincipled Banditti, that no Man is Safe one 



LETTERS TO GENERAL GREENE AND OTHERS 149 

Night in His House in any part of this State travelling a Mile 
upon the Roads, or even in the Town of Savannah, and has been 
a great injury & disgrace to the general Cause, and nearly de- 
populated & ruined this fine Country — but I am apt to think an 
affair which happened some days past, & raised a general Clamour 
& Resentment here, will break this agreement off, unless a timely 
remedy is apply'd. 

One Andrew D'veaux late of S**. Carohna it is said, has fitted 
out some Armed Boats in Charlestons — came inland with them 
from East Florida, plundering Plantations in his way along, & 
among others, took a Boat Seven Negroes & some Household Furni- 
ture belonging to my Brother Col°. W™. Mcintosh, and afterwards 
landed at Beveley [?], twelve Miles from Savannah & carryed 
off thirty negroes & some other effects belonging to M". Morrel. — 
our Governor has wrote to Gov. Tonjm by a flagg upon the Oc- 
casion to have them Restored, in case they are gone to Augustine 
— but it is thought as this Deveaux is Commishioned from Charles- 
town, that he will pay no regard to the authority of Gov'. Tonyn — 
and in that case that an appreciation from you to Gen^ Lesley 
upon the subject will be necessary, and if you think there is no 
impropriety in it, I am desired to Request that you will do it. 

I have the Honor to be with the greatest Respect Dear General 

Your most Ob*. Hb'. Serv*, 

Lach". Mcintosh" 
Savannah 30th October 1782 
Hon'*. 

Major General Green. 

P. S. I begg leave to introduce the bearer James Houstown of 
this State, to your acquaintance, he is one of the Surgeons General 
to the Southern Army, is a prisoner on parole since the Capture of 
Charlestown, and very anxious to be Exchanged if possible. 

Endorsed: 
From Col". Mcintosh 

Oct'. 30*'^. '82. 

"Lachlan Mcintosh, the son of John Mor Mcintosh, a Scotchman who 
came over to Georgia with Oglethorpe. He was said to have been in Charles- 
ton in his youth in a business connection with the Laurens family. He was 
a steady patriot during the Revolution and was a Brigadier General in the 
Continental Army. 



150 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

[The letter from General Sumter to General Greene dated 
January 29, 1781, published in the last issue of this Magazine, 
page 97, is in reply to the letter of General Greene to him of 
Jannary 8, 15 and 19, 1781, printed in the Charleston Year Book 
of 1899 (Appendix, page 79). It fills an important gap in the 
correspondence of the two oflScers for it shows that Sumter was 
irritated by expressions in the letters of General Greene, and 
considered them as criticising his course. No charge of insin- 
cerity on the part of General Greene because he criticised Sum- 
ter in his letters to others and not in those to him can therefore 
fairly be made up to this time for his letters to Sumter were evi- 
dently considered by Sumter himself as criticisms of his course.] 

{To be continued.) 



THE TRENHOLM FAMILY 

Compiled by Henry Schulz Holmes 

William Trenholme was a native of Allerston, Yorkshire, Eng- 
land. He was born there (the only child of his parents), in 1737, 
and married Ann Esther Lookuph, bom in 1741, in Durham. 
They came to America in 1764, going first to New York and then 
to Charleston, South Carolina. He remained there until the 
revolutionary spirit began to be serious, when being an ardent 
loyalist, he carried his family to New York, thence to Holland, and 
thence to St. Domingo, from which place they returned in 1793, 
at the time of the revolution there, to Charleston, where they 
passed the remainder of their lives, Mr. Trenholme dying in 
March 1822. He was of St. Phillip's parish, and was buried^ in the 
churchyard of St. PhiUips. Mrs. Trenholme was of the Roman 
Cathohc faith and was buried in the churchyard of St. Mary's, 
Hasell Street. (An addition to that church building extends 
over the graves of Mrs. Trenholme and others.) 

No. 1 

WILLIAM TRENHOLME 

Born at Allerston. Yorkshire England Feb. 1737 died at Charles- 
ton. 28. Feb. 18222 married Ann Esther Lookuph. born 1741. at 
Durham, Engld. 

1 An entry in the Registerof St. Phillip's Church, is thus: William Trenhohn, 
aged 85 yrs 28 Feb. 1822. Services by A. Gibbes. Three old Ladies, the last 
of the Trenhohne family in England died in 1870 and London Solicitors, Head 
& Hill, 3 Raymond Buildings, Grays Inn, advertised in the Charleston News and 
Courier, for information concerning George Alfred Trenholme, Arsent Louise 
Trenholme and Esther Barron, heirs to the Estate. Gen. Wihnot G. de 
Saussure proved the claim and in accordance with family agreement, the es- 
tate was obtained by Miss Esther Barron and Miss Catherine Robertson, 
Grand daughters of William Trenholme. 

2 On 28*^^ Ulto in the 85*'' year of his age, William Trenhohn, [Mr.T. dropped 
the final e from his name] of North Allerton, [Allerston] in the Kingdom of 
England. 

Many years a respectable Merchant of New York, and for the last 37 years 
of this City. 

He died sincerely regretted by his numerous offspring. {The Courier, 
Charleston, S. C, 4 Mar., 1822.) 

151 



152 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

ISSUE 

I Esther, m. John Barron. Issue. 

II Elizabeth, m. Joseph Peppin.^ Issue. 

III Mary, m. John Miller. 

IV George, died in London, unmarried. 

V Ann, m. John Robertson. 

VI WiUiam, b. April 1772; d. 3. November 1824; m. 1803. 
Irene de Grefl5n. Issue. 

No. 2 (I. VI) 

WILLIAM TRENHOLM 

Bom at Charleston. S. C. April 1772. died there 3 Nov. 1824. 
Married in New York 1803 Irene de Greffin. daughter of Comte 
de Greffin, a French landowner in St. Domingo. 

ISSUE 

I Wilham de Greffin, b. 26 June. 1805; d. 17 Aug. 1871; 

m. 20 Jan 1831 Ann C Lilly. 
II George Alfred de Sepos," b. 25 Feb. 1807; d. 9 Dec. 1876; 
m. 3 April 1828. Anna Helen Hohnes. 

III Charles Louis, b. Oct 1809; d. 16 Sept 1865; m. Oct. 1835. 

Portia Ashe Burden. 

IV Edward Leonard, b. 21 Sept, 1814; m. Sept. 1836 EUza 

Bonsall Holmes. 

V Esther Constance, d. 1857, m. Theodore Dehon Wagner. 

iss. 
VI Irene de Greffin, m. Thos. Osborn Dawson, iss. 
VII Arsene Louise, b. 1821; d. unmarried 14. Dec. 1869. 
Buried at Spartansburg, S. C. 

No. 3 (2.1) 

WILLIAM DE GREFFIN TRENHOLM 

Bom at Charleston 26 Jan'y 1805 died there 17. Aug. 1871. 
Married. 20 Jany 1831 Ann Cartwright Lilley. 

' There is a Tombstone in St. Phillip's churchyard to the Memory of 

Mathew Pippin died 1793. 

Mary Pippin died 1790 \ . 

Joseph Pippin died 1791 / '''^^''^^^ 
* Alfred George Trenholm dropped the "de Sepos" from his name. 



THE TRENHOLM FAMILY 153 

ISSUE 

I Annie Elizabeth, b. 19. Jan 1831; m. 30 Jan. 1857 James 

Young, of Alachua Florida. 
II Georgia Anna Helen, b. 11. Aug 1832; d. 1. June 1877; 
m. 25 Aug 1859 Alfred Haywood, of Savannah, Ga. 

III Paul Cartwright, b. 17. Oct. 1834; m. 20 Nov. 1856. 

Frances A. Dewar. 

IV Irene Ella, b. 29. Sept. 1836; m. 14. Apl 1864. Daniel B. 

Baker of Beaufort. S. C.; m. 12. Nbv 1873 Francis 
J. Baker of England. 

V Emily Julia, b. 26 Nov. 1838; d. 17 Nov. 1839. 

VI Emily Julia, b. 21 Aug. 1840; m. 6. Dec. 1859. Daniel H. 

Tucker. 
VII Esther Barron, b. 27 Mch 1845. 
Vni Lila LiUey, b. 15 Mch 1849; m. 28 Sept. 1870 H. W. 
Dews of Savannah, Ga. 

No. 4 

GEORGE ALFRED TRENHOLM 

Bom at Charleston 25 Feb. 1807 died there 9. Dec, 1876. 

Married 3 April 1828 Anna Helen Holmes, daughter of John 
Holmes Esq""®, of Johns Island, S. C. and his wife, Ann Glover, 
daughter of Major Charles Glover. 1756-1817. 

ISSUE 

I Willam Le. Seigneur, b. March 1829; d. Aug 1829. 

II Geogiana Elizabeth, b. March 1830; d. Sept 1831. 

III Charles Glover, b. April 1831; d. Aug 1831. 

IV George de Greffin, b. Jan 1833; d. July 1833. 

V WilUam Lee, b. 3. Feb. 1836; d. 11. Jan 1901; m. 1856 

Kate Louise Macbeth. Issue. , 

VI Irene de Greffin, b. 1837; d. Aug, 1838. 
VII EmUy St. Pierre, b. 16. Jan. 1839; m. 21 Jan 1864. Wil- 
liam Miles Hazzard. Issue. 
VIII Anna Helen, b. 15. Oct 1842; d. 1866; m. 1865 James 
Morris Morgan. Issue. 
DC Alfred Glover, b. 31. March 1844; d. 1877; m. 3. Apl 
1867 Caledonia Brice. Issue. 



154 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

X Francis Holmes, b. 1. May 1846; d. 1885; m. 1. June 

1865. Mary Elizabeth Burroughs. Issue. 
XI Eliza Florence, b. 22. June 1847; m. 4. Feb. 1868 Alex- 
ander Macbeth. Issue. 
XII Emma Josephine, b. 22 Mch 1850; d. 1885; m. 2. July 

1872 Legare Jones Walker. Issue. 
XIII Celestine Robertson, b. 17. May 1851; d. 1879; m. 15. 
Jan 1874. Derrill H McCollough. Issue. 

George A. Trenholm was one of the most distinguished citizens 
of Charleston, in the middle and later portions of the nineteenth 
century, and his memory deserves preservation. A great mer- 
chant, a statesman of high rank, a man of unusual attainments, 
he used his talents always for the benefit of Charleston, and the 
state. 

Entering early in Ufe the counting house of John Eraser, a 
Scotch merchant, he soon became a force in mercantile affairs 
on a large scale. John Eraser & Co., owned ships, and estab- 
lished agencies in several European ports, and, when the war 
between the states came, they placed their resources at the serv- 
ice of their country, bringing in supplies by blockade running 
Steamships, and cooperating with the Government of the Con- 
federate States of America, and continued to so act until the war 
ended when, naturally, the United States government endeavored 
to suppress the House. Mr. Trenholm was called to the coun- 
sels of the Confederate States and left his residence in Columbia 
on 16th July, 1864, for Richmond, and was Secretary of the Treas- 
ury until 7th April, 1865. He was imprisoned in the Charleston 
Jail by the United States authorities on 13th June, and sent thence 
on 18th June to Fort Pulaski. On the 25th June he was paroUed 
and returned to Charleston, on 12th July he was again arrested, 
and he remained a prisoner until 14th October. (All these dates 
are taken from the diary of JVIrs. Trenholm, who accompanied 
him.) 

At a meeting of the Charleston Chamber of Commerce, Mr. 
Elias Horry Frost, himself an honored President of the Chamber, 
thus spoke of Mr. Trenholm: "The most noteworthy instance of 
Mr. Trenholm's greatness was when two years before his death, 
at the call of his fellow-citizens, he gave up the loved and pleas- 



THE TRENHOLM FAMILY 155 

ant society of his home, in health then failing renounced his 
ease and comfort, reUnquished the care of his business, laid aside 
the remembrance of his fame, forgot that he was a Prince among 
Merchants and had sat in Cabinets, an adviser in the struggle 
of nations, laid aside the pride which might well have led him 
to believe it his due to be called only to the highest places in 
the land, and for months gave his time for the Public good to his 
duties as a member of the Legislature of his State." 

It was the universal respect for his character and wisdom, 
which was recognized even by the Adventurers and freedmen 
who then controlled the Legislature of South Carolina, that 
caused all to look to his influence for an amelioration of dreadful 
conditions. He did much to impress even such men as were 
robbing the State, and was listened to and treated with respect 
by them. 

Handsome in face and mien with the manners of a Prince, he 
charmed every one with whom he came in contact, and all 
learned to admire a great man with no affectations, nor any desire 
to seem to be anything he was not. 

No. 5 (2 in) 

CHARLES LOUIS TRENHOLM 

Bom in Charleston Oct 1809 Died there 16 Sept 1865. 
Married October 1835 Portia Ashe Burden, daughter of Kinsey 
Burden Esq. 

ISSUE 

I Marie Louise, b. Aug 1836; d. 24 Apl 1904; m. Jan 1861 
Tours Loire Bacot, Son of Maj. Peter Bacot. Issue. 
II Eliza Helen, b. 15. Sept 1838; d. 1888; m. May 1860 D'. 
Peter B. Bacot of Florence, S. C. 

III Irene de Greffin, b. July 1840; d. 5 Mch 1914. 

IV Mary Jane Keith, b. 4. Sept 1842. 

V George Alfred, b. 31 Mch 1845; d. 1899; m. P* May 1864 

Mary C. Smith; 2'"i Mary Brawley. 
VI Charles Louis, b. Apl 1847; d. 1915; m. 1«* Julia E. Smith; 

2nd 

VII Thomas Burden, b. 9 May 1850; d. 10. Nov. 1911; m. 22''d 
Dec 1869 Susan King Giradeau. 



156 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

No. 6 (2 IV) 

EDWARD LEONARD TRENHOLM 

Bom at Charleston, 21 Sept. 1814. Died at Flat Rock N. C. 
15. June 1883. 

Married Sept 1836 Eliza Bonsall Holmes, daughter of John 
Holmes, Esq"^. of Johns Island, S. C. 

ISSUE 

I Anna Glover, b. 1837; d. 22 June 1842. 

II Eliza GrimbaU, b. 1841; d. 12 June 1852. 

III George, b. 1843; d. 1855. 

IV Edward Leonard, b. 1843; d. 7. Aug 1873; m. 7. Sept 

1865. Jane Gordon Waties. Issue. 
V Savage Deas, b. July 1844; d. 22 Feb. 1895; m. 7 Aug 

1873, Alicia Middleton Ripley. Issue. 
VI Pierre Hohnes, b. 1847; d. 6 July 1848. 
VII Glover Hohnes, b. 1849; m. Julia M. Chisohn. Issue. 
Vin Helen Emily, b. 1851; m. 1874 Harry Morris GrimbaU. 
Issue. 
rX Louis de Greffin, b. 1853; m. 1«* 6 Nov 1877 Marie 
Simons Bowly. Issue. 2"<^ Mrs. Annabel Griffin. 

Mr. Edward L. Trenholm was a man of unusual ability and at- 
tainments, and was the associate in business of his brother. He 
lived in England for many years as managing partner in the 
house of Eraser, Trenholm & Co. 

No. 7 (3 III) 

PAUL CARTWRIGHT TRENHOLM 

Bom at Charleston 17 Oct. 1834. Died there. 
Married 20. November 1856 Frances A. Dewar, daughter of 
William G. Dewar. Esq**. 

ISSUE 

I William Wagner, b. 16 Sep't 1857; d. 22 Sept 1893. 
II Henry Dennison, b. 17 Aug. 1859; d. 9 Oct. 1859. 



THE TRENHOLM FAMILY 157 

No. 8 (4. V) 

WILLIAM LEE TRENHOLM 

Bom at Charleston 3 February 1836 Died at New York 11 
January 1901. 

Married 22 January 1856 Kate Louise Macbeth, daughter of 
James Macbeth Esq'*, of Charleston and his wife Mary Vander 
Horst Barksdale. 

ISSUE 

I WilUam, b. 8 Mch 1858; d. 1911; m. 1»* Alice Hood 2''<*. 
II George Macbeth, b. 3. Oct. 1859; d. 18. July 1902; m. 
17 Nov 1881 Claudia Bissell. 

III Mary de Greffin, b. 8. Aug 1861. 

IV Kate, b. 8. Jan. 1864; m. Jesse Daniel Abrahams. 
V Julian de Sepos, b. 1. Mch 1867; m. Maude Twells. 

VI Anna Helen, b. 31 Jan 1870; d. in infancy. 
VII Constance, b. 22 Nov. 1873; m. Russell Bellamy, of 

Wilmington, N. C. 
VIII Helen St. Pierre, b. 31 Jan. 1878; m. 29 Jan 1912 Fre'' 
Nash de Rosset. 
IX Arsene LeSeigneur, c. 21, Nov 1880; d. 5 Mch 1914. 

WiUiam L. Trenholm began his education at the school of 
Christopher Coates in Charleston. He entered, in 1852, the 
South Carolina College, and was graduated in 1855, with second 
honour in a large class. Soon after he entered the counting house of 
John Fraser & Co., of which his father was the chief partner. 
After his marriage he went to Liverpool for the firm of Fraser 
Trenholm & Co. He remained in England for five years with 
success in his business pursuits. 

In the winter of 1861, when the war between the states began 
he returned home, and at once became active in the organization 
of a company, known well afterwards as "The Rutledge Mounted 
Riflemen," of which he was made lieutenant and afterwards cap- 
tain. He enlarged the company to a battalion and became its 
major. 

In 1864 the company, incorporated in the Seventh South Caro- 
lina Cavalry, went to Virginia. On the day before the second 
battle of "Cold Harbor," the regiment became hotly engaged at 



158 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

"Madaquire Creek" where, out of six captains, a major and lieu- 
tenant colonel, seven officers were lost. Major Trenholm was 
severely wounded. He was made Lieutenant Colonel of a new 
regiment then sent from South Carolina. At the close of the war, 
Colonel Trenholm went back to Charleston and resumed his place 
in the commercial affairs of the city. He had been an alderman, 
1861 to 1865 and again served in that capacity from 1875 to 1877. 
In 1885 Governor Thompson appointed him to the Bankers 
Convention at Atlanta, and there he made an address in favor of 
sound finance and the maintenance of the Gold Standard, which 
attracted the notice of President Cleveland, who called him to 
the office of Civil Service Commissioner, afterwards appointing 
him Comptroller of the Currency. In 1889 he was made President 
of The American Surety Co. of New York, and went to reside 
there. He was subsequently president of The North American 
Trust Co. 

No. 9 (4. IX) 

ALFRED GLOVER TRENHOLM 

Bom 31. March 1844. Died Aug. 1877 at Greenville S. C. 
Married 3. April 1867 Caledonia Brice. 

ISSUE 

I Florence, b. 1. June 1868; m. 1908 Alexander Dunlop 

Lathrop. 
II Alfred, m. P* Caroline Rhodes; 2°<* Margaret Law. 
Ill Margurite, b. 11. June 1878; m. Robert Wooley. 

No. 10 (4X) 

FRANCES HOLMES TRENHOLM 

Bom 1"* May 1846 Died at Washington 1885. 
Married P* June 1865 Mary Elizabeth Burroughs, daughter of 
Henry K. Burroughs and Eliza G. De Saussure. 

ISSUE 

I William de Saussure, b. 12 Nov. 1866; m. Maude Ed- 
wards. Issue. 



THE TRENHOLM FAMILY 159 

II Francis Holmes, b. 5 Sep't. 1868. 

III Helen Morgan, b. 6 June 1871; m. William Wilson 

Breneman. Issue. 

IV Lillah, b. 13 Sept 1873; m. 1895 John G. Capers. Issue. 
V Bertha, d. infancy. 

VI Josephine, m. Hinckley Lyman. Issue. 
VII Ella, b. 10 Nov. 1877. 
VIII George Alfred, d. infancy. 

F. H. Trenholm joined the Confederate service when a mere lad, 
he was attached to the stafif of General Gist. He saw that gallant 
soldier shot through the heart; he was himself wounded on that 
occasion. After the war he engaged in planting near Columbia, 
then returned to his home in Charleston, going thence to Wash- 
ington in 1887. 

No. 11 (5 V) 

GEORGE ALFRED TRENHOLM 

Born 31 March 1845 Died at St. Joseph Mo May 1899. 
Married 1** May 1864 Mary Clifford Smith daughter of Phineas 
Smith Esq^^ 

ISSUE 

I Marie Louise, m. lebaud Hume, of Nashville Tenn. 
II Irene de Grefl&n, m. Beverley R. D. Lacy of St. Joseph. 
Mo. 

III Harriet Yeadon. 

IV George Alfred, m. Jessie Kemper of St. Joseph. Mo. 

V John Giradeau. 

VI Mary CUfford, b. 1882; d. 29 July 1907. 
Married 2''^ Mary Brawley. No issue. 

Mr. Trenholm was a Minister of the Presbyterian Church, 
South. 

No. 12 (5 VI) 

CHARLES LOUIS TRENHOLM 

Born April 1847 Died 1915. 

Married JuUa E. Smith daughter of Phineas Smith Esq'^. 



160 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

ISSUE 

I Charles Louis, m. Belle Grice. 

II Thomas Burden, m. Sarah Rutledge Bacot. 

Ill Alfred Legare. 

V Videau Marion, m. Edwin Halsey. 

rV Julia F., m. Robert Kelly. 

VI TaUiferro Thompson. 

VII Claudia Jenkins. 

VIII Frank Smith, m. Mary Lancaster. 

No. 13 (5 VII) 

THOMAS BURDEN TRENHOLM 

Bom 9 May 1850 Died at Camden S. C. 10. Nov. 1911. 
Married 22''<i Dec. 1869. Susan King Giradeau. daughter of 
Rev^ John I. Giradeau. D.D. 

ISSUE 

I Sarah Giradeau, b. 22 Jan 1874; d. 30 Mch 1902; m 18. 

June 1901 James Blair SpiUman. Issue. 
II Caroline Hopkins, b. 16 May 1877; m. 25 Feb 1903 D^ 
Andrew Burnett, of Camden. S. C. 

III John Bohun, b. 5 Sept 1879; m. 1909 Helen Hodges Jones. 

Issue. 

IV Minnie Adger, b. 25 June 1882. 

V Robert Webb, b. 23 Nov. 1886; m. Sept 1913 MacgUlirray 
Simpson. 
Married second Delia Hills. No issue. 

Mr. Trenholm was a Minister of the Presbyterian Church, 
South. 

No. 14 (6 IV) 

EDWARD LEONARD TRENHOLM 

Born 1843 Died at Greenville. S. C. 7 Aug 1873. 
Married 7 Sept 1865 Jane Gordon Waties. 



THE TRENHOLM FAMILY 161 

ISSUE 

I Edward George, b. 11 Aug 1866; m. Dec 1889 Elizabeth W. 

Rhett. 

II Eloise Waties, b. 30 June 1868; m. 16 Apl 1895 Richard 

Caldwell. 

No. 15 (6. V) 

SAVAGE DEAS TRENHOLM 

Born July 1844 Died at Flat Rock N. C. 22 Feb 1895. 
Married 7 Aug. 1873 Alicia Middleton Ripley, daughter of 
General Roswell S. Ripley. C. S. A. 

ISSUE 

I Edward, b. 28 Mch 1874; d. 29 July 1875. 

II Alicia Middleton, b. 26 Nov 1875; d. 1 Aug 1882. 

III Helen Grimball, b. 13 Aug 1877; d. 1909; m. 1 June 1904 

Overton Dickenson. 

IV John Middleton, b. 1. Oct. 1879; m. Louise Turley. 

V Mary Alice, b. 20 Feb. 1884. 
VI Leonard, b. 31 May 1885. 

No. 16 (6 VII) 

GLOVER HOLMES TRENHOLM 

Bom 1849. 

Married 16*"^. June 1875 Julia Chisolm. daughter of Doctor 
Julian J Chisolm. 

ISSUE 

I Mary Chisolm, b. 14 June 1876; m. 1909 James Ferguson. 

II Julia Chisolm, b. Jan 1878. 

III Eliza Holmes, b. Dec 1880; m. 1908 D^ W. Hopkins. 

IV JuHan Chisolm, b. Jan 1883; m. 1908 M^Kilopth. 

V Evelyn Chisohn, b. Mch 1885; m. 1906 Hardy Geiske. 
VI Glover Holmes, b. Dec 1886. 



162 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

No. 17 (6. IX) 

LOUIS DE GREFFIN TRENHOLM 

Bom 17. Dec. 1853. 

Married 1"* 7. Nov. 1877. Maria Simons Bowly. 

ISSUE 

I Maria Simons, m. Adlai Osborne. Issue. 

II Jane Heyward Vander Horst, m. Francis Bradley. 

III Louis de Greffin. 

IV Louise. 

V Edward Leonard, m. Lydia Griffin. 
Married 2''^ Mrs. Annabel Griffin. 

No. 18 (8.1) 

WILLIAM TRENHOLM 

Born 8 March 1858. Died at New York 1911. 
Married P* Alice Hood. No issue. 
Married 2'"^ . 

ISSUE 

I William Lee b. 1904. 

No. 19 (8. II) 

GEORGE MACBETH TRENHOLM 

Bom 3. Oct 1859. Died at Baltimore. 18 July 1902. 
Married 17 Nov 1881 Claudia Bissell. daughter of J. Bennett 
Bissell of Charleston. He was a lawyer by profession. 

ISSUE 

I Claudia, b. 18. Mch 1886; m. 1908 Frank G Boggs of 

Boston. 
II George Macbeth, b. 2 June 1892. 

No. 20 (8 V) 

JULLA.N DE SEPOS TRENHOLM 

Born 1 March 1867. 

Married Maude Twells daughter of John Twells Esq"* of Phila- 
delphia. 



THE TRENHOLM FAMILY 163 

ISSUE 



I Helen TweUs, b. 1897. 
II Julian de Sepos, b. 1902. 

No. 21 (9. n) 

ALFRED TRENHOLM 

Bom. 

Married 1"* Caroline Rhodes. 

ISSUE 

I Ruby Margurite. 

Married 2°*^ Margaret Law. of Darlington. S. C. 

No. 22 (10. 1) 

WILLIAM DE SAUSSURE TRENHOLM 

Bom 12. Nov. 1866. 
Married Maude Edwards. 

ISSUE 

No. 31 (14. I) 

EDWARD GEORGE TRENHOLM 

Bom 11. Aug 1866. 

Married 17. Dec. 1888 Elizabeth Washington Rhett daughter 
of Colonel Alfred Rhett. C. S. A. 

ISSUE 

I EUzabeth Rhett, b. 31. Aug. 1889; m. 12 July 1915 Arthur 

Stokes. Capt U. S. M. C. 
II Katherine Waties, b. 12 Oct. 1892. 
Ill Ann, b. 5 Oct 1894. 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 

1758-1788 

Copied by Mabel L. Webber 

(Continued from the July number) 

193: Robert Boone of the Parish of Prince- Frederick, Bachelor, 
and Elizabeth Gibbes of the Parish of X-t Church, Spinster were 
married at the Plantation of John Boone Esqr, of the Parish of 
X-t Church, by licence, this Ninth Day of September, Anno 
Domini 1784 by me S: F: Warren of the Parish of St. James 
Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Robert Boone 

Solemnized between usj Elizabeth Gibbes 

In the Presence \ Jn°. White 

of us J Jacob Jeanneret. 

194: Samuel Fenner Warren, Clerk of this Parish, Widower, 
and Lydia Perdreau of this Parish Spinster, were married at the 
Plantation of the Rev'd Samuel Fenner Warren of this Parish, 
Clerk, by Licence, this Twenty-first Day of November, Anno 
Domini, 1784 by me John Hurt of the parish of St. Stephen's 
Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was \ S: F: Warren 

Solemnized between us J Lydia Perdreau 

In the Presencel Esther Perdreau 

of us J Isaac Dubose. 

195: Thomas Rees of the Parish of Prince-George, Bachelor 
and Elizabeth Brumley of the Parish of Prince-George Spinster 
were married in the Dwelling-house of Eliz: Brumley of the Parish 
of Prince-George by Licence, this Twenty-fifth Day of November 
Anno Domini 1784. 

This marriage was \ Tho^. Rees 

Solemnized between us/ Elizabeth Brumley 

In the Presence \ Rob. Grant 

of us J William Burnett. 

164 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 165 

196: Albert Roux of the Parish of Prince-George, Bachelor 
and Elizabeth Trapier of the Parish of Prince George, Widow, 
were married in the Dwelhng of Mrs. Eliz: Trapier of the Parish 
of Prince George, by Licence, this Twenty-fifth day of November, 
Anno Domini 1784, by me, S. F. Warren, of the Parish of St. 
James Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was \ Albert Roux 

Solemnized between us / Eliz. Trapier 

In the Presence 1 Lewis Roux 

of us J Mary Dick. 

197: Lewis Bochet of the Parish of Prince-George Widower, 
and Rebecca Watts of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Widow, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of Mrs. Rebeca Watts of the 
Parish of Prince Frederick by Licence, this Ninth Day of De- 
cember, 1784, by me S. F. Warren of the Parish of St. James 
Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was \ Lewis Bochet 

Solemnized between us J Rebeckah Watts 

In the Presence! Benj. Duke 

of us J Joseph Boutwell 

198: Francis DesChamps of this Parish, Bachelor, and Su- 
sannah Joy of the Parish of X-t church. Spinster, were married 
in the dwelling-house of Mrs. Mary Simmons of this Parish, widow, 
by Licence this Thirtieth Day of December, Anno Domini 1784, 
by me S. F. Warren, of this Parish, Clerk. 
This marriage was \ Francis DesChampes 

Solemnized between us / Susanna Joy. 

In the Presence \ Geo: Sinclair Capers 

of us / Samuel Warren. 

199: Francis Perret of the Parish of Prince-Frederick Bachelor 
and Martha Murrel of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Spinster, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of William Murrel of the 
Parish of Prince-Frederick, by Licence, this Nineteenth Day of 
January, Anno Domini 1785, by me of the Parish of St. James 
Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was \ Francis Perret 

Solemnized between us / Martha Murrel 

In the Presence^ John Lequeux 

of us / William Murrell Junr. 



166 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

200: James Bryant of the Parish of Prince-Frederick, Widower, 
and Hezekiah Sutton of Prince-Frederick's Parish, Spinster were 
married at the dwelling-house of Mrs. Esther Micheau of the 
Parish of Prince-Frederick, Widow, by Licence, this Twenty- 
Seventh Day of January, Anno Domini, 1785, by me, S. F. Warren, 
of the Parish of St. James' Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was \ James Bryant X his mark 

Solemnized between us J Hezekiah Sutton X her mark 

In the Presence! Paul Michau 

of us J Ann Michau 

201 : WilUam Murray of the Parish of Prince-George, Bachelor 
and Elizabeth Bossard of the Parish of Prince-George, Spinster, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of M'. Tho's Hennings of 
the Parish of Prince George, by Licence, this Seventeenth day of 
March, Anno Domini 1785, by me S. F. Warren, of the Parish of 
St. James' Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was \ William Murray 

Solemnized between us j Elizabeth Bossard 

In the Presence\ Isaac Deliesseline 

of us / John Bossard. 

202: John DeLiesseUne of this Parish, Bachelor, and Eliza- 
beth Jennensof this Parish, Spinster, were married in the Dwelling- 
house of M'. Eward Jerman of this Parish, by Licence, this 
Seventh day of April, Anno Domini, 1785, by me S: F: Warren of 
this Parish, Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 John Deliesseline 

Solemnized between us J Ehzabeth Jennens 

In the Presencel Jn°. Buchanan 

of us J Isaac Danford. 

203: Francis Jones of this Parish, Widower, and Mary Lewis 
of this Parish, Widow, were married in the Dwelling-house of Mrs 
Mary Lewis of this Parish, by Licence, this Fourteenth day of 
June, Anno Domini 1785, by me S: F: Warren of this Parish, 
Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Francis Jones 

Solemnized between us j Mary Lewis X her mark 

In the Presencel R*^, Withers 

of us J Charles Lewis, 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 167 

204: Joseph Boutwell of the Parish of Prince Frederick, 
Bachelor, and Elizabeth Micheau of the Parish of Prince Frederick 
Spinster, were married in the Dwelling-house of M'. Paul Micheau 
of the Parish of Prince Frederick by Licence this Twenty-second 
day of June, Anno Domini 1785, by me S: F: Warren, of the Parish 
of St. James Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was 1 Joseph Boutwell 

Solemnized between us / Elizabeth Micheau 

In the Presence! Benj°. Guerry 

of us j Ann Micheau. 

205: John Bosssard of the Parish of Prince George, Bachelor, 
and Elizabeth Screven of the Parish of Prince George, Spinster 
were married at the Dwelling-house of M'. Richard Walker of the 
Parish of Prince George, by Licence, this Twenty third day of 
June, Anno Domini, 1785 by me S. F. Warren of the Parish of St. 
James Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was \ John Bossard 

Solemnized between us / EUzabeth Screven 

In the Presencel Isaac Deliesseline 

of us j William Murray. 

206: William Rowser of this Parish, Bachelor and Ehzabeth 
DeSchamps of this Parish, Spinster were married in the Dwell- 
ing-house of Mr. Peter DeSchamps of this Parish, by Licence, 
this Thirtieth day of June, Anno Domini, 1785 by me, S. F. War- 
ren, of this Parish, Clerk. 

This marriage was \ WilHam Rowser 

Solemnized between usj Elizabeth Deschamps 

In the Presence \ Martha Greenland 

of us j George Simmons. 

207: John Roach of the Parish of St. James' Santee, Bachelor, 
and Deborah Howard of the Parish of Prince-George, Widow, were 
married in the Dwelling-house of Thomas-Martin Sanders of the 
Parish of Prince George, by Licence, this Twenty-first day of 
July, Anno Domini, 1785, by me S: F: Warren of the Parish of 
St James' Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was \ John Roach 

Solemnized between us/ Deborah Howard. 

In the Presence \ Jo*. Logan 

of us j Christopher Willingham 



168 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

208: Thomas AUston of the Parish of All Saints, Bachelor, 
and Mary Allston of the Parish of George-town, Spinster, were 
married in the Dwelling-house of Captain John Allston of the Parish 
of Georgetown, by Licence this Twenty-first day of July, Anno 
Domini, 1785, by me S. F. Warren of the Parish of St James' 
Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was \ Tho*. Allston 

Solemnized between us j Mary Allston 

In the Presence^ Jn*. Waties 

of us / Benj". Allston. 

209: Robert Gillespie of the Parish of Prince George, Bachelor 
and Martha Durand of the Parish of Prince George, Widow were 
married in the dwelUng-house of Mrs. Martha Durand of the 
Parish of Prince-George, Widow, by Licence, this Twenty-Sixth 
day of July — Anno Domini, 1785, by me S. F. Warren of the 
Parish of St, James' Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was \ Ro*. Cooper 

Solemnized between us / Martha Durand 

In the Presence^ Sam'. Cooper 

of us / Childermas Croft. 

210: Thomas Martin Sanders of the Parish of Prince-Frederick, 
Wwr. & Ann Butler of the Parish of Prince George, Widow, were 
married in the dwelhng house of M'. Le Grand Guerry of the 
Parish of Prince-George, by Licence this Twenty-fifth day of 
August Anno Domini 1785, by me, S. F. Warren of the Parish of 
St. James' Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was \ T. M. Sanders 

Solemnized between us/ Ann Butler 

In the Presence \ Joseph Hoole 

of us / Thomas Ballow Jun'. 

211: Charles Lewis of this Parish, Bachelor, and Mary Jones 
of this Parish, Spinster, were married in the Dwelhng-house of the 
Reverend S. F. Warren, of this Parish, by Licence, this Twenty- 
fifth day of August, Anno Domini, 1785, by me S. F. Warren of 
this Parish, Clerk. 

This marriage was \ Charles Lewis 

Solemnized between us / Mary Jones 

In the Presence \ Francis Jones 

of us / Samuel Warren. 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 169 

212: Lemuel Wilks of the Parish of Prince-Frederick, widower 
and Esther Michau of the Parish of Prince-Frederick, Widow, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of Mrs. Esther Michau of the 
Parish of Prince-Frederick, by Licence, this eight day of September, 
Anno Domini 1785 by me S. F. Warren, of the Parish of St. James' 
Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was \ Lemuel Wilks 

Solemnized between us / Esther Michau 

In the Presence! Ja^. Walker 

of us I Edward Croft. 

213: Elias Rembert of the Parish of Prince George Bachelor 
and Mary Cook of the Parish of Prince George Spinster, were 
married in the Dwelling-house of Rev'^. S. F. Warren of this Parish, 
by Licence, this Fifteenth day of September, Anno Domini 1785, 
by me S. F. Warren of this Parish, Clerk. 
This marriage was \ Elias Rembert 

Solemnized by me / Mary Cook 

In the Presence! George Durant 

of us / Joseph Tomkins Cook. 

214: Anthony Ford of the Parish of Prince-Frederick, Bach- 
elor and Lydia Boone of the Parish of Prince-Frederick, Spinster, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of Mrs. Susanna White of the 
Parish of Prince-Frederick, Widow, by Licence, this Twenty- 
Second day of September, Anno Domini 1785, by me S. F. Warren 
of the Parish of St. James' Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was \ Anthony Ford 

Solemnized between us / Lydia Boone 

In the Presence\ Thos. Cole 

of us / W°*. Anthy Atkinson 

215: James Jaudon of the Parish of St. John, Widower and 
Alley Semple of this Parish, Widow, were married at the DweUing- 
house of Mrs. Alley Semple, of this Parish, Widow, by Licence this 
Sixth day of October, Anno Domini, 1785 by me S. F. Warren of 
this Parish, Clerk. 

This marriage was \ Jas. Jaudon 

Solemnized between us J Alley Semple 

In the Presence! Roger Sanders 

of us j Ch««. Chovin. 



170 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

216: Isaac Deliesseline of the Parish of Prince-George, Bach- 
elor, and Anne Bossard of the Parish of Prince-George, Spinster, 
were married in the DwelHng-house of Mrs. Anne Cuttino of the 
Parish of Prince-George, Widow — by Licence this Twentieth 
day of October, Anno Domini 1785 by me S. F. Warren of the 
Parish of St. James' Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was \ Isaac Dehessehne 

Solemnized between us J Ann Bossard 

In the Presencel John Deliesseline 

of us J John Bossard. 

217; Paul Bernard of the Parish of Prince-Frederick Bachelor, 
and Martha Atkinson of the Parish of Prince George, Spinster, 
were married at the Plantation of Robert Daniel of the Parish of 
Prince-George, by Licence, this Eight day of November, Anno 
Domini 1785, by me S. F. Warren of the Parish of St. James' 
Santee Clerk. 

This marriage was 1 Paul Bernard 

Solemnized between us J Martha Atkinson 

In the Presencel Thomas Ballon Jnr 

of us J Peter [blot] arr. 

218: James Boone of this Parish, Bachelor, and Sarah Blake 
of this Parish, Spinster, were married in the Dwelling-house of 
John Blake of this Parish, by Licence, this Tenth day of Novem- 
ber, Anno Domini 1785, by me S. F. Warren of this Parish, Clerk. 
This marriage was \ James Boone 

Solemnized between us / Sarah Blake 

In the Presencel Ja". Walker 

of us / Geo: McDowell. 

219: Christopher Willingham of the Parish of St. James^ 
Santee Bachelor, and Susanna White of the Parish of Prince- 
Frederick, Widow, were married in the Dwelling-house of Mrs. 
Susanna White of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Widow, by Li- 
cence, this Fifteenth day of November, Anno Domini 1785, by 
me S. F. Warren of the Parish of St. James' Santee Clerk, 
This marriage was \ Christopher Wilhngham 

Solemnized between us / Susanna White 

In the Presencel Sarah Hamhn 

of us J John Hamlin. 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 171 

220: William Cleiland of the City of Charleston, Bachelor, 
and Esther Maybank of the Parish of Xt. Church Spinster, were 
married in the dweUing-house of Mrs. Esther Maybank, widow 
of the Parish of Christ-Church, by Licence, this Fifteenth day of 
December Anno Domini 1785, by me, S. F. Warren of the Parish 
of St. James' Santee Clerk. 
This marriage was \ WiUiam Cleiland 

Solemnized between us J Esther Maybank 

In the Presence! S^. Swinton 

of us J Dan. Ward. 

221: Joseph Logan of this Parish, Widower and Anne Du- 
tart of this Parish, Spinster, were married in the DwelUng-house 
of John Dutart of this Parish, Widower, by Licence, this Fifteenth 
day of January, Anno Domini 1786, by me S. F. Warren, of this 
Parish, Clerk. 

This marriage was \ Jo^. Logan 

Solemnized between us / Ann Dutart 

In the Presence \ Daniel Sullivan 

of us J Daniel McGregor. 

222: Daniel McGregor, of this Parish, Bachelor and Magda- 
len Jeanneret of this Parish, Spinster, were married in the Dwell- 
ing-house of Jacob Jeanneret of this Parish, Senior, by Licence, 
this Thirty-first day of January, Anno Domini 1786 by me S. F. 
Warren of this Parish, Clerk. 
This marriage was \ Daniel M'^Gregor 

Solemnized between us/ Magdalen Jeanneret. 

In the Presence\ John Deliesseline 

of us / Sam^ DuPre. 

223: James Guerin of the Parish of Prince-Frederick Widower, 
and Anne Perdreau of the Parish of Prince-Frederick, widow, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of Mrs. Anne Perdreau of 
the Parish of Prince-Frederick, Widow, by Licence this Twenty- 
third day of February, Anno Domini, 1786, by me S. F. Warren 
of the Parish of St. James' Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was \ James Guerin 

Solemnized between us / Ann Perdreau 

In the Presence! Lemuel Wilks 

of us j Peter Guerin. 



172 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

224: Thomas Cole of the Parish of Prince-Frederick, Bachelor, 
and Sarah Hamlen of the Parish of Prince-Frederick, Spinster, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of Mr. John DeLiesseHne of 
this Parish by Licence, this Ninth day of March, Anno Domini 
1786, by me S. F. Warren, of this Parish, Clerk. 
This marriage was \ Thomas Cole 

Solemnized between us J Sarah Hamlin. 

In the Presence 1 Anthony Ford 

of us / John Dehesseline. 

225: Richard Withersof thisParish, Widowerand Mary Arthur 
of the Parish of Christ-Church, Widow were married in the 
Dwelling house of Mrs. Mary Arthur of the Parish of Christ- 
Church, Widow, by Licence, this Twentieth day of April, Anno 
Domini 1786, by me S: F: Warren of this Parish, Clerk. 
This marriage was \ R^. Withers 

Solemnized between us J Mary Arthur 

In the Presence 1 Clement demons Brown 

of us J Paul Murrell. 

226: Hugh Horry of the Parish of Georgetown, Bachelor, and 
Sarah Bonneau of the Parish of Georgetown, Widow, were mar- 
ried in the Dwelling-house of Mrs. Sarah Bonneau of the Parish 
of Georgetown, by Licence, this Twenty third day of April, Anno 
Domini 1786 by me S. F. Warren of the Parish of St. James' 
Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was \ Hugh Horry 

Solemnized between us J Sarah Bonneau 

In the Presence \ Peter Horry 

of us J H. Lenud. 

227. John Gamier of Prince George's Parish, Widower and 
Anne Keen of Prince George's Parish, Spinster, were married in 
the Dwelling-house of Mrs. Eliz: Withers of Prince George's 
Parish, Widow by Licence, this Twenty seventh day of June, 
Anno Domini 1786, by me S. F. Warren of the Parish of St James' 
Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was \ John Garner 's 

Solemnized between us/ Ann Keen 

In the the Presence \ James Withers t 

of us / William C. Shackelford. 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 173 

228: Alexander McGregor of the Parish of St James' Santee, 
Widower and Dorothy Guerry of the Parish of St Stephen, Widow, 
were married in the Dwelling-house of Mrs. Dorothy Guerry 
of the Parish of St Stephen widow, by Licence, this Fourteenth 
Day of September, Anno Domini, 1786, by me S. F. Warren of the 
Parish of St James' Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was \ Alex^ M<=Gregor 

Solemnized between us / Dorothy Guerry 

In the Presencel A. C. Guerry 

of us j Samuel Warren. 

229: Joseph Glover of the Parish of Prince George Widower & 
Jean Sinkler of the Parish of St Stephen Spinster, were married 
in the DweUing-house of Mr. James Sinkler of the Parish of St. 
Stephen by Licence, this Thirtieth Day of September, Anno 
Domini, 1786, by me S. F. Warren, of the Parish of St James' 
Santee Clerk. 

This marriage was \ Joseph Glover 

Solemnized between us j Jane Sinkler 

In the Presence\ Edw<^. Drake 

of us j Peter Sinkler. 

230: James Walker of the Parish of Prince Frederick, Bachelor, 
and Mary Guerry of the Parish of Prince-Frederick, Spinster were 
married in the Dwelling-house of Mr. Peter Guerry of the parish 
of Prince Frederick Sn^, by Licence, this Fifth day of October 
Anno Domini, 1786, by me S. F. Warren of the Parish of St 
James Santee, Clerk. 

This marriage was \ James Walker 

Solemnized between us / Mary Guerry 

In the Presencel Gabriel Rembert 

of us j Manassah Michau 

231: William- Anthony Atkinson of the Parish of Prince- 
George, Bachelor, & EHzabeth-Sarah Huggins of the Parish of 
Prince-George, Widow were married in the DweUing-house of Mrs. 
EHzabeth-Sarah Huggins, of the Parish of Prince-George, Widow, 
by Licence, this Sixteenth day of November, Anno Domini, 1786 
by me S. F. Warren of the Parish of St James' Santee, Clerk. 



174 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

This marriage was \ W™. Anthony Atkinson 

Solemnized between us j Elizabeth Sarah Huggins 

In the Presence 1 Tho^. Boone 

of us J Jn°. Jonah Murrell. 

232: Abraham Perret of the Parish of Prince-Frederick Wid- 
ower & Margaret Fendin of the Parish of Prince-Frederick, Spin- 
ster were married in the Dwelling-house of Sarah Fendin of the 
Parish of Prince-Frederick, Widow, by Licence Fifteenth day of 
March, Anno Domini, 1787 by me, S. F. Warren of the Parish 
of St. James' Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was \ Abraham Perret 

Solemnized between us J Margarit Fendin. 

In the Presence^ William Bu [rest illegible] 

of us / Sa — [rest illegible] 

233: Paul Murrell of the Parish of Christ Church Widower & 
Anna Edwards of the City of Charleston, Spinster were married 
in the Dwelling-house of Mr. James Anderson of this Parish by 
Licence, this Twentininth Day of March, Anno Domini, 1787, by 
me S. F. Warren, of this Parish, Clerk. 
This marriage was \ Paul Murrell 

Solemnized between us / Ann Edwards. 

In the Presence \ James Anderson 

of us / Ehzabeth Barton. 

234: James Bonham of this Parish, Bachelor & Hannah Lewis 
of this Parish, Widow, were married in the Dwelling-house of 
Mr. James Anderson of this Parish, by Licence, this Twentininth 
Day of March Anno Domini, 1787 by me S. F. Warren, of this 
Parish, Clerk. 

This marriage was \ James Bonham 

Solemnized between us / Hannah Lewis 

In the Presence \ James Anderson 

of us / Ehzabeth Barton. 

235: Lazarus Raney of this Parish, Bachelor, & Rebecca 
Whitfield of this Parish, Spinster, were married in DwelUng- 
house of the Rev'd Samuel Fenner Warren of this Parish, by Li- 
cence, this Third day of June, Anno Domini 1787, by me S. F. 
Warren, of this Parish, Clerk. 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 175 

This marriage was \ Lazarus Raney 

Solemnized between us j Rebecca Whitefield 

In the Presence! Hannah Bonham 

of us j Jo^ Logan. 

236: George Simmons of the Parish of St James Santee, 
Bachelor & Martha Allston of the Parish of Prince-George, Spin- 
ster, were married in the DwelUng-house of Mrs. Esther Allston 
of the Parish of Prince-George, Widow by Licence, this Fourteenth 
day of June, Anno Domini, 1787, by me S. F. Warren, of the 
Parish of St James' Santee, Clerk. 
This marriage was \ Geo. Simmons 

Solemnized between us J Martha Allston. 

In the Presence\ Benj^'. Allston 

of us j Sam^ Du Pre. 

237: Jacob Jeanneret of this Parish, Widower and Mary Sim- 
mons of this Parish, Widow, were married in the Dwelhng-house 
of Mrs. Mary Simmons of this Parish, widow, by Licence, this. 
Second day August Anno Domini, 1787, by me S. F. Warren of 
this Parish, Clerk. 

This marriage was \ Jacob Jeanneret. 

Solemnized between us/ Mary Simmons. 

In the Presence 1 Jn°. Buchanan 

of us j S. Warren. 

238: John Shoke of this Parish, Bachelor & Elizabeth Rich 
of this Parish, Spinster, were married in the Dwelling-house of the 
Reverend S. F.Warren of this Parish, by Banns, this Ninth day of 
September Anno Domini, 1787. 
This marriage was \ John Shokes 

Solemnized between us j Ehzabeth Rich 

In the Presence \ John Alexander 

of us / S. Warren. 

Married by me S. F, Warren of this Parish Clerk. 

239: James Bearman of this Parish, Bachelor, & Anne Neal, 
of this Parish, Spinster, were married in the Dwelhng-house of the 
Reverend S. F. Warren of this Parish, by Banns, this Eight day of 
April Anno Domini, 1788 by me S. F. Warren of this Parish, 
Clerk. 



176 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

This marriage was \ John Bearman 

Solemnized between us J Anne Neal X her mark 

In the Presence \ Daniel Joulee 

of us / S. Warren. 

240: WiUiam Neal, of this Parish, Bachelor, & Mary Joule, 
of this Parish, Spinster, were married in the Dwelling-house of 
the Reverend S. F. Warren of this Parish, by Banns, this Eight 
day of April, Anno Domini 1788, by me S. F. Warren of this 
Parish, Clerk. 

This marriage was \ William INTeale 

Solemnized between us J Mary Joulee 

In the Presence \ Daniel Joulee 

of us / -S. Warren. 

241: George Keckeley of the Parish of St. Thomas, Bachelor, 
and Catherine Barnett of this Parish, Spinster, were married in 
the Dwelling-house of Elisha Barnett of this Parish, by Licence, 
this Eight day of July, Anno Domini, 1788, by me S. F. Warren 
of this Parish, Clerk. 

This marriage was \ George Keckely 

Solemnized between usj Catherine Barnett 

In the Presence! EHsha Barnett 

of us j Ch^. Chovin. 

242: John Doar of this Parish, Bachelor, and Esther 
M^'Clellan of this Parish, Spinster, were married in the Dwelling- 
house of the Reverend S. F. Warren of this Parish, by Licence 
this Thirtieth Day of September, Anno Domini 1788, by me S. F. 
Warren of this Parish Clerk. 
This marriage was \ John Doar 

Solemnized between usj Esther M'^Clellan. 

In the Presence \ Sam. Dupre 

of us / Archb-i MClellan, Jun^ 

243: Edward June of this Parish, Bachelor, and Rebecca 
Egan of this Parish, Widow, were married in the Dwelling-house 
of Mrs. Rebecca Egan of this Parish, Widow, by Licence this 
Thirtieth Day of October, Anno Domini 1788, by me S. F. Warren 
of this Parish, Clerk. 



PARISH REGISTER OF ST. JAMES', SANTEE 177 

This marriage was \ Edw'^. June 

Solemnized between us/ Rebecca Egan 

In the Presencel Dan^. Joulee 

of us / John Steel. 

[The above entry closes the marriage register kept by the Rev. 
S. F. Warren. The next entry is dated 27 Feb. 1851, and the 
register has been continued from that date to the present time. 
We will only print Mr. Warren's register at present. The Rev. 
Samuel Fenner Warren was born in Suffolk, England, Dec. 14, 
1728 (old style) and died in South Carohna, 3d. March, 1789; 
he was buried in Echaw Church yard. 

The following clergymen are given in the register as officiating 
after Mr. Warren's death.] 

Rev*^. John Stuart was elected Rector, March 1789, was con- 
tinued in this cure two years. 

Rev<^. Thomas Bladen was elected 1797, remained in the Parish 
but one year. 

Rev^. John O'Donnel was elected in 1802 and left in 1804. 

He was succeeded in 1808 by Rev^. Philip Mathews, who re- 
moved to S*. Luke's & the Parish remained long vacant. 

The ReV^. Albert Muller officiated alternately at the Echaw & 
Wambaw Churches during the Winter & Spring of 1819. 

In 1822 the Rev*^. W™. Mitchell commenced his ministrations 
in this Parish, where he continued until . 

In 1835 the Rev^. C. C. Pinckney was elected and officiated 
until 1838, having service at the North Santee Church on every 
alternate Sunday. 

In 1839 the Parish being without a Minister the vestry invited 
the ReV*. Daniel Dupre, a Methodist minister residing here, to 
officiate at the Reading Desk, which he did, using the Liturgy exclu- 
sively, & with uncommon emphasis & reverence. He remained in 
Office about four years, but the Convention disapproved of the 
arrangement. 

In 1846 [corrected in pencil to 1844 or 5] the Rev^. Nathaniel 
Hyatt was elected to the Parish where he remained until his death 
in 1865. He continues the Record. 

(To be continued.) 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKE 

(August 1778 to May 1780) 
(Continued from the July number) 

July, 1779 Charlestown 

12*''.^ Orders by Major General Lincoln. 

All the Cont^. Soldiers now in Town belonging to the P*. Z^. & 
5th Regiments are to join the 5*^. 

In the daily returns for Rum, no Commissioned Officer is to be 
included; none are to draw but the Non Com<^. Officers, Drums, 
Fifes & Rank & File. 

Officers are to draw weekly for themselves & such of their Ser- 
vants who are not of the Army. 

All provision Returns & Returns for Rum are to be signed by the 
Commanding Officers of Battalions & Corps, who are desired to be 
exceeding careful that they agree with the Morning reports, which 
are to be made agreeable to the printed forms now in the Hands 
of the D. A. G. and are ready to be delivered out to the several 
Battalions or Corps. 

15*''. Commanding Officers of Regt^ & Corps are desired to be 
extremely attentive to the Orders of the 12*^^ Instant particularly 
with respect to the returns for rations & take the first Oppor- 
tunity of bringing to a Court Martial any Officers who may in 
future neglect to make proper Returns of their Companies to 
him. 

No more than two Women to each Company will be allowed to 
draw rations, & they are to be appointed by the Commanding 
Officer of the Regiment or Corps. 

W^. The Captain of the Day to visit the Continental Guards 
once in the Day & once in the Night. 

A Gen'. Court Martial to set on Monday next at 10 oClock 
in the new Barracks to try such prisoners as shall be brought be- 
fore them. President Lieu*. Col°. Bedault. Six Capt^ & 6 Sub^ 
from the different Cont'. Corps detail. 

' Several pages missing between June 27 and July 12. 

178 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKE 179 

Four Companies from the 2^. Cont^ Reg*, of S°. Carolina to 
hold themselves in readiness to march at a Moments Warning, 
The Col° is desired to appoint those Companies whose Tour of 
Duty is next. 

17*^^. The Light Infantry Company of the 2'^. Reg*, with Cap- 
tains Moultrie, Hall & Baker's Company are to go to Fort Moul- 
trie to be reUeved by Companies from thence. 

Lieut Col". Bedault- who was appointed President of the Gen'. 
Court Martial to sit on Monday next being a prosecutor of Pris- 
oners, Lieu*. Col°. Grimke is appointed in his place. 

19*^. Cap*. Thomas Shubrick of the 5*i> Reg*, in the Cont'. 
Service in the State of S°. CaroHna is appointed Aid de Camp to 
Gen'. Lincoln & is to be obeyed accordingly. 

September 14^ Headquarters, 

West Side of Zubly's Ferry 
Savannah River, 
M. O. Parole Laurens. Countersigns 
Barry, Burke, 
F. O. for tomorrow. 

A Capt. from the S°. Carolina Brigade to relieve Cap*. Van- 
derhorst. 

A Court of Inquiry is to sit immediately on the Conduct of Cap*. 
Belfield of Blands Light Dragoons on a Charge of absenting him- 
self without Leave & of ungentlemanly Behaviour in associating 
with a private Soldier. President Col°. Parker two Cap*^. from 
the Virginia Reg*. & two Cap*^. from the South Carolina Line 
Members. The pres*. will appoint a place for the Court to sit. 
All Evidences are to attend. 

N. O. The Court of Inquiry (of which Col°. Parker was pres*.) 
on the Conduct of Cap*. Belfield have reported "That with re- 
spect to Cap*. Belfields absenting himself without Leave, it ap- 
pears "That certain unavoidable Accidents which the Court 

2 Probably this is Charles Frederick de Bedaulx, of France, who was brevet 
captain, Continental Army, 10 May 1777 (Journals Cont. Cong., vol. 8, p. 475) 
and Lieut. Col. 1st Cavalry, Pulaski's Legion, 10 Dec. 1778 (Heitman and 
Jour. Cont. Cong. ,wo\. 12, p. 1210). Balch, in The French in America, gives 
his name as Lebrun do Bedeaux, the dates of appointment, &c., correspond- 
ing exactly, and states that he died in America. 

3 This date follows that of July 19 and is on the same page. 



180 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

thinks sufficient prevented his joining his Corps; And no Evidence 
appearing to support the latter part of the Charge, the Court unani- 
mously acquit him." The Court of Inquiry is dissolved. 

The Brigade Majors & Adjutants who take Orders will attend 
the Adjt. Gen^ for that purpose at 7 oClock in the Morning 12 at 
Noon & 6 in the Afternoon. 

The following Arrangements of the Troops is immediately to 
take place & to continue till further Orders. 

The 5**^ Regt. with one Sub: 2 Serj*^ & 33 Rank & File from the 
2d. One Sub: 2 Serj*«. & 33 Rank & File from the 3^. South 
Carolina regt^. & Cap*. Snipe's Troop of Horse are to form the 
Light Corps of the Army under the Command of Col°. Laurens. 

Cha^ Town 8"> August 1779. 
Sir/ 

You will be pleased immediately upon your Arrival at the Fort 
upon Cat Island to order without delay a return of the Stores in 
Garrison to be made you; A Copy of which with an Abstract of 
what you may want & cannot obtain in George Town you will 
transmit me by the very first safe Opportunity. You will be care- 
ful to examine the State of your powder; & if the Cartridges have 
been filled for a long time you will order them to be reformed & 
the Casks to be turn'd once a fortnight, lest the Salt Peter should 
Subside. You will cause the Militia to keep their Arms in good 
firing Order, always, & as they may have a Variety of Calibres 
amongst their Guns, I recommend Strongly to you that you have 
300 Rounds at least fitted to each Gun as immediately as possible 
& that you dispose of them in such a manner that they can be 
supplied in Case of Attack without Delay or Confusion. As the 
greater part of your Garrison will consist of Militia, & as hitherto 
they have done duty under their own Officers who commanded 
that Post, & they may probably be very relax in their Discipline, 
I would advise that you mount an Officers Guard if possible & 
that your Officer of the Day be not permitted to Sleep upon any 
Account whatever: To attain these desirable Ends, by visiting 
the Guards & Centinels every night you will probably instil an 
Obedience to Orders & inculcate the necessity of this Order & 
Disciphne into the Minds of your Officers & Soldiers by your 
Example — The Mihtia is not subject to Corporal Punishment & 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKE 181 

is only liable to Fines; but I have known Instances where the 
Officers have been cobb'd* very severely, when condemned thereto 
by their own people. If you could persuade them to adopt this 
practice, perhaps it would render your task easy; that of intro- 
ducing Regularity & Obedience. 

You will be careful that the Ammunition is not washed, & ex- 
amine your Beef, Bread & Water frequently, & Should it Spoil 
by keeping, you will immediately apply to Col°. Hireot for the 
Same Quantity which has proved bad. You will send Serg*. 
Smith into the Country who is to endeavour to collect Several 
Deserters, whom we have in that part of the State, & they will 
receive pardon upon delivering themselves up to him & joining 
your Command. I hope to hear frequently from you & am with 
my best wishes for your Success. 

Sir 

Your Ob*, hum: Serv*. 

John F. Grimke. 
Cap*. Davis 
Marching to 
Cat Island J 

Charles Town 25*'' Aug*. 1779 
Sir/ 

You will be pleased to march your Detachment to Augusta by 
the nearest Rout, where you will receive further Orders from Gen'. 
Mcintosh or the Commanding Officer for the time being. 

Your Detachment will Serve as a Guard to Some Waggons 
carrying up Stores for the Troops which you will Pay Some Atten- 
tion to both on your March & in your Encampment, always 
mounting a Centinel for this Security. Wishing you a pleasant 
March 

I am Sir 

Your Most Ob*. Hum: Serv*. 

John F. Grimke 



*See Oxford Dictionary, definition No. 3. 



182 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

To Lieu* Moorel 
Marching to }■ 
Augusta J 

Charles town 26*1^ Aug*. 1779 

Orders by L*. Col°. Grimke. 

The Ammunition Boxes for the 2^ 2 p'^''. Field pieces are to con- 
tain 48 Rounds each — Those for the 4 p". 24 rounds each; & those 
for the 6 p""^. 16 Rounds each. 

The Ammunition Boxes for the 2 p'^'"^ & 6 p''^. which are to be 
carried in the Ammunition Carts are to be adapted to the Di- 
mensions of the Carts; observing as nearly as possible the above 
Directions: The Carts will carry four Boxes probably, one of 
which is to be reserved for Cartridges to small Arms. 

The W*. of the 2 p^. Carts will be 360^: 3 Boxes Artillery Am- 
munition & about 100"^*. (Supposing 2000 Cartridges) for the 
Musquetry— Total 460 ^*. 

The W*. to the 6 p'^. Cart will be 3 Boxes Artillery Ammuni- 
tion 358^*. & about 10 ^\ of Musquet Cartridges in a 4*^^ Box- 
Total 458 W*. 

Eight Boxes (not including the 3 to the Cart) are wanted for the 
6 pounders. 

One hundred & Thirty Boxes are wanted for the four pounders 
of the above Dimensions. 

These Boxes are to be made very close, Strong & Dove tail'd, 
& the sides nailed to the Bottom, & not the Bottom to the Sides — 
the Apartments are to be very even & Square — the Hinges on the 
Outside of the Boxes & covered with Canvass. 

The Handles are to be of Wood, fastened with Screws, on each 
Side, thro' which is to be put a piece of Rope. 

The whole to he of Cypress ot Northward Pine. 
September, 1779.^ 

W^. The PS 3'^. & 6*^ Reg*^ of S°. Carolina with one half 
of the MiUtia Infantry will compose the Brigade on the right, 
to be commanded by Brig^ Gen". M^'Intosh. 

* Headquarters evidently still at West Side of Zubly's Ferry, Savannah 
River. The letters and orders of August 8, 25, & 26 being inserted between the 
regular order of dates. 



ORDER BOOK OF JOHN FAUCHERAUD GRIMKE 183 

The 2^. S°. Carolina & the Virginia Reg*». with the other half 
of the Militia will compose the Brigade on the left to be com- 
manded by Brig"". Gen'. Huger. 

The Draughts from the 2*^. & 3"^. regt^. are to be paraded at four 
oClock this Afternoon & to be picked Men. 

Dates of the Commissions of all the Field Officers in Camp & 
who may here after arrive are to be made to the A: G. without 
Delay. 

{To he continued.) 



DEATH NOTICES FROM THE SOUTH CAROLINA AND 
AMERICAN GENERAL GAZETTE, AND ITS CON- 
TINUATION THE ROYAL GAZETTE 

May 1766-June 1782 

Compiled by Mabel L. Webber 

{Continued from the July number) 

Died.] Mrs. Isabella Nevin, wife of John Nevin Esq. (Mon- 
day January 7, 1771.) 

Died.] Capt. Joseph Miles, of Ashepoo, much regretted by all 
who knew him. — Mrs. Martha Lloyd, Rehct of Mr. WilUam 
Lloyd. — In Georgia; Mrs. Ehzabeth Simpson, Wife of John Simp- 
son, Esq., of Sabine Fields; Mrs. Barnard, Wife of Edward Bar- 
nard Esq: Charles Watson, Esq; Clerk of his Majesty's Council 
in Georgia — Lately in London, Hon. James Box, Esq; Attorney 
General, and a member of his Majesty's Council for East-Florida. 
(Monday, January 14, 1771.) 

Died.] At Jacksonburgh, Mr. Moses Darquier, Merchant, 
much esteemed and valued by all who knew him. (Monday, 
January 28, 1771.) 

Died.] In the 75th year of his Age. Mr. Thomas Corker, Mer- 
chant. (Tuesday, February 5, 1771.) 

Died.] Mrs. Baker, Wife of Richard Bohun Baker, Esq. — 
Mr. Alexander Russel, Shipwright.— Mr. James Gordon, House 
Carpenter. — Mr. Elisha Poinsett, Sen. — Major Matthew Neilson. 
(Tuesday, February 19, 1771.) 

Died.] At At. Augustine, Feb. 24th, Henry Cunninghame, 
M. D. Assistant Judge &c. &c. greatly and universally lamented. 
(Tuesday, March 12, 1771.) 

Died.] Captain John Leaycraft, of the Sloop Charlestown, on 
his voyage from this Port to Antigua. — Captain Edward King, 
and one of the Sailors of the Sloop Ruth, washed overboard in a 
violent Storm on their Voyage from this Port to Dominica. 
(Tuesday, March 26, 1771.) 

Deaths.] ''On the 6th ult. died, at his Plantation in Prince- 
William's Parish aged 83 years Captain James Macpherson, a 

184 



DEATH NOTICES SO. CA. AND AM. GEN. GAZETTE 185 

Native of this Province, who in the first Indian War, and at sev- 
eral other periods since, served his country with Honour and 
Reputation. As he was remarkable for his Honesty Generosity 
and Humanity and more particularly so for his Friendly Disposi- 
tion so his Death is universally regretted." — In Charlestown, in 
the 18th Year of his age, Master John Mazyck, Son of Mr. Benja- 
min Mazyck. (Wednesday, April 10, 1771.) 

Died]. On his Passage from Bristol to this Port, John Wells, 
Master of the Brigantine Berkley. (Wednesday, April 17, 1771.) 

Deaths.] In Georgia, David Murray, Esq; Brother of John 
Murray, Esq; of Philpaugh, esteemed while living, now dead, 
sincerely lamented. — In Charlestown, where he lately arrived 
from St. Augustine, William Catherwood Esq; Surgeon to the 
40th Regiment of Foot, Barrack-Master at Halifax and Inspector 
of the Out Posts in Nova-Scotia, a Gentleman whose many valu- 
able Qualities had endeared to all who had the Pleasure of his 
Acquaintance. (Monday, May 8, 1771.) 

Deaths. In the 70th year of her age, Mrs. EHzabeth Holmes, 
Relict of Mr. Francis Holmes Senior. — Mrs. Elizabeth Darquier, 
Widow of Mr. Moses Darquier. — Mr. John Feltham. (Monday, 
May 20, 1771.) 

Deaths.] John M'^Kenzie, Esq; Member of Assembly for the 
Parish of St. James, Goose-Creek, a Gentleman well acquainted 
with Letters, strictly just in all his Deahngs warm in his Friend- 
ships, steady in his Principles, and happy in an amiable Con- 
sort and a numerous Acquaintance, by whom his Death is sincerely 
lamented. — Mrs. EHzabeth Smith, Wife of the Rev. Robert 
Smith, Rector of St. PhiHp's Charlestown. — Mrs. Henrietta 
Stanyarne, Wife of James Stanyarne Esq. — (Monday, June 10, 
1771.) 

Died.] Mrs. Elizabeth Bull, Wife of Stephen Bull, of Sheldon, 
Esq. (Monday, July 1, 1771.) 

Deaths.] Mrs. Alicia Weston, Wife of Mr. Plowden Weston, 
after a long illness, which she bore with truly Christian Patience 
and Resignation. — Mr. Charles You. (Monday, July 15, 1771.) 

Died.] In the Bloom of Life, Mrs. Sarah Somersall, the amiable 
Consort of Mr. William Somersall, Merchant, living much esteemed 
and valued by all who knew her, and now sincereley regretted. 
(Monday, July 22, 1771.) 



186 so. CA. HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE 

Deaths.] Mr. John Wilkie.— Mr. Edward Say. (Tuesday, 
August 6, 1771.) 

Deaths.] Mr. Samuel Smith, Son of the Honourable Wilham 
Smith Esq; of New York, deceased. A young Gentleman highly 
valued and esteemed by all who had the Pleasure of his Acquaint- 
ance. (Monday, August 12, 1771.) 

On Thursday Evening last, a Duel was fought with Pistols, in a 
Room in Mr. Holliday's Tavern on the Bay, between Dr. John 
Haly and Peter Delancey, Esq; Post-Master General of the 
Southern District of North-America, which unhappily ended in 
the immediate Death of Mr. Delancy. The Distress of the 
Famines of both Parties may be more easily imagined than 
described. 

The same Evening, and about the same Time, the Town was 
alarmed with the Cry of Fire, which was occasioned by a Hogs- 
head of Rum with the Bung out catching Fire from a Candle 
brought too near it, in the House of Wilham Davy, an honest in- 
dustrious man, by Trade a shoemaker, and living in Dennis's- 
AUey; the Hogshead burst with a loud Report, and the flaming 
Liquors immediately filled the House; two of Mr. Davy's Children 
were scalded in such a dreadful manner that they are since dead, 
and the unfortunate Father was likewise much Hurt in rescuing 
them from the Flames. The Fire was soon gotten under. It 
is hoped this melancholy Accident, a Correspondent says, will 
occasion People of all Ranks to be careful how they take Rum out 
of Bottles, as well as out of Casks, which ought never to be done 
by Candlelight. Servants are too often sent into Stables and 
other Places with Candles, some of them too young and unexperi- 
enced, and others, though old enough, equally careless; whereby 
the Town is in continual Danger. (Monday, August 19, 1771.) 

On Thursday last died here, the Oneida Chief, formerly men- 
tioned, well known to the British Traders by the Name of Thomas 
King; his Indian Name, as written by himself is Dayagouh-ae- 
Sereh. Two Physicians attended him during his illness, by Di- 
rection of his Honour the Governour. The Presents designed 
for him were sent to his Relations under the care of his Attendants 
who went by Water, on Saturday last, for Philadelphia, in Order 
to return to their own Country. (Tuesday, September 10, 1771.) 



DEATH NOTICES SO. CA. AND AM. GEN. GAZETTE 187 

Deaths.] Rev. Thomas Panting, A. M. Rector of St. Andrew's 
Parish. — Mr. Jarvis Williams.' — Mr. David StoU. (Tuesday. 
September 24, 1771.) 

Deaths.] WiUiam Brisbane, Esq; two Days after his Arrival in 
Scotland, where he went for the Recovery of his Health. — Mr. 
Gibbes, Purser of his Majesty's Ship Tartar, lately arrived here 
from England. — Dr. Giles Church in Georgia. — Rev. Nathaniel 
Cotton at Pansacola, Chaplain to the Garrison there. — Mrs. John- 
ston, Wife of Mr. James Johnston. — The Death of Mr. Jarvis 
Williams, mentioned in our last, was an Error owing to misinfor- 
mation, Mr. Williams is verv well. (Monday, September 30, 
1771.) 

{To be. continued.) 

1 An error, see next notice. 



INDEX 



Abraham, Plains of, 129. 

Abrahams Jesse Daniel, 157. 

Accabee, 1, 49, 

Albemarle Point, 2, 3, 4, 8, 49. 

Alexander. Charles, 65. 

Alexander, John, 81, 83, 175. 

All Saints, Barbadoes, 55. 

Allston, Mrs.. 111. 

Allston, Ann, 112. 

Allston, Benjamin, 112, 168, 175. 

Allston, Elizabeth, 111, 112. 

Allston, Esther, 175. 

Allston, Francis, 78. 

Allston, Hannah, 78, 79. 

Allston, Capt. John, 168. 

Allston, Martha, 175. 

Allston, Mary, 168. 

Allston, Thomas. 168. 

Allston, William, 21, 78. 

Allston, William, Jr., 78. 

Allwell, John, 29. 

Alston, Mrs. 111. 

Alston, Ann, 22. 

Alston, William, 142. 

Amory, John, 131. 

Amos, Corp., 31. 

Anderson, Alexander, 113. 

Anderson, James, 32, 116, 174. 

Anderson, Sarah, 69. 

Ander on, Seymoure, 29. 

Apshead, John, 29. 

Apthorpe, Anthony, 29. 

Armstrong, Capt., 44. 

Armstrong, Maj., 43. 81, 85, 123, 126. 

Armstrong, Col., 81, 82, 83, 85, 123, 
124 

Arnold, Mr., 100. 

Arthur. Francis 91. 

Arthur, George, 70. 

Arthur, Mary, 172. 

Arthur, Nathaniel, 70. 

Ashe, Richard-Cochran, 129. 

Ashepoo, 184. 

Ashford, William, 29. 

Ashley, Anthony (Lord), 1, 2, 52. 

Ashley Ferry, 45. 

Ashley Hall plantation, 66. 

Atchison, Mary, 21. 

Atkins, Edmond, 86. 

Atkinson, George, 16. 

Atkinson, Hannah, 16. 

Atkinson, Martha. 170. 



Atkinson, William Anthony, 118, 169, 

173, 174. 
Augusta, Ga., 36. 
Axson, Esther, 20. 

Backer, Sarah, 12. 
Backhouse, Benjamin, 37 (2). 
Backhouse, Katherine, 37. 
Bacon's Bridge. 43, 44. 
Bacot. Peter, 155. 
Bacot, Peter B., 155. 
Bacot, Sarah Rutledge, 160. 
Bacot, Tours Loire, 155. 
Bailey, Hester, 79. 
Baker. Lt. Col.. 44, 80. 
Baker, Buckner, 48. 
Baker, Mrs., 184. 
Baker. Mary, 121. 
Baker, Richard Bohun, 184. 
Baker, William, 131. 
Baldwin, William, 29. 
Balentine, Sarah, 12. 
Ball, Benjamin, 135. 
Ball, Samuel, Senr., 91. 
Ballow, Thomas Jr., 168, 170. 
Banbury, Elizabeth, 34. 
Baptist, John, 29. 
Barbot, Anthony, 8. 
Barclay, Capt., 46, 47. 
Barefield, Jesse, 29. 
Barker, Benjamin. 85. 
Barkley, Capt., 39 

Barksdale, Mary Vander Horst, 157. 

Barnard, Mrs., 184. 

Barnard, Edward, 184. 

Barnett. Catherine, 176. 

Bamett, Elish, 176. 

Barnett, Jon., 20. 

Barnwell, Mrs., 35. 

Barnwell, John Jr., 35. 

Barnwell, Joseph W., 139. 

Baron, John, 152. 

Barron, Esther, 151. 

Barton, Elizabeth, 112, 174. 

Barton, John, 73. 

Barton, Hannah, 19. 

Barton, William, 19 71, 78, 115, 118. 

Batchelor, John, 29. 

Beale, Othniel, 94. 

Bear, George, 120. 

Bearman, Anne, 70^ _ 

Bearman, James, 175. 



189 



190 



INDEX 



Beaufort, S. C, 34. 

Bedaulx, Charles Frederick de, 178, 

179. 
Bedon, George 66, 88. 
Bedon, George, Jr., 94. 
Bedon, Stephen, 132 
Bee, Col. John, 90. 
Bee, Susanna, 90. 
Beach Hill, 43. 
Beekman, Mrs., 88. 
Beekman, Barnard, 88. 
Belfield, Capt., 179, 180. 
Bell, Elizabeth, 117. 
Bell, James, 69, 70. 
Bell, John, 20. 
Bell, Mary, 115. 
Bell, Col. Thomas, 129. 
Bellamy, Russell, 157, 
Bellinger, William. 129. 
Bennet, Elizabeth, 11, 12. 
Bennet, Hugo, 11. 
Bennett, John, 25. 
Bennett, Sarah, 117. 
Bennett, Thomas, 86. 
Beresford, John, 7. 
Berlin, Abraham, 29. 
Bernard, Esther, 75. 
Bernard, James, 22. 
Bernard, Paul, 170. 
Bernard, Penelope, 76. 
Berresford. John, 138. 
Bilboa, Nicholas, 29. 
Bissell, Claudia, 157, 162. 
Bissell, J. Bennett, 162. 
Black, Richard, 34. 
Bladen, Rev. Thomas, 177. 
Bladwell, James, 29. 
Blake, Edward. 65. 
Blake, John, 65, 70, 120. 
Blake, Mary, 65. 
Blake, Richard, Jr., 16, 70. 
Blake, Sarah, 65, 170. 
Blanchefield, James, 29. 
Bland, Andrew, 29. 
Blanchard, Henry, 137. 
Blanshaw, Francis, 13. 
Bluff Bank plantation, 63. 
Blundy, Charles, 36. 
Bochet, Henry, 69. 73. 
Bochet, Lewis, 165. 
Bochet, Mary, 116. 
Boggs, Frank G., 162. 
Boineau, Judith, 69. 
Boineau, Mary, 122. 
Boineau, Michael, 17, 69, 122. 
Bond, Catherine, 18. 
Bond, Maj. George Paddon, 18. 
Bond, Capt. Robert, 34. 
Bonham, Hannah, 175. 



Bonhost, Elizabeth, 18. 

Bonhoste, Hester, 115. 

Bonhoste Jonah, 18. 

Bonhoste, Mary, 117. 

Bonhoste, William, 115. 

Bonneau, Mrs., 111. 

Bonncau, Anthony, 110. 

Bonneau, Sarah, 172. 

Bonnet, Major, 37. 

Bonneau, Peter, 68. 

Boone, Capers, 75. 

Boone, James, 120, 170. 

Boone, Jane, 132. 

Boone, John, 24, 164, 

Boone, Lydia, 169. 

Boone, Mary, 75. 

Boone, Robert, 164. 

Boone, Susanna, 24. 

Boone, Thomas, 174, 

Boone, Thomas, Junr., 16. 

Boone, William, 75, 132. 

Boshat, Nicholas, 115, 116, 

Bossard, Anne, 170. 

Bossard, Elizabeth, 166. 

Bossard, John, 166, 167, 170. 

Boston, Mass., 35. 

Boswood, Samuel, 54. 

Bourdeshore, Peter, 29. 

Boutwell, Joseph, 165, 167. 

Bowen, C. C, 59. 

Bowen, Thomas, 29. 

Bowen, William, 22. 

Bower, Patrick, 17. 

Bowie, Capt., 41, 45, 81, 83, 85, 126. 

Bowly, Maria Simons, 162. 

Bowrie, Maj., 43. 

Box, Hon. James, 184. 

Bradley, Francis, 162. 

Brailsford, Samuel, 92. 

Branford, Ann, 8. 

Branford, Elizabeth, 8, 14. 

Branford, John, 7, 8. 

Branford, WUliam, 7, 8, 12, 36, 65, 

130. 
Braund, John, 132. 
Brawley, Mary, 155, 159. 
Bremar, Francis, 90. 
Bremar, Martha, 90, 93. 
Breneman, William Wilson, 159, 
Brice, Caledonia, 153, 158. 
Brillat, Corp., 31. 
Brisbane, William, 187. 
Broadhead, Col., 101. 
Brockington, John, 24. 
Brockinton, Margaret, 23, 24, 
Broughton, Peter, 90. 
Broughton, Thomas, 62. 
Brown, Alexander H., 59. 
Brown, Archibald, 47, 



INDEX 



191 



Brown, Clement C, 172. 

Brown, John, 7, 29 

Brown, Capt. Joseph, 130. 

Brown, Mary, 136, 137. 

Brown, Robert, 137. 

Brown, Col. Thomas, 27, 28. 

Brown's Ferry, Clement, 109. 

Brumley, Elizabeth, 164. 

Bruneau, James Allen, 69. 

Bryan, Bernaby, 29. 

Bryan, James, 9. 

Bryant, James, 166. 

Buchanan John, 112, 117, 121, 166, 

175. 
Bull, Elizabeth, 185. 
Bull, John, 37. 
Bull, Stephen, 9, 65, 66, 185. 
Bull, William, 7, 66. 
Bull, William Izard, 66. 
Bull, William Stephen, 66. 
Bullard, Edward, 36. 
Bulline, John, 137. 
Bulloch, John, 9. 
Bulloch, Mary, 9. 
Burden, Kinsey, 155. 
Burden, Portia Ashe, 152, 155. 
Burgess, Sergt., 31. 
Burke, Landed Gentry, 11. 
Burnett, Dr. Andrew, 160. 
Burnett, Wilham, 164. 
Burnham, Jonathan, 35. 
Burnham, Charles, 35. 
Burnham, Margaret, 35. 
Burnham, Mary, 35. 
Burnham, Nicholas, 35. 
Burroughs, Henry K., 158. 
Burroughs, Mary Elizabeth, 154, 

158. 
Burthell, Sergt., 32. 
Burwell, Lt. Col., 83. 

Butler, , 13. 

Butler, Ann, 168. 

Butler, Gen., 39, 43, 44, 46, 80, 81. 

84, 85, 124, 125, 126, 127. 
Butt, Peter, 110. 

Caddet, Jean, 29. 
Caird, Capt. James, 90. 
Caldwell, Richard, 161. 
Calhoon, James, 22, 23. 
Calhoun, William, 125. 
Calybites, 27. 
Camden, 98. 
Campbell, Lieut., 45. 
Campbell, James, 30, 77. 
Canoly, Edward, 77. 
Cantey, Charles, 143. 
Cantey, George, 7, 
Capers, Geo. Sinclair, 165. 



Carlile, John, 29. 

Carpenter, George, 36. 

Carpet-baggers, 59. 

Carr, Edward, 23 (2). 

Carson, Elizabeth, 90. 

Carson, James, 90. 

Carteret's Relalio)!, 2. 

Cartwright, Daniel, 7. 

Carwithen, Willi m, 131. 

Cassels, Mrs., 129. 

Cassels, James, 129. 

Catawber Indians, 87. 

Catherwood, William, 185. 

Cattell, Anne, 125. 

Cattell, Ann Ferguson, 125. 

Cattell, Benjamin, 125. 

Cattel, John, 90, 132. 

Cattell, Lydia, 125. 

Cattell, Margaret, 132. 

Cattell, Mary, 57, 60. 

Cattell, William, 5, 125. 

Cattell, William, Jr., 125. 

Cattin, Capt. Nathaniel, 131. 

Chamberling, Capt. John, 132. 

Chambers, John, 9. 

Champneys, Roger, 29. 

Channel, Atkin, 108. 

Chaplin, John, 136, 137. 

Chapman, John, 92. 

Chappel, Isabella, 69. 

Charles Town (Old) and its Vicinity, 

1, 49, map of, 1. 
Charles Town Library Society, 132. 
Charners, Hannah, 77. 
Charnock, Sergt., 31. 
Cheesborough, Elizabeth, 77. 
Cheesborough, John, 77. 
Chicken, Dorothy, 70. 
Cherokee War, 124. 
Cherokee Treaty, 104. 
Chicken, William, 70. 
Chisolm, Julia, 161. 
Chisolm, Julia M., 156. 
Chisolm, Dr. Julian J., 161. 
Chovin, Alexander, 79. 
Chovin, Charles, 169, 176. 
Church, Dr. Giles, 187. 
Churne, Anthony, 9. 
Clark, Col., 101, 102, 103. 
Clark, Alexander, 136. 
Clark, James, 30. 
Clark, William, 29. 
Clarke, Thomas, 7. 
Cleiland, William, 109, 171. 
Clement, Benjamin, 29. 
Clement, John, 29. 
Clerk, John, 20. 
Cleveland, President, 158. 
Clifford, Benjamin, 9. 



192 



INDEX 



Clifford, Charles, 9. 
Clifford, Sarah, 9. 
Clifford, Stephen, 9. 
Clifford, Thomas, 36, 90. 
Clitherall, Major, 107. 
Clitherall, Elizabeth, 91. 
Clitherall, Dr. James, 91. 
Coates, Christopher, 157. 

Cobb, , 102. 

Cogdell, John, 76. 

Cold Harbor, 157. 

Cole, Anne, 132. 

Cole, Richard, 132. 

Cole, Thomas, 169, 172. 

Coleman, Sergt., 32. 

Coleman, Thomas, 89. 

Colleton, Sir Peter, 52, 54, 55, 56. 

Collins, Esther, 121. 

Collins, Jonah, 69, 117. 

Commander, George, 95. 

Commander, Hannah, 95. 

Commander, James, 95. 

Commander, Samuel, 94. 

Congregationalists, 7. 

Conner, Mr., 37. 

Conner, Patience, 21. 

Connors, John, 112. 

Constant, Capt. Henry, 34. 

Continental Regiment (2d. S. C. 
Foot), 25-33. 

Conyers, Corp.. 31. 

Cook, John, 29. 

Cook, Joseph Tomkins, 169. 

Cook, Mary, 169. 

Cook, Obedience, 116. 

Cooke, Rebecca, 94. 

Coombs, John, 76. 

Cooper, Major, 107. 

Cooper, Samuel, 119^ 168. 

Coppin, Elizabeth, 12. 

Coram, Mrs., 132. 

Coram, John, 132. 

Corker, John, 32. 

Corker, Thomas, 184. 

Cornwallis, Lord, 98. 

Cotton, 49. 

Cotton, Rev. Nathaniel, 187. 

Country Club, 53. 

Courtin, Thomas, 129. 

Couturier, John, 119. 

Cowen, Francis, 29. 

Cowpen plantation, 63. 

Cozens, Capt., 102. 

Crawford, Arthur, 29. 

Crawford, John, 29. 

Crafts, George I., 61, 63. 

Crafts, William, 63. 

Creek Indians, 27. 

Creighton, Adam, 29. 



Croft, Catherine, 88. 
Croft, Childermas, 88, 109, 168. 
Croft, Edward, HI, 169. 
Croft. Elizabeth, 110. 
Croft, Judith, 74. 
Crokatt, Dr. James, 68. 
Cromartie, George, earl of, 86. 
Cromwell, Esther, 73. 
Cromwell, Oliver, 73. 
Crook, Ann, 78. 
Crook, Elizabeth, 78. 
Cross, Mary, 110. 
Cruger, Col., 102, 103. 
Cryer, John, 113. 
Cryer, Martha, 113. 
Culcheth, Alice, 62. 
Culpepper's Map, 4, 50, 54, 67. 
Gulps, Josiah or Joseph, 31. 
Cunningham, Robert, 27, 29. 
Cunninghame, Henry, 184. 
Curless, John, 20. 
Curtis, Sergt., 32. 
Cuthbert, George, 87. 
Cutter, Capt. WilHam, 36. 
Cuttino, Anne, 170. 
Cutts, Bridget, 93. 
Cutis Genealogy, 93. 
Cygnet (ship), 37. 

Dal ton, Joseph, 9. 

Dandridge, William, 87. 

Danford, Isaac, 166. 

Daniel, Adam, 36. 

Daniel, Robert, 121, 170. 

Daniel, Capt. Robert, 137. 

Darquier, Elizabeth, 185. 

Darquier, Moses, 184, 185. 

David, Ezekial, 88. 

Davidson, William, 24. 

Davie, Lieut., 46. 

Davies, Robert, 89. 

Davis, Capt., 181, 182. 

Davis, Anson, 30. 

Davis, John, 30. 

Davis, Mason, 30. 

Davis, Mary, 137. 

Davies, Capt. Richard, 87. 

Davis, Thomas, 110. 

Davis, William. 30, 90. 

Davis, Lt. William, 136. 

Davy, William, 186. 

Dawson, Thos. Osborn, 152. 

Dayagough-ae-Sereh, 186. 

Dealey, Robert, 79. 

Death notices from the South Caro- 
lina and American General Ga- 
zelle, 34, 86, 129. 

de Greffm, Count, 152. 

de Greffin, Irene, 152. 



INDEX 



193 



Dekeyser, Major, 42. 
Delancey, Peter, 186. 
Delaunay, Jean Baptiste, 30. 
Deliesseline, Eliza Mary, 17. 
Deliesseline, Isaac, 110,114, 166, 167, 

170. 
Deliesseline, John, 166, 170, 171, 172. 
Deliesseline, Joseph, 113, 
Delony, Arthur, 23. 
Delworth, Godard, 78. 
Denholm, George, 73, 74. 
Denny, Thomas, 17. 
Denton, John, 34. 
Dering, James, 129. 
de Rosset, Frederick Nash, 157. 
De Saussure, Eliza G., 158. 
Des Champs, Elizabeth, 167. 
Des Champs, Francis, 20, 165. 
DesChamps, Peter, 78, 167. 
Deveaux, Andrew, 6, 14, 149. 
Deveaux, James, 14. 
Deveaux, John, 14. 
Devinney, Peter, 30. 
Dewar, Frances A., 153. 156. 
Dewar, William G., 156. 
Dews, H. W., 153. 
Dexter, Ann, 119. 
Dexter, Cecelia, 109. 
Dick, Dr. James, 130. 
Dick, Mary, 165. 
Dickinson, Capt., 36. 
Dickensen, Overton, 161. 
Dill, Jane Elizabeth, 60. 
Dishington, James, 131. 
Doar, John, 176. 
Dodd, John, 131. 
Dogharty, Capt., 123. 
Donnom, William, 30. 
Dorchester (S. C), 7, 36. 
Dorchester (Mass.), 7. 
Doughty's plantation, 106. 
Douxsaint, Paul, 20, 21. 
Douxsaint, William, 119. 
Dowden, Joseph, 54. 
Dowden, Thomas, 55. 
Downing, Timothy, 30. 
Doyley, Daniel, 130. 
Drake, Edward, 17, 173. 
Drake, John, 2, 19, 21, 110. 
Drake, Matthew, 21. 
Drayton, Mrs., 35. 
Drayton, John, 64, 65. 
Dra3'ton, Stephen, 35. 
Duborough, Hugh, 30. 
Dubose, Isaac, 71, 164. 
Dubose, Joanna, 71. 
Dubose, Samuel, 119. 
Du Bose, Capt. Samuel, Orderly book 

of, 25-33. 
Dubourdieu, Joseph, 19, 68. 



Dubourdieu, T., 23. 

Duel (between Dr. Haly and Peter 

Delancey), 186. 
Duke, Benjamin, 165. 
Dumay, Stephen, 16. 
Dunbar, Charles, 64. 
Dunbar, Jacob, 30. 
Dunbar, Thomas, 121, 
Duncan, .Alexander, 87, 88. 
Dunlap, Major, 101, 102, 103. 
Dunnant, John, 34. 
Dupont, Anne, 69. 
Dupre, Ann, 16, 17, 20. 
Dupre, Daniel, 76. 
Dupre, Rev., Daniel, 177. 
Dupre, Samuel, 17, 20, 171, 175, 176. 
Dupuis, Francis, 30. 
Durand, James, 24. 
Durand, Martha, 168. 
Durante George, 169. 
Durham, England, 151. 
Dutart, Ann, 120, 171. 
Duthie, James, 91. 
Dyer, Isaac, 32. 

Early, Jeremiah, 30. 
Eaton, Maj., 43, 46, 80, 84, 127. 
Echaw Church, 118, 177. 
Edisto Inlet, 28. 
Edisto Island, 91. 
Edmund, Sergt. Maj., 32. 
Edwards, Anna, 174. 
Edwards, Maude, 158, 163. 
Edwards, Thomas, 42. 
Egan, Rebecca, 176, 177. 
Eggleston, Major, 142. 
Elliott, Artemus, 35. 
Elliott, Barnard, 88. 
Elliott, Champernoun, 93. 
Elliott, Charles, 59. 
EUiott, Elizabeth, 88. 
Elliott, Joseph, 12, 36. 
Elliott, Mary Ann, 12. 
Elliott, Thomas. 61, 129. 
Elliott, Williams, 35. 
Elliott family, 9. 
Ellis, Rebekah, 72. 
England, Anne, 120. 
England, Martha, 112, 113. 
England, Susanna, 113, 115. 
England, Thomas, 113. 
English, John, 121. 
English, Mathew, 138. 
Enoree Rives, Camp at, 101. 
Eustas, John, 32. 
Eustace, Capt. Sheppard, 34. 
Evans, Rev. John, 129. 
Evans, William, 30. 
Eveleigh, Samuel, 35. 



194 



INDEX 



Fagan, Peter, 30. 

Fairfield plantation, 14. 

Falks, Mary, 109. 

Farmer, Rev., 91. 

Farmer, James, 72. 

Fawcett, Thomas, 138. 

Fay, Edward, 30. 

Feltham, John, 185. 

Fendin, Margaret, 174. 

Fenwick, Edward, 62, 63. 

Fenwick, John, 30. 

Ferguson, Alexander, 30. 

Ferguson, James, 161. 

Ficklin, William, 30. 

Fidling, Francis, 10, 11. 

Fillory, Stephen, 30. 

Filtner, Conrad, 30. 

Finden, Thomas, 54. 

Finly, Richard, 85. 

Fishburne, Edward B., 59. , 

Flinn, Nicholas, 30. 

Florida Rangers, 27. 

Foissin, Elias, 23, 36. 

Foissin, Elizabeth, 23. 

Fontaine, Francis, 30. 

Ford, Ann, 68. 

Ford, Anthony, 119, 169, 172. 

Ford, George, 68, 75, 78, 115, 120. 

Ford, G. W., 117. 

Ford, Rebecca, 111. 

Ford, Stephen, 117. 

Ford, Stephen, Jr., 77, 78, 111, 118. 

Ford's Ferry, 39. 

Fort Mcintosh, 27. 

Fort Moultrie, 124. 

Fort Pitt, 101. 

Forrest, Arthur, 130-131. 

Fortines, Simon, 75. 

Foster, Arthur, 94. 

Fowler, Elizabeth, 94. 

Fowler, James, 94. 

Francis, John, 30. 

Francis, William, 30. 

Francklin, George, 138. 

Eraser, Major, 107. 

Eraser, John, 125. 

Eraser, John & Co., 154. 

Eraser, Simon, 107. 

Frazer, Corp., 31. 

Frazer, Major, 142. 

Frazer, Samuel, 30. 

Frost, Elias, Horry, 154. 

Frost, Judge Edward, 15. 

Frost, Mary, 35. 

Frost, William, 35. 

Fry, Edward, 30. 

Fuller, Christopher, 67. 

Fuller, Daniel, 47. 

Fuller, Thomas, 67. 



Fuller, Whitmarsh, 91. 
Eullford, William, 95. 
Eulwood, Major, 45. 
Eurthey, John, 68. 

Gadsden, Gen., 26. 

Gadsden, Christopher, 89, 94. 

Gadsden, Martha, 63. 

Gadsden, Mary, 89. 

Gadsden, Thomas, 129. 

Gaillard, Anna, 69. 

Gaillard, Charles, 20. 

Gai lard, David, 71. 

Gaillard, Elizabeth, 72. 

Gaillard, Mary, 18. 

Gaillard, Peter, 119. 

Gaillard, Theodore, Senr., 71. 

Galpin, George, 88. 

Gammell, Corp., 31. 

Garden City plantation, 63. 

Gamier, John, 14, 172. 

Garnier, Magdalen, 14. 

Gastoni, Rev. Hugh, 35. 

Geddes, Gilbert, 60. 

Geddes, John, 61. 

Geddes Hall plantation, 61. 

Gee, Charles, 18. 

Geiske, Hardy, 161. 

Georgetown, S. C, 93, 95. 

Georgia, 27, 184. 

Georgia Troops, 39, 40. 

Gibbes, Mr., 187. 

Gibbes, A., 151. 

Gibbes, Anne 132. 

Gibbes, Elizabeth, 164. 

Gibbes, Col. John 131. 

Gibbes, Robert, 56, 62, 63. 

Gibbes. William, 62. 

Gibbes, William Hasell, 111, 112. 

Gibbon, William, 62. 

Gibbons, Simon, 32. 

Giles, Major, 100. 

Gillespie, Robert, 168. 

Ginger-root, 49. 

Girardeau, Ann, 6, 14. 

Girardeau, John, 6, 14. 

Giradeau, Rev. John I., 160. 

Giradeau, Susan King, 155, 160. 

Gist, General, 159. 

Glen, Lydia Jane, 68. 

Glover, Ann, 153. 

Glover, Charles, 153. 

Glover, Joseph, 120, 173. 

Godfrey, Benjamin, 57, 58, 62, 136, 

137. 
Godfrey, Elizabeth, 57. 
Godfrey, Jane, 57. 
Godfrey, John, 54, 57, 58, 60, 61, 67, 

137. 



INDEX 



195 



Godfrey, Capt. John, 13, 52, 55, 56, 

57, 135, 137. 
Godfrey, Col. John, 55, will, 134-138. 
Godfrey, Mary, 57, 134-138. 
Godfrey, Richard, 57, 59, 60, 61, 136. 
Godfrey, Thomas, 15, 94. 
Goodwin, Colonel, 127. 
Goodwin, John, 94. 
Goodwin, Martha, 94. 
Gordon, James, 184. 
Gould, Gen., 106. 
Gourdin, Robert N., 67. 
Govan, John, 37. 
Governor's Creek, 53. 
Governor's Point, 58. 
Graeme, William, 131. 
Graham, David, 17. 
Graham, Lieut. Mungo, 36. 
Grand Council, 3. 
Grant, Mr., 37. 
Grant, Mary, 21. 
Grant, Robert. 164. 
Gray, Sarah, 8. 
Green, Timothy, 30. 
Greene, General, Letters to, 97, 139. 
Greene, Nathaniel, 131. 
Greenland, George, 21. 
Greenland, Martha, 167. 
Greenland, Mary, 21. 
Greenwood, Mr., 38. 
Greenwood, James, 30. 
Gregg, John, 108. 
Gregory, Ensign, 131. 
Gregory, Joseph, 21. 
Grenada, Joseph, 30. 
Grenadier Guard, 30. 
Grice, Belle, 160. 
Griffin, Annabel, 156, 162. 
Griffin, John, 30. 
Griffin, Lydia, 162. 
Griffin, Owen, 30. 
Griggs, Clemard, 22. 
Griggs, Mary, 23. 
Grimball, Charles, 130. 
Grimball, Harry Morris, 156. 
Grimke, John Faucheraud, Order 

Book of, 39, 80, 123, 178. 
Guerard, Mrs., 129. 
Guerard, David, 129. 
Guerin, Elizabeth, 129. 
Guerin, James, 118, 171. 
Guerin, Martha, 118. 
Guerin, Mathurin, 129. 
Guerin, Peter, 171. 
Guerin, William, 86. 
Guerry, A. Caleb, 69, 119, 173. 
Guerry, Ann, 11. 
Guerry, Benjamin, 78, 119, 167. 
Guerry, Dorothy, 118 (2), 173. 



Guerry, John, 78, 

Guerry, Legrand, 113, 118, 168. 

Guerry, Mary, 72, 73, 173. 

Guerry, Peter, 17, 74, 79, 110, 113, 

173. 
Guerry, Peter, Senr., 111. 
Guerry, Stephen, 16, 78. 

Hackett, Elizabeth, 90. 

Hackett, Dr. Michael, 90. 

Hall, Capt. Giles, 54. 

Hallam, Henry, 117. 

Halsey, Edwin, 160. 

Haly, Dr. John, 186. 

Hamilton, Maj. James, 139. 

Hamlin, John, 170. 

Hamlin, Sarah, 170, 172. 

Hamlin, Thomas, 79. 

Hammond, Col., 81. 

Harden, Capt. Wm., 27. 

Harden, Col. William 146. 

Harding, Col. William (Letter to 

Gen. Greene), 107-108. 
Harleston, Captain, 31. 
Plarleston, John, 38. 
Harrington, William, 30. 
Harris, Major, 85. 
Harris, Lt. Col., 45. 
Harris, Aaron, 30. 
Hartley, Mrs., 35. 
Hartley, Thomas, 35. 
Harvey, Arnold, 62. 
Har\ ey, Benjamin, 62. 
Harvey, Childermas, 88. 
Harvey, Elizabeth, 110. 
Plarvey, John, 62. 
Harvey, William, 36, 59, 61, 62, 65. 
Hasford, Samuel. 73. 
Hasell, Thomas, 68. 
Hasman, William, 30. 
Havana, Siege of, 129. 
Hawkins, John, 30. 
Hays, John, 76. 
Haywood, Alfred, 153. 
Hazzard, William Miles, 153. 
Henderson, Corp., 31. 
Henderson, Lt. Col., 39. 44, 82. 
Henderson, Samuel, 30. 
Hendrickson, Andrew, 30. 
Hennings, Thomas, 166. 
Herbert, Capt., 83. 
Heriot, Col., 181. 
Herries, Mary, 20. 
Hesket, George, 35. 
Hesket, Mary, 35. 
Hewet, Hill, 112, 113. 
Hext, Alexander, 91. 
Hext, John, 77. 
Hewes, George, 66. 



196 



INDEX 



Hej^ward, DuBose, 25. 

Higgins, Capt. George, 89. 

Hill, Ann, 73, 74. 

Hill, Charles, 57, 58. 

Hill, Elizabeth, 57. 

Hill, Jeremiah, 30. 

Hill, Joan, 58. 

Hill, John, 89. 

Hill, Sarah, 58. 

Hills, Delia, 160. 

Hillsborough plantation, 15, 50, 58, 59. 

Hinds, Jane, 110. 

Hobcaw, Magazine at, 27. 

Hobcaw point, 137. 

Hoddey, Thomas, 76. 

HoUiday, Sergt., 32. 

Holliday, Mary, 91. 

Holliday, William, 91. 

Holmes, Anna Helen, 152, 153. 

Holmes, Eliza. 161. 

Holmes, Ehza Bonsall, 152, 156. 

Holmes, Elizabeth, 185. 

Holmes, Francis, 159, 185. 

Holmes, Henry Schultz, 151. 

Holmes, J., 32. 

Holmes, John, 153, 156. 

Hood, Alice. 157, 162. 

Hoole, Joseph, 168. 

Hooper, James. 30. 

Hopkins, Dr. W., 161. 

Horn, George, 30. 

Horn, Samuel, 30. 

Horry, Ann, 8, 14. 

Horry, Daniel, 142. 

Horry, Elizabeth, 8, 14. 

Horry, EHas, 15. 

Horry, EHas Junr., 8. 

Horry, Harriett, 15, 

Horry, Hugh, 172. 

Horry, Jon., 69. 

Horry, Peter, 172. 

Horry, Maj. Peter, 25. 

Horry, Thomas, 8, 14, 15, 59. 

Houckgeest, A. E. Van Braam, 125. 

Houckgeest, Catharina Sophia Van 

Braam, 125. 
Houston, Dr. James, 148, 149. 
Howard, Deborah, 167. 
Howe, Gen. Robert, 26. 
Hoyt, William, 45. 
Hubbard, Capt., 82, 123, 124, 126. 
Huger, Brig. Gen., 81, 183. 
Huger, Col. Isaac, 26. 
Huggins, Elias, 121. 
Huggins, Elizabeth Sarah, 173, 174. 
Huggins, Mark, Jr., 121. 
Huggins, Samuel, 121. 
Hughes, Ann, 115. 
Hughes, George, 30. 



Hughes, Henry, 114, 116. 
Hughes, Joseph, 30. 
Hughes, Margaret, 114. 
Hughes, Meredith, 68. 
Hull, William, 22, 23. 
Hume, Anne, 130. 
Hume, I., 159. 
Hume, John, 61. 
Hume, Peter, 130. 
Hume, P^obert, 35. 
Hunt, Elizabeth, 35. 
Hunter, Andrew, 34. 
Hunter, Elizabeth, 17. 
Hunter, James, 36. 
Husband, Laomi, 30. 
Hutton, George, 30. 
Hyatt, Rev. Nathaniel, 177. 
Hyde, William, 30. 
Hyrne, Maj. Edward, 141, 142. 
Hyrne, William Alexander, 77. 
Hysicker, Peter, 30. 

Ickerby, See Accabee, 13. 
Indian War, 37. 
Indians, 9. 
Indigo, 1, 49. 

Ingles, , 107. 

Inglis, Claudia, 129. 
Inglis, George, 129. 
Ingram, Ralph, 30. 

Jacks, John Michael, 30. 

Jackson, Lieut., 44. 

Jackson, Arthur, 30. 

Jacksonborough Assembly, 139. 

Jacobi, Sergt. Major, 32. 

Jaudon, Daniel, 76. 

Jaudon, James, 169. 

Jaudon, John, 18, 71, 114. 

Jaudon, Lydia, 1 14. 

Jaudon, Margaret, 79. 

Jaudon, Paul, Junr., 18, 22. 

Jaudon, Samuel, 118. 

Jeanneret, Elizabeth, 120. 

Jeanneret, Jacob, 19 (2), 70, 73, 109, 

116, 120, 175. 
Jeanneret, Jacob, Jr., 113. 
Jeanneret, Magdalen, 109, 171. 
Jeanneret, Margaret, 70. 
Jeanneret, Mary, 120. 
Jenkins, Lydia, 22. 
Jennens, Elizabeth, 166. 
Jerman, Edward, 21, 166. 
Jervey, Robert, 30. 
John's Island, 139. 
Johnson, Judge, 139. 
Johnson, Archibald, 94. 
Johnson, Frederick, 30. 
Johnson, Gov. Robert, 53. 



IlSfDEX 



197 



Johnson, William, 88, 89. 
Johnston, Colonel, 127. 
Johnston, Mr. (at Stono), 47. 
Johnston, Mrs., 187. 
Johnston, James, 187. 
Jones, Corp., 31. 
Jones, Charles, 90. 
Jones, Elizabeth, 21. 
Jones, Francis, 166, 168. 
Jones, George, 108. 
Jones, Helen Hodges, 160. 
Jones, John Paul, 34. 
Jones, Mary, 168. 
Jones, Maurice, 132. 
Jones, Thomas, 72. 
Jones, William, 30. 
Joor, John, Jr., 38. 
Joulee, Daniel, 114, 176, 177. 
Joulee, Mary, 176. 
Joy, Susanna, 165. 
June, Constant, 76, 114. 
June, Edward, 114, 176, 177. 

Kearsley, Corp., 31. 
Keaton, John, 30. 
Keckeley, George, 176. 
Keel, Corp., 31. 
Keel, Isaac, 30. 
Keen, Ann, 172. 
Keen, Joseph. 78. 

Kelby, , 143. 

Kelley, James, 30. 
Kelley, Woodrop, 30. 
Kelly, Robert, 160. 
Kemper, Jessie, 159. 
Kennan, Mrs., 131. 
Kennan, Henry, 36, 131. 
Kenney, Capt. William, 88. 
Kerrison, Charles, 67. 
Kiawah, 1, 2. 
Kidwell, Corp., 31. 
King, Capt. Edward, 184. 
King, Thomas, 186. 

Kingham, , 32. 

Kinloch, Francis, 36. 
Kirkland, Lt. Col.. 43. 
Kittagusta, Sachem of Choti, 87. 
Kittery, Me.. 93. 
Knight, Elizabeth, 72. 
Knox, Rebecca, 24. 
Kosicuszko, Col. Thad. (letter to Gen. 
Greene), 147. 

Labruce, Joseph, 78, 79. 
Lacy, Beverly R. D., 159. 
Ladson, Abram, 12. 
Ladson, Capt., 42, 44, 46, 47. 
Ladson, Mary, 125. 
Ladson, Robert, 11, 12. 



Lambert, Mary, 20. 

LamboU, Elizabeth, 132, 

Lamboll, Thomas, 132. 

Lambton, Anne, 132. 

Lambton, Richard, 132. 

Lancaster, Ma-y, 160. 

Landels, James, 79. 

Lathrop, Alexander Dunlop, 158. 

Laurence, Sergt., 32. 

Laurens, Helen, 130. 

Laurens, Henry, 27, 130. 

Laurens, Col. John, 180. 

Laurens, John (letter to Gen. Greene), 

139, 142. 
Law, John, 132. 
Law, Margaret, 158, 163. 
Lee, Col. Henry, 139. 
Lee, Sarah, 17. 
Legare, Isaac, Jr , 112. 
Legare, Solomon, 108. 
Leger, James, 76, 
Leger, John, 21, 
Leger, William, 76. 
Legrand, Isaac, 16. 
Leigh, Thomas, 114. 
Leigh, William, 75, 114. 
Leist, Henv}', 138. 
Lifeland plantation, 143. 
Lilley, Ann Cartwright, 152. 
Lempriere, Mrs., 38. 
Lempriere, Clement, 38. 
Lenud, Anne, 21, 69. 
Lenud, C. Wm., 74. 
Lenud, H., 78, 172. 
Lenud, Henry, 110. 
Lenud, Peter, 75, 114. 
Lepear, Caleb, 78. 
Lequeux, John, 165. 
Le Sade, Ann, 14. 
Le Sade, Elizabeth, 6. 
Le Sade, James, 6, 13. 
Le Sade, Peter, 6, 7, 13. 
Lesesne, Peter, 22. 
Leslie, Gen., 98. 
Letters to General Greene and others, 

97, 139. 
Lewis, Mrs., 112. 
Lewis, Anne, 116. 
Lewis, Charles, 166, 168. 
Lewis, Daniel, 116. 
Lewis, Elias, 18. 
Lewis, George, 90. 
Lewis, Hannah, 116. 
Lewis, Lieut. Joel, 127. 
Lewis, Mary, 90, 166. 
Lewis, Thomas, 30. 
Leycraft, Capt. John, 184. 
Lightwood, Capt. Edward, 91. 
Lilly, Ann C, 152. 



198 



INDEX 



Lincoln, Gen., 45, 125, 178. 

Lind, Agnes, 35. 

Lind, Thomas, 35. 

Lining, Capt., 42, 82. 84, 126. 

Lining. Elizabeth Ann, 12. 

Lining, Charles, 15, 58, 59. 

Lining, Edward B., 60. 

Lining, Dr. John, 58, 60, 61. 

Lining, Sarah, 60. 

Lining burial grounds, 58, 59. 

Littlebury plantation, 61. 

Littlewood, Balguy, 37. 

Livingston, George, 88. 

Lloyd, Caleb, 36. 

Lloyd, Martha, 184. 

Lloyd, Thomas, 34. 

Lloyd, William, 184. 

Locke, John, 2. 

Loftus, Martha, 23. 

Logan, J., 167. 

Logan, Joseph. 70, 171, 175. 

Long Cane Settlement, 101. 

Long, Mary, 112. 

Long, Walter, 30. 

Lookuph, Ann Esther, 151, 

Lord, Mrs., 38. 

Lord, Andrew, 38, 132. 

Lord. Samuel, 132. 

Lords Proprietor's lands (Map), 51. 

Louisbourg, Siege of, 129. 

Lowndes, Anne, 133. 

Lowndes, Rawlins, 133. 

Lowry, Capt., 80, 82, 85. 

Lowry, Major, 39, 43, 127. 

Lucas, Charles, 30. 

Lucas, Eliza, 14, 59, 64. 

Lucas, Col. George, 59, 64, 65. 

Lucas, Jonathan, 8. 

Lucas, John, 63. 

Lupton, William, 74. 

Lynah, Dr. Edward, 13, 60. 

Lynch, Sabina, 125. 

Lynch, Thomas, 71, 139. 

Lyons, John, 30. 

Lytle, Lt. Col., 41, 45, 123. 

Macbeth, Alexander, 153. 
Macbeth, George, 162. 
Macbeth, James, 157. 
Macbeth, Kate Louise, 153, 157. 
McCall. Mary, 125. 
McCallister, William, 30. 
McCants, John, 94. 
MacCartan, Francis, 88. 
McClelland, Archibald, Jr., 176. 
McClelland, Esther, 176. 
McClintig, Alexander, 109. 
McCollock, William, 30. 
McCollough, Derrill H., 154. 



McCollough, Mary, 110. 
McDonald, Archibald, 30. 
McDonald, James, 30. 
McDowell, Lt. Col., 82. 
McDowell, George, 75, 79, 111, 112, 

114, 170. 
McDowell, John, 30. 
McDowell, William, 30. 
McFarlane, Malcom, 30. 
MacGiUivray, Farquhar, 131. 
McGirtt, Daniel, 27, 28. 
McGregor, Alexander, 173. 
McGregor, Daniel, 116, 117, 171 (2). 
McGuinness, Jeremiah, 30. 
McGuire, Philip, 45. 
McHugh, John, 30. 
Mcintosh, Gen., 181, 182. 
Mcintosh, John Mor, 149. 
Mcintosh, Lachlan (letters to Gen. 

Greene), 148-149. 
Mcintosh, Col. William, 149. 
Mclver, Catherine, 71. 
Mclver, Rose, 17. 
McKann, William, 30. 

McKenzie, John, 185. 
McKilopth, Miss, 161. 
Mackewn, Robert, 35. 
MacLeod, Rev. John, 91. 
MacLeod, Robert, 89, 90. 
MacLish, Capt. John, 35. 
McMullen, Alexander, 47. 
MacNeil, Dr. Archibald, 89. 
MacNeil, Mary, 89. 
McPherson, Elias, 20, 68. 
McPherson, James, 68. 
Macpherson, Capt. James, 184, 185. 
Madsden, Robert, 30. 
Magnolia Cemetery, 53. 
Mag wood, James H., 67. 
Magwood, Simon, 67. 
Maham, Col., 106. 
Majoribanks, Major, 105. 
Malmody, Col., 81. 
Mann, Mrs., 77. 
Marlow, Sergt., 31. 
Marion, Francis, 25, 28, 107. 
Marion, Francis, (Letter to Gen. 

Greene), 106. 
Maroney, Vincent, 31. 
Marshall, Capt., 91. 
Marshall, Elizabeth Marianne, 36. 
Marshall, Francis, 120. 
Marshall, George, 36, 37. 
Marshal, Isobel, 36. 
Mason, Col., 81. 
Martin, Gov., 148. 
Martin, Edward, 75. 
Martinico, 129. 



INDEX 



199 



Maryville, 50, 59. 

Mason, Col., 81, 84, 123. 

Mathewes, Maurice, 9. 

Mathews, Sergt., 32. 

Mathews, Benjamin, 91. 

Mathews, Isaac, 91. 

Mathews, John Raven, 1 14. 

Mathews, Rev. Philip, 177. 

Matthews, Anne, 37. 

Matthews, George, 90. 

Matthews James, 36. 

Matthews, John, 37. 

Matthews, William, 38. 

Maume. Peter, 18. 

Maverick, John, 54. 

Maybank, David, 36. 

Maybank, Esther, 171 (2). 

Mayers, Joseph, 145. 

Mayers, Thomas, (letter to Gen. 

Greene), 145. 
Maynard. Ann, 18. 
Maynard, Charles, 18. 
Mayrant, Anne, 34. 
Mayrant, John, 34, 36. 
Mayson, Lt. Col._, 45, 81, 84. 
Mazyck, Benjamin, 185. 
Mazyck, Isaac, 131. 
Mazyck, John, 185. 
Mazyck, Stephen, 129. 
Meek, Adam, 30. 
Melton, Maj., 107. 
Michau, Ann, 166, 167. 
Michau, Elizabeth, 118, 119, 167. 
Michau, Esther, 166, 169. 
Michau, Frances, 73, 78. 
Michau, Jacob, 73, 121. 
Michau, Lydia, 119. 
Michau. Manasseh, 73, 74, 111, 173. 
Michaui Paul, 119, 121, 166, 167. 
Michau, Peter, 18. 
Micheau, Capt., 37. 
Middleton, Ralph Izard, 67. 
Middleton, Arthur, 140, 141. 
Middleton, Col. Thomas, 87. 
Middleton, William, 87. 
Mikell, Ephraim, 9. 
Mikell, Mary, 9. 
Miles, Capt. Joseph, 184. 
Miles, Lewis, 70. 
Miles, Silas, 35. 
Miles, Capt. William, 13, 65. 
Miller, John, 152. 
Mills, Andrew, 115, 120. 
Mills, John, 30. 
Miot, Elizabeth, 115, 117. 
Mitchell, Anthony F., 77. 
Mitchell, Edward, 74, HI. 
Mitchell, James, 31. 
MitcheU, J. E. Moore, 61. 



Mitchell, Sarah, 77. 
Mitchell, Thomas, 74. 
Mitchell, Rev. William, 177. 
Morgan, Rev., 91. 

Monger, , 57. 

Monk, Martha, 22, 23. 

Montague, Lord Charles Greville, 90. 

Montagu, Harriott Elizabeth, 90. 

Moodie, Edward, 60. 

Moody, Joseph, 34, 132. 

Moody, Katherine, 132. 

Moore, Lieut.. 182. 

Moore, Elizabeth, 132. 

Moore, Isaac, 48. 

Moore, Gen. James, 26. 

Moore, Mary, 111. 

Moore, John, 132. 

Morecock, Nicholas, 35. 

Morgan, Gen., 98, 99. 

Morgan, James Morris, 153. 

Morrel, Mrs., 149. 

Morris, Capt. Staats, 125. 

Morris, Capt. Thomas, 36. 

Morrison, Anna, 121. 

Morrow, Matthew, 42. 

Mossman, William, 31. 

Motte, Col. Isaac, 25. 

Motte, Jacob, 130, 142. 

Motte, Mary, 142. 

Motte, Rebecca, 142. 

Moultrie, Gen., 45. 

Mouzon, Eleanor, 117. 

]\Iouzon, Elizabeth, 74. 

Mouzon, Lewis, 74. 

Mouzon, Samuel, 16, 18. 

Mouzon, Susanna Elizabeth, 74. 

Muhlenberg, Gen., 100. 

Muller, Rev. Albert, 177. 

Mullings, Elizabeth, 88. 

Mullings, George, 88. 

Munro, Sergt., 32. 

Murphy. Edward, 31. 

Murray, General, 129. 

Murray, Lady Anne, 86. 

Murrav, David, 185. 

Murray. John, 114, 185. 

Murray, Dr. John, 86. 

Murray, William, 120, 166, 167. 

Murrell, Damaris, 79. 

Murrell, Jno. Jonah, 117, 174. 

Murrel, Martha, 165. 

Murreh, Paul, 172, 174. 

Murrell, William, 165. 

Murrell, William, Jr., 165. 

Myddleton, Major, 98. 

Nash, Col. Francis, 25. 
Neal, Anne, 175. 
Neal, William, 176. 



200 



INDEX 



Neale, , 6. 

Neale, Jacob, 9. 
Neale, Mary, 6. 
Neat, Thomas, 31. 
Neilson, Maj. Matthew, 184. 
Neufville, Peter M., 111. 
Nevin, Isabella, 184. 
Nevin, John, 184. 
Newton, Sergt., 31. 
Neyle, John, 37. 
Nightingall, Thomas, 91. 
Noble, Ruth, 113. 
North, Thomas, 17. 
No. Ca. Light Horse, 39. 

Oakes, James, 31. 
O'Brien, James, 88. 
Odingsell, Charles, 132. 
O'Donnel, Rev. John, 177. 
Ogerton James, 81. 
Old Charles Town, 1, 49. 
Old, Ensign, 102. 
"Old Town Plantation," 6, 65. 
Oldham, Archibald, 31. 
Oldham, Bennet, 88. 
Olive tree, 49. 
O'Neal, Douglas, 32. 
O'Neal, Seymour, 31. 
Oneida Chief, 186. 
Orange Grove (plantation), 13. 
Orange Grove Creek, 13. 
Orange, James, 31. 
Osborne, Adlai, 162. 
O'SuUivan, Florence, 2. 
Oucconosta, 87. 
Outerbridge, Anne, 38. 
Outerbridge, White, 38. 
Owens, Maj., 44. 
Owen, William, 2. 
Oyster Point, 5, 53. 

Pacy [or Pearcy] Elizabeth, 73. 
Pacy, Mary, 112. 
Palmer, Capt., 108. 
Pahner, Capt. Robert, 108. 
Panthetion Creek, 7. 
Panthetion Island, 7. 
Panting, Rev. Thomas, 187. 
Parker. Col., 179. 
Parker, Thomas, 110. 
Parker, Wm. McKenzie, 8, 13. 
Parker's Ferry, 41. 
Parks, Nathan, 75. 

Parsons, , 91. 

Parsons, David, 31. 
Parsons, James, 90. 
Parsons, James Obrien, 90. 
Patchbell, Charles Thomas, 91. 



Patchbell, Hannah, 91. 

Pawley, Elizabeth, 73. 

Pawley, Mary, 73. 

Pawley, Percival, 17, 73. 

Peace, Isaac, 14. 

Peacock, Anne, 89. 

Pendleton, Henry, 141, 142. 

Penrice, Edmund, 31. 

Peppin, Joseph, 152. 

Perdreau, Ann, 171. 

Perdriau, Benjamin, 17, 19, 20, 71, 
72. 

Perdriau, John, 69. 

Perdriau, Lydia, 20, 76, 112, 114, 115, 
164. 

Perdrieau, Esther, 118, 164. 

Perkins, Capt. George, 35. 

Peronneau, Mrs., 37. 

Peronneau, Alexander, Jr., 14. 

Peronneau, Edward C, 13. 

Peronneau, Henry, 37. 

Perret, Abraham, 174. 

Perret, Francis, 165. 

Petrie, Alexander, 87, 111. 

Philadelphia-packet, 34. 

Philsbee, Richard, 117. 

Pickens, Gen., 104. 

Pickens, Andrew, (Letter to Gen. 
Green) 101-103. 

Pickering, Francis, 31. 

Piercey, Sarah, 79, 112. 

Pierpont, Benjamin, 66, 67. 

Pillans, Mary, 89. 

Pillans, Dr. William, 89. 

Pinckney, Mrs., 88. 

Pinckney, Maj., 43, 81, 82. 

Pinckney, Col., 42. 

Pinckney, Col. C. C, 28. 

Pinckney, Rev. C. C, 141, 177. 

Pinckney, Charles, 64. 

Pinckney, Charles Cotesworth, (let- 
ter to Gen. Greene), 148. 

Pinckney, Harriott, 142. 

Pinckney, Roger, 88. 

Pinckney, Ruth, 132. 

Pinckney, Lieut. Thomas. 129. 

Pinckney, Thomas, (letter to Gen. 
Greene) 141. 

Pinckney, William, 35, 132. 

Pinhorn, Robert, 31. 

Pipkin, Daniel, 3. 

Pippin, Mary, 152. 

Pippin, Mathew, 152. 

Pirates, 37. 

Pocotaligo, 107. 

Poinsett, Elisha, Senr., 184. 

Porcher, Mrs., 91. 

Porter, Benjamin, 119. 

Porter, John, 119. 



INDEX 



201 



Postell, Jehu, 23. 
Postell, John, Junr., 17. 
Poten, Thomas, 68. 
Potts, James, Jr., 95. 
Potts, Robert, 31. 
Powers, William, 48. 
Pressiman, William, 125. 
Prevost, Joseph, 67. 
Price, Mr., 97. 
Price, Reuben, 31. 
Prince Frederick's Parish, 164. 
Prince William's Parish. 184. 
Prioleau, Elijah, 92. 
Prioleau, Martha, 61. 
Prison Ship, 145. 
Pritchard, James, 32. 
Pritchard's place, 27. 
Proby, John, 32. 
Prue, Frances, 89. 
Prue, John, 89. 
Pulaskie. Genl. Count, 82. 
Purcell Rev. Dr. Henry, 65. 
Purcell, Rev. William, 29. 
Purves, Lt. Col., 44, 83, 123. 

Quakers, 87. 

Quartermans plantation, 61. 

Quincy, Samuel, 57. 

Raiford, Capt., 43, 44, 80, 82, 84, 123. 
Raines, John, 72. 
Rainey, Johnston, 132. 
Rains, William. 78. 
Ranev, Lazarus, 174, 175. 
Ravenel, Mrs. St. Julien, 14, 59, 64. 
Ravenel, William, 59. 
Rawlins, Ellen, 109. 

Raybold, ,31. 

Raybold, Sergt., 32. 
Redford, Francis, 21. 
Rees, Thomas, 164. 
Reeve, Anne, 35. 
Reid, James, 91. 
Rembert, Catherine, 113. 
Rembert, Elias, 169. 
Rembert, Elizabeth, 113. 
Rembert, Gabriel, 173. 
Rembert, Isaac, 19, 70, 74, 79. 
Rembert, Isaac, Jr., 113 (2). 
Rembert, Joachim, 116. 
Rembert, Martha, 79. 
Rembert, Mary, 116. 
Rembert, Michael, 116. 
Rembert, Peter, 109. 
Rembert, Rachel, 19. 
Rembert, Sabina, 105. 
Rhett, Col. Alfred, 163. 
Rhett, Elizabeth W., 161. 



Rhett, Elizabeth Washington, 163. 

Rhodes, Caroline, 158, 163. 

Rice, 107. 

Rich, Elizabeth, 175. 

Richardson, Major, 44, 82, 126. 

Richardson, Capt. Henry, 88. 

Ripley, Alicia Middleton, 156, 161. 

Ripley, Gen. Roswell S., 161. 

Rishea, Phebe. 78. 

Rivers, George, 60. 

Rivers, James, 71. 

Roach, John. 167. 

Robert, Jonah, 17, 18, 20, 69, 70, 72. 

73. 
Robert, Peter, Junr., 16. 
Roberts, Corporal, 31. 
Roberts, Ann, 125. 
Roberts, Col. Owen, 25, 40. 
Roberts, Col. Owen, Death of, 124- 

125. 
Roberts, Capt. Richard Brooke, 124- 

125. 
Roberts, William, 31. 
Robertson, Catherine, 151. 
Robertson, John, 152. 
Robinson, John, 78. 
Roche, Francis, 38. 
Rodgers, Capt. James, 90. 
Rose, Elizabeth, 11 (2), 12. 
Rose, Elizabeth Clark Saunders, 60. 
Rose, Elizabeth Sanders, 13. 
Rose, Francis, 7, 11, 12, 13, 60. 
Rose, Henrietta, 11. 
Rose, Margaret, 11, 12. 
Rose, Mary Ann, 13. 
Rose, Mary Ann Blake, 03, 60, 65. 
Rose, Richard, 11, 12. 
Rose, Richard, of Abingdon, 11. 
Rose, Robert, 12, 13. 
Rose, Sabina, 11, 12. 
Rose, Sarah, 12. 13. 
Rose, Thomas, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 60, 

65. 
Rose, Thomas, Jr., 10. 
Rose, Thomas, Senr., 12. 
Rose family, 9. 

Rose-Cleland of Rath-Gael, 11. 
Rosse, Capt. John, 36. 
Rothmahler, Anne, 74. 
Rothmahler, Erasmus, 117. 
Rothmahler, Job, 74. 
Roux, Albert, 165. 
Roux, Lewis, 165. 
Rowser, William, 167. 
Royal American Regiment, 34, 129. 
Royal Gazette, 34, 86, 129. 
Russel, Alexander, 184. 
Russell, William, 90. 
Rutledge, Arthur M., 97. 



202 



INDEX 



Rutledge, Major Arthur Middleton, 

97. 
Rutledge, Edward, 140, 141. 
Rutledge, Henry, 97. 
Rutledge, Henry Middleton, 97. 
Rutledge, Hugh, (letter to Gen. 

Greene), 144. 
Rutledge, Gov. John, 105-106. 
Rutledge. John, (letter to Gen. 

Greene), 145. 
Rutledge Mounted Riflemen, 157. 

St. Andrew's Parish, 1, 49, 124. 

St. Domingo, 151. 

St. James' Santee, Parish Register, 

16, 68, 109, 164. 
St. Leger, John, 90. 
St. Mary's Church, 151. 
Salley, Alexander Samuel, Jr., 34. 
Sample, James, 31. 
Samways, Catherine, 9. 
Samways, Henry, 10, 135. 
Samways, John, 8, 9, 12. 
Sanders, Col., 108. 
Sanders, Ann, 73. 
Sanders, Mary. 16. 
Sanders, Roger, 169. 
Sanders, Thomas Martin, 167, 168. 
Sands, James, 90, 91. 
Sanford, Capt., 2. 
Sanford, Robert, 1. 
Sardoine (ship), 37. 
Sarly, Capt., 91. 
Saxby, George, 23. 
Say, Edward, 186. 
Sayle, Nathaniel, 3. 
Sayle, Gov. William, 3, 5. 
Schencking, Barnard, 138. 
Schermerhorn, Capt. John, 88. 
Scott, Lt. Col., 42, 46, 127. 
Scott, Susanna, 38. 
Scott, William, 38. 
Scovillites, 27. 
Screven, Aaron, 93. 
Screven, Benjamin, 23, 24. 
Screven, Elizabeth, 167. 
Screven, Elisha, 94-95. 
Screven, Hannah, 94. 
Screven, Joshua, 94, 95. 
Screven, Permanous, 93. 
Screven, Samuel, 94, 95. 
Screven, Savill. 93. 
Screven, William, 94, 95. 
Screven, Rev. William, Burial place 

of, 93-95. 
Seaman, George. 89. 
Sebring, Edward, 65. 
Self. Samuel, 121. 
Semple, Alley, 169. 



Semple, Rattrey, 122. 

Semple, William, 122. 

Seymore, Alexander, 31. 

Shackelford, John, 120. 

Shackelford, John, Jr., 75. 

Shackelford, Sarah, 76. 

Shackelford, William C, 172. 

Shaftsbury, Earl of, 53. 

Shaftesbury Papers, 4. 

Sharp, William, 34. 

Shaw, William. 90, 91. 

Sheedy, John, 31. 

Shelby Isaac (letter to Gen. Greeae), 

104. 
Shembee, 137. 
Shepard, John, 23. 
Sheppard, James, 136. 
Shields, Anne. 76. 
Shinner, Charles, 87. 
Shokes, John, 175. 
Shore, Thomas, 3. 
Shubrick, Capt. Thomas, 179. 
Siddal, Capt., 86. 
Silk Hope plantation, 60, 61. 
Simmons, Ebenezer, 129. 
Simmons, George, 21 (2) 70, 167, 175. 
Simmons, John, 23 (2). 
Simmons, Mary, 70 (2), 165, 175. 
Simmons, Patience, 21. 
Simmons, Peter, 21 (2). 
Simons, Ann, 61. 
Simons, Anthony, 109. 
Simons, Marie Bowley, 156. 
Simons, Robert, 118. 
Simons, Sedgwick Lewis, 61. 
Simpson, Sergt., 31. 
Simpson, EHzabeth, 184. 
Simpson, Francis, 31. 
Simpson, John, 184. 
Simpson, Macgillvray, 160. 
Simpson, Robert. 31. 
Simpson, William, 31. 
Simson, Christopher, 90. 
Sinkler, Daniel, 16. 
Sinkler, Elizabeth, 119. 
Sinkler, Elizabeth, (letter to Gen. 

Greene), 143-144. 
Sinkler, James, 71. 119, 173. 
Sinkler, Jane, 173. 
Sinkler, Peter, 143, 173. 
Skinner, Margaret, 22. 
Skirving, James, 88. 
Skirving, Mary, 87. 
Skirving, Sarah, 88. 
Skirving, William, 87. 
Smalaga, Mary, 19. 
Small, Capt., 128. 
Smily, William, 31. 
Smiser, Mr., 132. 



INDEX 



203 



Smiser, Anna Regina, 132. 

Smith, Abigail, 95. 

Smith, Ann, 60. 

Smith Archer. 89. 

Smith, Benjamin, 131. 

Smith, Benj. John, 60. 

Smith, Elizabeth, 21, 185. 

Smith, Faith, 114. 

Smith, Henry A. M., 1, 49, 134. 

Smith, James, 31. 

Smith, Capt. James, 34. 

Smith, John, 31, 112. 

Smith. Julia E., 155, 159. 

Smith, Marv C 155. 

Smith, Mary Clifford, 159. 

Smith, Peter, 60. 

Smith, Phineas, 159 (2). 

Smith, Rev. Robert, 185. 

Smith, Samuel, 186. 

Smith, Thomas, 10, 138. 

Smith, Thomas, Senr., 91. 

Smith, William, 186. 

Snelling, John, 91. 

Somersall, Sarah, 185. 

Somersall, William, 185. 

Somer's House Capt., 82. 

Somer's plantation, 80. 

South Carolina and American General 
Gazette, Death notices from, 34, 
86, 129, 184. 

South Carolina Continental Regi- 
ment of Foot (Second), 25-33. 

So. Ca. Historical Society, Collec- 
tions, 54. 

South Carolina Society, 89. 

Snow, William, 24. 

Spencer, Calvin, 111. 

Spencer, Oliver, 54. 56. 

Spencer, Thomas, 23. 

Spender, Capt. George, 36. 

Spillman, James Blair, 160. 

Stafford, Thomas, 31. 

Staley, Christopher, 13. 

Stanbury, John, 85. 

Stanton, James, 31. 

Stanyarne, Henrietta, 185. 

Stanyarne, James. 57, 185. 

Stanyarne Jane, 57. 

Stedimans, Mrs., 145. 

Stedman, Robert, 34. 

Steel, Anne, 71. 

Steel, John. 31, 70, 177. 

Steel, Peter, 71. 

Steel, William, 71. 

Stephens, John, 56. 

Stephenson, John, 112. 

Stevens, John, 66. 

Stewart, Adam, 37. 

Stewart, Kesia, 76. 



Stiles, Benjamin, 60. 

Stiles, Copeland, 13. 

Stocks, Samuel, 11, 12. 

Stoddard, David, 91. 

Stokes, Arthur, 163. 

Stoll, David, 187. 

Stone, Benjamin, 72. 

Stone, Josiah, 31. 

Stoutinburgh, Luke, 87. 

Stoutinburgh, Sarah, 87. 

Streator, James, 87. 

Stuart, Col., 105. 

Stuart, Henry, W, 91_. 

Stuart, Rev. John, 177. 

Stuart, Francis, 35. 

Stuben, Baron, (Letter to Gen. 

Greene), 100-101. 
Strutham, Steven, 31. 
Sugar-cane, 49. 
Sullivan, Daniel, 171. 
Sullivant, John, 31. 
Sullivant, Stephen, 20. 
Summers, Margaret, 68. 
Sumner, Gen., 43, 45, 80, 81. 
Sumter, Gen., 103, 150. 
Sumter, Gen., (Letter to Gen. 

Greene), 97-99. 
Surgener, John, 31. 
Sutton, Hezekiah, 166. 
Swinton, Alexander, 94. 
Swinton, S., 171. 
Sylcope plantation, 61. 
Symonds, Frances, 66. 
Symonds, Henry, 66, 135. 

Tankerville, (Lord), 11. 
Tarbox, William, 115. 
Tarleton, Col., 98. 
Taylor, John, 91. 
Taylor, Capt. Philip, 123. 
Taylor, Ruffin, 115. 

Teague, -, 54. 

Teague, Corp., 31. 
Therrell, Moses, 31. 
Thirsting, Thomas, 110. 
Thirteen Mile House, 80. 
Thomas, Col., 46. 
Thomas, Dempsey, 31. 
Thomas, Philip. 31.^ 
Thomas, Rowland, 31. 
Thomas, WiUiam, 70. 
Thompson, Col., 47. 
Thompson, Gov., 158. 
Thompson, James, 71. 
Thompson, John, 31. 
Thomson, John, 65. 
Thornton, Mary, 130. 
Thornton, Samuel, 129. 
Threes, Randolph, 114. 



204 



INDEX 



Tidyman, Mrs., 120. 

Tiger Swamp plantation, 14, 60, 61. 

Timothy, Peter, 130. 

Tinnin, Lt. Col., 80, 82, 124. 

Tonyn, Gov., 148-149. 

Tories, 42, 103. 

Towers, Lieut., 37. 

Towner, Lydia, 121. 

Townsend, Joseph, 35. 

Trapier, Elizabeth, 75, 165. 

Trapier, Judith, 68. 

Trapier, P., Jr., 68. 

Trapier, Paul, 23, 75. 

Trenholm family (genealogy), 151- 



163 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 



Alfred, 158, 163. 
Alfred Glover, 153, 158. 
Alfred Legare, 160. 
Alicia Middleton, 161. 
Ann, 152, 163. 
Anna Glover, 156. 
Anna Helen, 153, 157. 
Annie Elizabeth, 153. 
Arsene LeSeigneur, 157. 
Arsene Louise, 151, 152. 
Bertha, 159. 
Caroline Hopkins, 160. 
Celestine Robertson, 154. 
Charles Glover, 153. 
Charles Louis, 152, 155, 



159, 160 
Trenholm, Claudia, 162. 
Trenholm, Claudia Jenkins, 160. 
Trenholm, Constance, 157. 
Trenholm, Edward, 161. 
Trenholm, Edward George, 160, 163. 
Trenholm, Edward Leonard, 152, 156, 

160, 162, 167. 
Trenholm, Eliza Florence, 154. 
Trenholm, Eliza Grimball, 156. 
Trenholm, Eliza Helen, 155. 
Trenholm, Elizabeth, 152. 
Trenholm. Elizabeth Rhett, 163. 
Trenholm, Ella, 159. 
Trenholm, Eloise Waties, 161. 
Trenholm, Emily St. Pierre, 153. 
Trenholm, Emma Josephine, 154. 
Trenholm, Emma Julia, 153. 
Trenholm, Esther, 152. 
Trenholm, Esther Barron, 153. 
Trenholm, Esther Constance, 152. 
Trenholm, Evelen Chisolm, 161. 
Trenholm, Florence, 158. 
Trenholm, Francis Holmes, 154, 158. 
Trenholm, Frank Smith, 160. 
Trenholm, Georgia Anna Helen, 153. 
Trenholm, George, 152, 156. 
Trenholm, George Alfred, 151, 153- 

155, 159 (3). 



Trenholm, George Alfred de Sepos, 

152. 
Trenholm, George de Greffin, 153. 



Trenholm 
Trenholm 

162 (2) 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 



156, 159 



Trenholm 
Trenholm 

Horst 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 

163. 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 

163. 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 
Trenholm 



Glover Flolmes, 156, 161. 
George Macbeth, 157, 



Georgiana Elizabeth, 153. 
Harriett Yeadon, 159. 
Helen Emily, 156. 
Helen Grimball, 161. 
Helen Morgan, 159. 
Helen St. Pierre, 157. 
Helen Twells, 163. 
Henry Dennison, 156. 
Irene de Griffin, 152, 153, 



Irene Ella, 153. 

Jane Heyward Vander 
, 162. 

John Bohun, 160. 
John Girardeau, 159. 
John Middleton, 161. 
Josephine, 159. 
Julia F., 160. 
Julian Chisolm, 161. 
Julian de Sepos, 157, 162, 

Kate, 157. 

Katherine Waties, 163. 
Leonard, 161. 
Lila Lilley, 153. 
Lillah, 159. 

Louis de Greffin, 156, 162. 
Louise, 162. 
Marguerite, 158. 
Marie Louise, 155, 159. 
Mary, 152. 
Mary Alice, 161. 
Mary Chisolm, 161. 
Mary Clifford, 159. 
Mary de Grefiftn, 157. 
Minnie Adger, 160. 
Paul Cartwright, 153, 156. 
Pierre Holmes, 156. 
Robert Webb, 160. 
Ruby Marqurite, 163. 
Sarah Giradeau, 160. 
Savage Deas, 156, 161. 
Talliferro Thompson, 160. 
Thomas Burden, 155, 160. 
Videau Marion, 160. 
William, 151-163. 
William DeSaussure, 158, 

William de Greffin, 152. 
William Lee, 153, 158. 162. 
William Le Seigneur, 153. 
WiUiam Wagner, 156. 



INDEX 



205 



Trewin, William, 36. 
Trezevant, Theodorus, 93. 
Tucker, Daniel H., 153. 
Tucker, Capt. Edward, 88. 
Turley, Louise, 161. 
Twells, Maude, 157, 162. 
Twells, John, 162. 

Upthegrove, Francis, 31. 

Van Braam Houckgeest, See Houck- 

geest, Van Braam. 
Vanderhorst, Capt., 179. 
Vanderhorst, Elias, 119. 
Varambaut, Francis, 37. 
Varloe, Capt. Thomas, 129. 
Vamer, Ann, 17, 71. 
Varner, Elizabeth, 19. 
Vamer, Henry, 19. 
Vaux, W.; 73. 
Vereen, Rebecca, 18. 
Virginia, 52. 
Vivane, John, 21. 
Voorhees, J. N., 65. 

Wagner, Theodore Dehon, 152. 

Waheawah, 56. 

Waite, Ezra, 91. 

Walker, James, 169, 170, 173. 

Walker, John, 95. 

Walker, Legare Jones, 154. 

Walker, Richard, 167. 

Walker, Thomas, 31. 

Walker, William, 18, 19 (2). 

Waller, Ann, 75. 

Walter, Ann, 91. 

Walter, Thomas, 91. 

Walter, Col. William, 34. 

Wambaw Church, 177. 

Wando (or Cooper) River, 5. 

Wappalau Creek, 66. 

Wappoo, 1, 49. 

Wappoo Creek, 3, 56. 

Wappoo plantation, 64. 

Ward, Anne, 91. 

Ward, Daniel, 171. 

Ward, John, 91. 

Wardrop, George, 35. 

Ware, James, 69. 

Waring, Ann, 91. 

Waring, Catherine, 90. 

Waring, John, 90. 

Waring, John Lloyd, 132. 

Waring, Richard, 91. 

Warren, Samuel, 115, 116, 117, 118, 

121, 165, 168, 173, 176. 
Warren, Rev. Samuel Fenner, 16, 68, 

72, 109, 2d marriage, 164, death, 

177. 



Washington. Lt. Col. William, (Let- 
ter to Gen. Greene), 105. 
Waties, J., 168. 

Waties, Jane Gordon, 156, 160. 
Waties, John, Junr., 75. 
Waties, Thomas, 111. 
Watson, Charles, 184. 
Watson, John, 35. 
Watson, William, 35. 
Watts, Capt., 105. 
Watts, Nehemiah, 31. 
Watts, Rebecca, 165. 
Wa3Tie, Catherine, 120. 
Wayne, William, 120. 
Webb, Benjamin, 72, 73, 79. 
Webb, Elizabeth, 72. 
Webb, Sarah Hannah, 72, 73. 
Webb, Thomas, 18, 20. 
Webber, Mabel L., 16, 34, 68, 129, 

164, 184. 
Weekly, John, 31. 
Welch, Thomas, 31. 
Welch, William, 85. 
Wells, John, 74, 185. 
Wells, William, 31. 
Wespanee, See Westpenny, 13. 
West, Joseph, 2, 3, 49, 50, 52, 53, 

54. 
Weston, Alicia, 185. 
Weston, Plowden, 185. 
Westpenny, 13, 14, 59. 
Westpenny Creek, 14. 
Wheeler, Rev. Daniel, 38. 
Whitaker, Sarah, 57. 
White, Anthony, 71. 
White, Anthony, Jr., 19. 
White, Anthony Martin, 77. 
White, Henry, 24. 
White, John, 69, 112,164. 
White, Margaret, 77, 78. 
White, Martha, 112. 
White, Mary, 118. 
White, Robert, 62. 
White, Susanna, 169, 170. 
Whitfield, Joshua, 31. 
Whitfield, Rebecca, 174. 
Whiteley, John, 31. 
Wieley, John, 31. 
Wigfall, Joseph, 76. 
Wiggins, William, 31. 
Wilkie, John, 186. 
Wilks, Lemuel, 169, 171. 
Willcox, Daniel, 77. 
Williams, Elizabeth, 91. _ 
Williams, Jarvis, 187. 
Williams, John, 21, 118. 
Williams, Robert, Jr., 91. 
WilHamson, General, 41, 43, 81, 83, 
85, 124, 126, 127. 



206 



INDEX 



Williamson, Champernown, 36. 
Williamson, Henry, 12. 
Williamson, Isaac, 31. 
Williamson, Richard, 31. 
Williamson, William, 132. 
Willingham, Christopher, 118, 167, 

170. 
Willingham, Elizabeth Ann, 118. 
Willingham, Joseph, 17. 
Wilmot, Benjamin, 31. 
Wilson, John, 31. 77. 
Wilson, Capt. Thomas, 34. 
Wilton, Rev. Joseph Darce, 37. 
Winnsborough, 98. 
Windsor, Thomas, 31. 
Winter, Lieut. Theodore, 34. 
Wirosdick, John, 120. 
Wise, Major, 42, 44, 45, 80, 82, 84, 

126. 
Withers, Charlotte, 117. 
Withers, Elizabeth, 121, 172. 
Withers, James, 76, 119, 172. 
Withers, Mary, 117, 121. 
Withers, Richard, 166, 172. 
Withers, Capt. Richard, 79, 119. 
Withers, Sarah CoUins, 119. 
Withers, William, 121. 
Witsell, John, 31. 
Wofford, Col., 43. 



Wolsey, John, 31. 
Wolvey, John, 31. 
Woodberry, Jonah, 16. 
Woodberry, John, 69. 
Woodrop, Anne, 34. 
Woodrop, William, 34, 131. 
Woodward, Dr. Henry, 134, 137. 
Woodward, John, 57, 59, 61, 136. 
Woodward, Mary, 59. 
Woodward, Richard, 59, 61. 
M^oodward, Sarah, 59. 
Wooley, Robert, 158. 
Wragg, Joseph, 74. 
Wragg, Joseph, 75, 117. 
Wyly, Samuel, 86, 87. 

Yantee plantation, 57. 

Yeadon, Richard, 13. 

Yeamans, Sir John, 3, 4, 61, 62, 136. 

Yeamans, Sir William, 61, 62. 

Yeo, William, 19. 

Yon, Charles, 185. 

Young, Benjamin, 77. 

Young, James, 153. 

Zeigler, Capt., 143. 
Zouberbuhler, Bartholomew, 36. 
Zubly's Ferry, 179, 182. 



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